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Letherbee dist. a limited barrel aged absinthe for Chicago

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A Chicagoland micro distillery has what looks to be a limited barrel aged absinthe, It will be part of a Christmas gift pack seen here:

403.ba.eo.op.giftguide.leatherbeexSS.jpg

 

Caption from "Time out Chicago":

 

Letherbee Distillers Holiday Box Set

The handsome, minimal bottles from this new Chicago distillery are good enough gifts on their own. But with this gift set, you can get every spirit Letherbee’s made so far (Original Label Gin, Autumnal Gin and Barrel Aged Absinthe) nestled in a custom-built box by RX Made constructed from reclaimed old-growth pine floorboards and a strap made from repurposed leather belts. $89.99. Visit facebook.com/letherbee for retailers.

Photo: Martha Williams

http://timeoutchicag...iday-gift-guide

(from that link, scroll to second image)

 

I haven't found a whole lot about the absinthe itself, just a little blurb that says:

Brenton also makes a sipping absinthe that may be the only one in the U.S. that is aged in a virgin bourbon barrel.

found here:http://blog.restaurantintelligenceagency.com/2012/10/the-flavors-of-autumn-take-shape-in-gin/

 

Availability: out 'soon', and from the distillers facebook notes it looks like some of the shops that the distiller sells to may ship.

 

Facebook page:

http://www.facebook.com/Letherbee

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could mean that what the maker had in mind, is a spirit formulated to be sipped neat. like a whiskey.

Every time I've seen that comment, that's exactly what they mean. We'll see. I'll be picking one of these sets up as soon as they go to market. As always, I'll report back.

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Ahoy!

 

After a hiatus of some years, I returned to let you folks know about this, but was beaten to the punch! Bravo!

 

This stuff is made at a distillery only blocks from my apartment, and my SO works at a wine bar that will be featuring it.

 

I will report back once I've had a taste, and I can guarantee I won't be 'sipping' it.

 

Good to be back, though. A series of unfortunate events made it so I could drink nothing more costly than Old Crow or Two Buck Chuck. Glad all of you are still at it.

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Welcome back (for good?), buddy!

 

Well, there 'are' indeed some "sippin' whiskeys" that clock in around 126 proof. An absinthe coming in at ~63% is certainly not unheard of.

 

I just think the idea of sipping (any) uncut absinthe to be miserable and awful.

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I'm a little confused by the barrel designation: virgin bourbon barrel. Does this mean that the barrel was meant to be used for bourbon but instead was used for the absinthe? Or does this mean that the barrel was seasoned with bourbon but has not held any other spirit? If such is the case, then isn't it improper to refer to it as "virgin" unless, somehow, the barrel can regain its virginity?

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This is what they posted on Facebook on Feb 1:

http://www.facebook.com/Letherbee


Barrel-Aged Absinthe.
Absinthe Brun.
This is a white absinthe aged for 6 months in:
NEW, CHARRED, FULL-SIZED AMERICAN OAK BARRELS.
126 proof.
It's being delivered to retailers/on-premise accounts this week

 

 

I interpret that to mean that the barrel is newly charred and not previously used for another spirit.

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I'll let some other brave soul try it first.

I'm sure you will. You just don't seem the adventurous type to try something until somebody tells you it's ok. And this is not a dig. Just an observation.

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Have these people ever made another absinthe? Or they just came out of the blue with a limited edition?

I agree with Marc that 6 months in a new charred barrel is WAY too much for absinthe. With absinthe is very easy to overdo the barrel aging and have the oak overwhelm everything that is not anise.

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I agree with Marc and Stefano. But I still had to buy a bottle. Gotta take the bullet, you know?

 

Speaking of barrel aging, I might have missed it, but does anyone know how long Barrique was aged? Was the Alandia version aged for a different amount of time than the recent special release?

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I'd say that if they're going to age an absinthe in new barrels, six months isn't long enough. Anyone who's tasted the fast-food whiskies that are being rushed to market by new micro-distilleries knows that all you can taste is new oak and some tannin. The chemical processes of the wood changing over time are overlooked; barrel aging isn't just about making "wood tea".

 

If six months isn't long enough for whiskey, why should it do any differently for absinthe? Give it four years and let's see what happens. Could be brilliant, could be a mistake.

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Agree wholeheartedly, G.




"Whisky-sinthe? I'll let some other brave soul try it first."




Been there, done that a few years back with an HG.



It was extremely tasty, as matter of fact.

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"Speaking of barrel aging, I might have missed it, but does anyone know how long Barrique was aged? Was the Alandia version aged for a different amount of time than the recent special release?"

 

 

Six years. And having tasted it regularly as it went from 3 to 6, I think it's at its best now. So far!

I believe that the Alandia product was first released when it was about 2 years old, or maybe a bit less.

 

Edited to try to sort out my terrible quote (blame the iPad).

Edited by Alan Moss

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Good things to learn. I'd forgotten that Whiskey is aged for years. I like whiskey and absinthe, but was a bit hesitant of the mix. Could well be quite tasty.

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I'm curious having tried a whiskey-sinthe a while back.

 

This barrel age thing might be in small barrels for the fast turnaround, much like the fast-food whiskies Gwydion is talking about.

 

I'd be very interested in the bullet you take Brian. Do tell us about the wounds.

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Finally had a chance to try this at Reno in Chicago. I was pouring the water from a drinking glass, so I can't judge the louche, though I feel I could describe its color as feuille morte (something I've never seen in person, so pardon me if I'm off base).

 

It wasn't unpleasant. I could taste the barrel aging, like a weakly steeped absinthe with a drop of vanilla.

 

The whole thing seems rushed, or an attempt at novelty. I'll give them a couple years to work on it and try again. A few years ago this would have been mind blowing to me, but now that I have tasted better I know I can save money and just grab a bottle of Kübler.

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