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TheLoucheyMonster!

Letherbee dist. a limited barrel aged absinthe for Chicago

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Perhaps, but I'd like to be the judge of that for myself.

I weighed the fact that they are new, and that the last update to this was in February, and thinking they may be a couple batches further along.....

And they seem to be a fine bunch of boys, putting forth a good effort. http://drinks.seriouseats.com/2013/04/behind-the-scenes-letherbee-distillers-chicago-original-label-gin-malort-micro-distillery-tour.html

Other than satisfying my own curiosity, I feel I can afford to encourage their endeavour in what little way I can, at least once.

Besides, it may just make for a good "sippin" absinthe after all.

I'll report back on it just the same, good or bad.

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I like their gin and autumnal. Their malort is... well... Malort. :)

 

But their absinthe just wasn't very good. The wood overpowered everything, and the anise levels were off. Of course, feel free to make your own decision, but we're here to share our experiences, so I did.

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Tasted it. My impressions. Not horrible, but definitely star anise. I do not detect any trace of barrel aging or oakiness or any type of wood. Some vanilla, but it is definitely added, not the result of true barrel aging.

 

 

Still......somewhat tasty.

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Weird that you tasted no barrel aging effects, when my bottle was chock full o' effects. Not necessarily good ones, but they were definitely there. The tannic bitterness of using what appeared to be either new wood or very low char, and doing so for too short of a time period was very obvious to me. Maybe a different batch?

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Maybe. I have had plenty of barrel aged alcohol and some of it was absinthe, yet the vanilla was subtle. Perhaps I expected more. It does remind me of something which I am still trying to recall.

 

 

 

I always take out my oak dentures before drinking absinthe.

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Some people would be shocked to taste how much any spirit can vary from barrel to barrel... even from the same cooperage, same lot, equal char or toast, same barrel size, same storage conditions, same orientation... same batch of spirit.

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Not a bad beverage really. Kinda like a cross between absinthe and whisky. Batch 2/13, so maybe this is a different one that what you have Brian. I found it to be easily sippable neat, or with just a splash of water. Louched around 3/1 Has delicate flavors of citrus and herbs, probably somewhat due to the barrel aging. Light oakiness, not overpoweringly so, (for sure a faint taste of white oak with very little, if any char) . Badiane more noticeable in the second half of the glass. Somewhat thin mouthfeel. Mild finish at first with a noticeable lingering bitter bite reminiscent of the late PF Tarragona. Interesting, not terrible, not offensive, just not very fullfilling when an absinthe is called for. I'll drink this bottle, and enjoy it. I believe they have the right respect for the historical essence of what absinthe is, and who knows? subsequent batches could prove promising.

 

http://vimeo.com/75270610

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Way late to the game but just noticed this stuff at DrinkupNY.

 

What do you guys think about taking a good blanche like Ridge or Clandestine and putting them in one of those little oak barrels you can buy to "age" moonshine?

 

It'd be a rather pricey experiment but the failure or success would be all yours.

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It would definitely be an experiment.

 

I know that there is controversy over whether or not small barrels are fit for aging spirits, and a standard 53 gallon barrel would be an expensive gambit only a producer could afford to take (or a really rich and patient patron).

 

I like some of the barrel aged absinthes out there but none have tasted different or good enough to buy except for a long-form, full barrel limited batch that is extremely expensive. For certain reasons though I'm not purchasing anything from that distiller.

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There are also oak chips, dust, and spirals that most homebrew shops and websites carry. My reservation would be that it can be easy to over oak a product. Good thing some brands are widely available and "affordable" for experimentation. If you over oak something like a widely available blanche or verte that's fairly consistent in flavoring, one could probably get by with blending it with a fresh bottle. It wouldn't be a bad experiment to throw at a guest being introduced to absinthe who might be coming from more of a whisky, brandy, or other oaked spirit background.

 

I've only oaked a few homebrew experiments, but if I were to use oak chips on an absinthe, I'd probably start with a blanche.

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Ok I ordered the little ager that Brian posted and will get a bottle of Duplais blanche here locally. Seems like a good choice. Apparently you get full flavor in 6 weeks.

 

Will report back in 2 months!

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I went on a bourbon & scotch trip for a while but we cleaned out the 1-2 drink bottles of absinthe lately and that certainly helped boost the interest back.

 

Yeah we have a liquor store now that has:

 

Corsair Red

Duplais

Duplais Blanche

Brevans HR Giger

Heritage

VP

Pacifique

St. George

Leopold Bros

Lucid

 

:euro:​

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A better bet would be to buy these. Not only can you commit a smaller amount of spirit, you don't get the major evaporation that you do in small barrels:

 

http://tuthilltown.gostorego.com/barrels/barrel-aged-cocktail-kit.html

 

This is off-topic but that kit is very appealing. Perhaps you could help fill me in about what they mean by " for maturing your favorite white cocktail"???

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Pretty much any cocktail that doesn't have cream, egg, or substantial amounts of fruit juices can be barrel aged. It can create an amazing melding of flavors. Even cocktails made with brown spirits can be further aged.

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