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Obsello Absenta

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Looking forward to seeing you guys at the Mutineer event in LA! I've yet to have the pleasure of meeting you guys in person!

Edited by odiedog52

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There is also one palette in the last container that I had laying around the distillery for 1.5 years. It also had a bit different character. You'll know if you found this one because it will come out of the bottle almost brown.

 

I could have blended all this stuff out so it seemed more uniform. But I thought it would be more fun for different batches to be a little different in character.

 

Honestly, as a consumer that (based on my previous bottle of Obsello) recently ordered three more bottles for daily drinking and/or gifts, I find this news far more disconcerting than fun.

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I find that even though consistency is wonderful when it comes to a great product, variances in batches is what makes buying the same bottle over and over a little more worth it. Variety is the spice of drinks is it not?

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I like the small differences in batch spirits. It helps me discuss the subtleties of each. My best example would be a coloring issue that some have. Botanicals are fun that way. JMO

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I like the small differences in batch spirits. It helps me discuss the subtleties of each. My best example would be a coloring issue that some have. Botanicals are fun that way. JMO

 

Agreed.

 

I find this news far more disconcerting than fun.

I'm guessing you're not much of a Single Malt Scotch or Artisinal Spirits/Beer drinker.

 

Your guess is wrong, on all counts.

 

I find that even though consistency is wonderful when it comes to a great product, variances in batches is what makes buying the same bottle over and over a little more worth it. Variety is the spice of drinks is it not?

 

Aye! But, as I read Obsello's post, we're not talking about the "small differences" between batches of artisanal product. Rather, an old batch that's hung around the distillery a while, has turned "almost brown" and is shipping under the same label as all other Obsello.

 

Don't take me wrong here: I like Obsello. Why else would I have ordered three more bottles? I also like artisanal spirits. Not to put too fine a point on it, but is Obsello an artisanal spirit? There is no indication of batch/date/vintage/etc. on any of the bottles I have seen.

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Rather, an old batch that's hung around the distillery a while, has turned "almost brown" and is shipping under the same label as all other Obsello.

I'd take a 1 year old bottle any day over a fresh one.

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Absolutely.

 

The same absinthe can look quite different due a relatively short time aging (depending heavily on brand and/or storage conditions). Acceptable color ranges from a fresh bright natural green to amber, to a dead leaf color and all points in between. It should not necessarily be perceived as a flaw, especially if a browner color is indeed the result of aging (fresh out of secondary maceration might be a whole 'nuther story though).

 

In fact, by it's very nature, absinthe should ideally be aged several months to a year, but it's just not practical at this point for most craft distillers. Some reputable vendors have even offered Jade, Duplais, etc., that has been aged an additional year for a higher price.

 

EDIT: For the above reason, and for the reason of possible variations with artisanal absinthes, I do agree that a bottling date or batch number is very helpful.

Edited by Green Baron

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First off

 

THANKS for ordering 3 bottles! We love you.

 

Now to address your comments. Throwing in the 1.5 year batch was done as an added bonus to our consumers. Its an early distillation I set aside to see how it would age. The brownish color is a result of the chlorophyl in the herbs starting to turn into sugars. Its a good thing. Chemically similar to what happens in a barrel as the hemi-cellulose breaks into simple sugars. It ads depth and character. I would have put it in a special label (and charged extra) but alas the government is difficult to deal with.

 

If you get these bottles dont be concerned, they taste very pleasant. I would never ship something I thought was going to taste less than up to spec, and I checked this batch (many times in fact, ; ) prior to shipment). I wish I could tell you where they are but the importers warehouse cant distinguish between lots so they ship randomly.

 

I would have kept the bottles forever but my new project forced me to unload a few treasures from around the distillery (including these guys).

 

I hope that puts your mind at ease. By the way all the distillations in the past 12 months carry a tag on the back that tells you which batch your drinking. Unless of course the labeling guys screwed it up (I dont directly oversee that part).

 

Cheers,

Bryan

 

I like the small differences in batch spirits. It helps me discuss the subtleties of each. My best example would be a coloring issue that some have. Botanicals are fun that way. JMO

 

Agreed.

 

I find this news far more disconcerting than fun.

I'm guessing you're not much of a Single Malt Scotch or Artisinal Spirits/Beer drinker.

 

Your guess is wrong, on all counts.

 

I find that even though consistency is wonderful when it comes to a great product, variances in batches is what makes buying the same bottle over and over a little more worth it. Variety is the spice of drinks is it not?

 

Aye! But, as I read Obsello's post, we're not talking about the "small differences" between batches of artisanal product. Rather, an old batch that's hung around the distillery a while, has turned "almost brown" and is shipping under the same label as all other Obsello.

 

Don't take me wrong here: I like Obsello. Why else would I have ordered three more bottles? I also like artisanal spirits. Not to put too fine a point on it, but is Obsello an artisanal spirit? There is no indication of batch/date/vintage/etc. on any of the bottles I have seen.

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Don't be dis-concerned quartermaster. I would not be the least upset to receive a bottle of brown absinthe from 100 years ago, would you? Same goes for one form last year, you may even find you enjoy it even more. The color may not be as beautiful as an emerald green but like a fine women the green fairy too gets better with age.

Edited by m.a.mccullough

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I have only tried Obsello once, but I liked it, as did my husband, who is not an Absinthe fan. He described it as "refreshing." I agree. My first reaction to it was "light and a bit mellow" but I'm used to describing wine, not Absinthe, and I think I had just tried the Kübler before the Obsello, which may explain my reaction.

 

Anyway, from a newbie, I like it.

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By the way all the distillations in the past 12 months carry a tag on the back that tells you which batch your drinking. Unless of course the labeling guys screwed it up (I dont directly oversee that part).

 

Cheers,

Bryan

 

Thanks Bryan!

 

Thanks too to all of you who chimed in to quell my concerns.

 

I am enjoying my second glass of Obsello (4:1, sans sucre) of the eveing as I write this. :cheers:

 

Maybe they are older than 12 months, but none of the four bottles I've received (all from DUNY) have had any batch tag or other batch labeling. Please, get on those labeling guys! IMHO: those batch tags add value to the brand. Also, once word gets around about this "Special Reserve" Obsello, we'll need those tags & batch number to track down bottles! :pirate:

 

Addendum: Aye! to amber, and Aye! again to "dead leaf" colour. But brown? Ah! Language! There's the rub! I was imagining pouring something the colour of strong tea or coffee.

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Hmm... I'll check into the tags on the back. They should have them.

 

Its interesting how differently people drink it, in terms of ratios. I drink it at a 3:1 with sugar. My business partner swears by 2:1 no sugar.

 

Enjoy! AND thanks for the support.

 

 

By the way all the distillations in the past 12 months carry a tag on the back that tells you which batch your drinking. Unless of course the labeling guys screwed it up (I dont directly oversee that part).

 

Cheers,

Bryan

 

Thanks Bryan!

 

Thanks too to all of you who chimed in to quell my concerns.

 

I am enjoying my second glass of Obsello (4:1, sans sucre) of the eveing as I write this. :cheers:

 

Maybe they are older than 12 months, but none of the four bottles I've received (all from DUNY) have had any batch tag or other batch labeling. Please, get on those labeling guys! IMHO: those batch tags add value to the brand. Also, once word gets around about this "Special Reserve" Obsello, we'll need those tags & batch number to track down bottles! :pirate:

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Addendum: Aye! to amber, and Aye! again to "dead leaf" colour. But brown? Ah! Language! There's the rub! I was imagining pouring something the colour of strong tea or coffee.

 

Hehe, I should be more in tune to marketing. Allow me to amend my prior statement. Some of them are almost "olive tinged amber with opalesque inflections of crimson sunset." ;)

 

Their definitely not the color of coffee or strong tea. More a shade of olive oil.

 

Enjoy!! And don't get to excited guys. I sent over a full container and this was only one palette. So the chances of getting these are about 1 in 10. The rest are now about 3-4 months old.

 

Cheers,

Bryan

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Its interesting how differently people drink it, in terms of ratios. I drink it at a 3:1 with sugar. My business partner swears by 2:1 no sugar.

 

FWIW: I started out drinking all Absinthe at 3:1 with sugar. Experience and education brought me to 4:1 with no sugar as my standard. But, really, I think Absinthe becomes different drinks at different dilutions. Not only, IMHO, do the better Absinthes stand up to the extra water, they blossom for it: releasing further layers of nuance. Then again, it may just be that my old and jaded palette requires greater space between points of reference. When all is said and done, it is only a matter of taste. And, sometimes I want a sweet nectar; othertimes I long for the crisp freshness of an alpine dew.

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Your experience seems to be a fairly common one. I used to sugar every absinthe I drink. Now, I only sugar as part of the tasting process where I drink some both with and without. But if I'm only drinking to enjoy it, it's around 3.5-4:1, no sugar.

 

I feel kind of silly with a bunch of absinthe spoons sitting around. ;)

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Odd, after Bryan mentioned the tags, I checked the two bottles I have. The one I bought almost a year ago ( last august) had the tag-label with batch number, while the latest bottle purchase from two or three weeks ago didn't have it. Didn't have the neck tag-hanger either, but I assumed that was the liquor store's choice to remove them.

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About a week ago I got my first bottle of Obsello. I also bought a cheaper brand called Emile Coulin (and Duplais Balance), but after tasting a couple of drinks of both (Obsello and EC) I'll certainly stick to the Obsello for an every day drink! Perfect taste with not much of a hassle about it. Clean and fresh with a nice finish, and also a nice greenish louche. I really like it a lot! :)

 

The other brand I bought (Emile Coulin) does give quite a bitter aftertaste, but even when drinking it it's a very simple (and a little bit too bitter) flavor of only licorice, sugar/sweetness and that bitter sensation of too much or added wormwood.

(Here's a link to my experience of Emile Coulin in another thread.)

 

 

Obsello wins this comparison, by far! :thumbup:

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So yeah, after a bit of a shipping complication, I received my first bottle of obsello, which is also my first absinthe.

 

First thoughts, really nice bottle design. Black bottle with green label, and a black wax (?) seal? Classy. Also nice and minimalist, it doesn't try as hard as most of the brands I've seen around the liquor store.

 

 

Now, the taste. Keep in mind that this is pretty much my first taste of absinthe, so my opinion is largely colored by newbie glasses. First off, I think I used bad water for the louche - the glass I've got has this really weird funky taste to it, but it seems reminiscent of the taste my tapwater usually has, so I don't think its the obsello to blame for it. Also, I think I may have overdiluted it some.

 

Other than that, it's . . . different? Definitely an acquired taste. I think I'll be trying a few more glasses before setting on a real opinion. Don't think I'll regret the purchase though, all things considered.

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First off, I think I used bad water for the louche - the glass I've got has this really weird funky taste to it, but it seems reminiscent of the taste my tapwater usually has, so I don't think its the obsello to blame for it. Also, I think I may have overdiluted it some.

 

Hi Stefan,

 

Some folks find their tap water to be sufficiently good for loucheing, but I think they're in the minority. I would personally always recommend spring or filtered water of some sort. Bear in mind too that the temperature of the water will have a lot to do with the flavor, as well. I enjoyed my bottle of Obsello, but I will say that it has a slightly more distinctive taste than many of the other well-regarded brands.

 

Overdiluting was a mistake I also made in a couple of my early experiments. What I like to do now when I'm sampling a new absinthe is start with sampling a glass at 3.5:1, then 4:1, then 4.5:1 (I've found that few do well at 5:1, but you'll probably know if a particular absinthe can take it at the 4.5:1 sample). Mark your glass with the amounts if you need to. I also recommend trying a few sips without sweetener first, and then trying it with, although some folks always like their absinthe with or without, and if you're one of those then that's a step you can skip.

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You may want to start at 3:1. Some absinthes over dilute pretty quickly. Most of my absinthes are great at 4:1, and a couple shine at 5:1! There are a couple that 3:1 seems just right.

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