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AiO

Sipping Absinthe :) Watchin' Movies

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Well, I need to look into more french film, so I'll take your stunning ladies into consideration next time I'm looking for something to watch. I'll say that the strong sentiments behind folks here have caused me to procure Persona, I'm looking forward to watching it when I get the chance. i didn't know how influential it was until I looked it up on wiki ( didn't read any plot though).

 

 

Also, just tossing this out there since some TV was mentioned, and the series truly bridges the gap between silver and small screen- I think the right absinthe with certain episodes of the original Twilight Zone may cause a religious experience. Where is Everybody?, Walking Distance, and though not an original production of the show- An Occurrence At Owl Creek Bridge... All good places to start with glass in hand.

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By the way, did anyone see the article in the NYT today about the art of pairing movies with the right drinks.

 

Absinthe (Lucid) gets a shout-out, but the writer pairs it with A Very Long Engagement--another Tatou-fest from Jean-Pierre Jeunet.

 

So much for his finely-tuned "filmic receptors." And he doesn't even like absinthe!

 

Double fail, I say. :thumbdown:

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oh yeah, done the Twilight Zone thing many times.Always a pleasure! I found Persona to be a lot heavier on atmosphere than story.

 

Still haven't got up the gumption to try Leave It To Beaver and absinthe together, though.

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Pabst's Threepenny Opera is one of my favorites. Has anyone seen Guy Maddin's Brand Upon the Brain? The dvd has several choices of narrators, and when I watched it (after a few glasses of absinthe) I selected Crispin Glover's narration. It's something I'll never forget.

Edited by Ryan Winn (ubu)

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I've got it, but I haven't watched it yet. Maddin's stuff needs just the right set and setting or it's just a waste of my time.Maybe that time is nigh.....

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The new release of the restored Metropolis with the correct orchestral score. Stunning, visionary and slowly becoming prophetic. Several glasses, well-timed for the duration.

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Really? I didn't think the latest version had made it to DVD/Blu-Ray yet.

 

A visionary film for sure, although the themes are a bit hokey and the symbolism's pretty heavy-handed at times. As with most science fiction films, the visuals are more arresting than the story, IMO. I'm anxious to see it with the restored footage, but based on what I've read, I doubt it'll do much to change this.

Edited by AiO

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Don't know if the version I have is the one yer all talkin' bout but I've got a pretty meticulously restored version. I must concur with AiO storywise but it looks great.

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Maddin's stuff needs just the right set and setting or it's just a waste of my time.

 

I know what you mean. It was months after I bought it before I finally watched it. I had a couple of glasses and the decision to watch it was spontaneous. I think that's also how I finally saw some of Dusan Makavejev's films. As media and technology speed up the world, I can definitely feel my attention span getting shorter. When I drink absinthe, though, it's a lot easier to relax and enjoy.

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I first discovered Maddin with Careful!, which blew me away. Now, years later, it seems quite different than I remember but no less demented. The color didn't seem so obnoxiously oversaturated then but it was on a 2nd gen VHS.

 

I've tried to watch Twilight of the Ice Nymphs 3 time so far; I've gotten maybe a third of the way through. I think Maddin's stuff is brilliant in the proper context, but I'm not quite sure what that context is anymore.

Edited by buddhasynth

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Fritz Lang's masterpiece.

 

An excellent movie. Someone mentioned the symbolism being heavy handed. They may be correct, but look at the time period. Film was such a young medium, and all young media need time to iron out the wrinkles in presentation. Some people feel video games are going through the same growing pains now towards becoming legit mainstream artistic expression.

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I think Maddin's stuff is brilliant in the proper context, but I'm not quite sure what that context is anymore.

 

Agreed, but it's all just The Saddest Music in the World, to me.

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The last big DVD release of Metropolis (also from Kino) was a "restored" version too, running 124 minutes. It came out in 2002 and was a good half an hour longer than the most widely available version, which ran about 95 minutes. The new new version that is coming out soon includes an additional 25 minutes of lost footage recovered from an archive in Argentina in 2008. It apparently has full scenes only described by intertitles in the 2002 version. Cool story, but, like I already said, knowing the content of these scenes, I doubt they'll do much to change my overall impression of the narrative.

 

Someone mentioned the symbolism being heavy handed. They may be correct, but look at the time period. Film was such a young medium, and all young media need time to iron out the wrinkles in presentation.

 

I don't buy this argument for a second. Film was a fully realized, mature medium by 1927, when Metropolis was released. By that point, cinema had already been around for more than 30 years and had produced a good many masterpieces. Check out the ones that came out in 1927 alone: Napoleon, Underworld, Sunrise, The General... And in the preceding years Greed, The Kid, Foolish Wives, The Last Laugh, The Gold Rush, Faust, Die Niebelungen (another Lang epic that's all around superior to Metropolis, if you ask me--even though it was supposedly Hitler's favorite movie)... the list goes on and on.

 

Any lapses of artistic judgment in Metropolis are Lang's own and should not be foisted off on the imagined "growing pains" of the medium itself. Though truth be told, I blame most of the groaners in the story on the scriptwriter, Lang's wife Thea von Harbou, who was a rank sentimentalist and, later, an ardent Nazi who stayed behind in Germany when Fritz thumbed his nose at Goebbels and took the midnight train to France in 1933.

 

But that's just me.

 

/rant off.

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 Die Niebelungen (another Lang epic that's all around superior to Metropolis, if you ask me--even though it was supposedly Hitler's favorite movie)... 

 

 

 

 

right withya there.I could give a flying rat's ass about Hitler's favorite anything; that movie has some of the most beautifulest photography ever. And Siegfried has Fast Hair® that doesn't move... 

 

 

 

 

Of course a woman who would marry Attila and burn his palace down to roast her family inside, thus avenging my wrongful death, will always be dear to my heart.

 

 

 

 

 

also withya on Thea; furthur comment would be extraneous.

 

 

 

 

Greed. What a great one. I haven't thought of that one in some time. What a dynamite ending. :thumbup:

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I have wanted to see Greed for years, but haven't found it anywhere (including places like Amazon). Where can I find this (legally)?

 

edit: I just checked Amazon again, and saw that they have it used on VHS for $150. Yikes.

Edited by Ryan Winn (ubu)

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You can't drink a VHS tape.

 

Nor can you repeat the experience of drinking a particular glass of pre-ban, unfortunately. Whereas you can rewatch a classic film on VHS as many times as you want. I'll admit to paying out the nose for rare VHS tapes back in the day. I remember shelling out $75 for an out-of-print VHS tape of Gun Crazy, for example, years before it finally came out on DVD. Never regretted it.

 

I have wanted to see Greed for years, but haven't found it anywhere (including places like Amazon). Where can I find this (legally)?

 

edit: I just checked Amazon again, and saw that they have it used on VHS for $150. Yikes.

 

Talk about lost masterpieces; Greed is the holy grail as far as I'm concerned. I always cite it when people tell me that "everything" is out on DVD now. I taped the 4-hour reconstructed version that TCM ran back in the late '90s (they may still run it occasionally today; I don't get the channel anymore). It's way better than the butchered 2-hour version that MGM released back in 1924, but the still photos and intertitles standing in for lost scenes make one pine for the original 10-hour version (supposedly a "word-for-word" adaptation of McTeague) that Stroheim originally filmed. Can you imagine? Talk about needing to time your glasses of absinthe!

 

Fuck Irving G. Thalberg.

 

stroheim_03-greed.jpg

 

 

By the way, there are several good Stroheim films that are available on DVD: Foolish Wives, Blind Husbands, Queen Kelly (though it, too, was wrested from Stroheim's control by the studio)...

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I don't buy this argument for a second. Film was a fully realized, mature medium by 1927, when Metropolis was released. By that point, cinema had already been around for more than 30 years and had produced a good many masterpieces.

 

Fair enough. But how many feature-length science fiction films had the expressionist movement (or any movement) produced as social commentary by 1927? Subjective effect was not widespread until the late teens, both in narrative and cinematographical contexts. Symbolism grew after. I'll stick by my first gut reaction (though with no disrespect to those as came before), Metropolis was born of a young medium; creative and vigorous, but largely unshaped by critical theory.

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...and let's not forget Lang's own underrated Frau im Mond (Woman in the Moon), which came out just two years after Metropolis, when the medium was still "young."

 

Everyone has the right to his/her own opinion, but I'm not sure I really understand yours, divulse123.

 

Are you saying that the fact that cinema (or expressionism) hadn't produced many social commentary/sci-fi movies by 1927 proves that the medium was unsophisticated then?

 

I'm also not sure what you mean by "subjective effect" or how you see it being related to symbolism. And silent cinema "unshaped by critical theory"?

 

Care to explain further?

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My original comment was directed at the idea that the symbolism in Metropolis was "heavy handed". I agreed, and pointed out that film was a young medium. Whether it was unsophisticated, I doubt it was less sophisticated than any other medium of artistic expression that had been around for the same amount of time.

 

I'm a philologist and literary critic. From my point of view, any medium that has not had time to reflect generations of academic criticism is young and perhaps unrefined. Some great films have been mentioned, most of them produced in the mid/late 1920's, while visionary sci-fi shorts appeared quite a bit earlier. But how many thousands of works of English literature were produced between Chaucer and Milton? Lyric between Sappho and Callimachus? I'm not expert enough to say Chaucer or Sappho was unsophisticated, but the medium was young and less refined than in later generations.

 

By subjective effect, I meant the use of point of view to convey to the audience the illusion of experiencing what the narrative subject is experiencing. This is opposed to having an oblique point of view.

 

Historically speaking, in narrative media, symbolism did not develop until after subjective effects.

 

But hey, I'm no film expert, just a fan. Did not mean to step on toes. And by the way, is Aelita Russian? I think I may have seen it once if it is, but I don't remember.

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Then I must have seen it. Pity I don't remember. One of my college roomates majored in Russian, and he was always watching early Russian films. I usually drank too much to remember them. :thumbdown: Maybe I'll give it a sober try!

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