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Obsello Absenta

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I have a suspicion that with the better absinthes I'll be using less sugar. For example, with VP, the taste is so interesting that sugar just coats everything and stifles the experience. And with something like Obsello, it's so naturally sweet--to me at least--that sugar erases the subtlety of it.

Okay Grasshopper, you can give the pebble back now. And don't forget to brand your arms on the way out!

:dev-cheers:

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Very true! It's a good feeling actually, finally having the ability to judge various brands and begin to form a better picture. I guess finally my enthusiasm will get a chance to be matched by more tempered enjoyment!

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You'll approach your beverages in a whole new way. One evening may seem to fit better with Obsello over Leopold and so forth. So, the more choices you have, the more you appreciate each drink.

 

Fun stuff ain't it?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, is the answer. Cheers!

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Good! :thumbup:

 

Go for the gusto...the more decent (or better) absinthes you try, the more seasoned (and grateful) your palate will become.

I couldn't agree more...In fact, I even bought a bottle of Hill's while in Canada (even though I've never read a good review of it) just to be able to compare/contrast the good absinthes to the bad. Believe me, you will never appreciate something like Balance more than after trying Hill's...(the "burning method" should be applied to the entire bottle, safely, Molotov cocktail-style...)

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By the way, I'm a big fan of the Obsello. It's got its own unique character without being radically different from what is considered "typical" traditional absinthe (like St. George). Watch the water amount, as it has lower alcohol (I like a 1:2 or 1:3 ratio, no sugar). :thumbup:

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By the way, I'm a big fan of the Obsello. It's got its own unique character without being radically different from what is considered "typical" traditional absinthe (like St. George). Watch the water amount, as it has lower alcohol (I like a 1:2 or 1:3 ratio, no sugar). :thumbup:

 

Hello Sardonix,

 

Thanks for the kind words. Please post a review!!!

 

I have to share my personal take on the sugar vs no sugar and I am going to add a new dimension... beet sugar vs cane sugar.

 

Each absinthe is totally different in this department. For years I was a strictly no sugar guy. For a while I went through a blanch phase (by the way I make a pretty good one) and I never drank it with sugar. However when I formulated Obsello I knew the majority of my customers would be drinking it with sugar so I didn't personally try it without sugar until it was in production. For a long time I was encouraging everyone to use 3 grams.

 

The next discovery I made was trying my absinthe in the USA with cane sugar. In Spain sugar cubes are all beet in origin. To my surprise the cane sugar took something away and muted some of the flavors.

 

In the end each person has their own preference and each absinthe has its own personality. I think its about finding the one that soots the mood as was mentioned before in the thread. I also think you should always try a new absinthe with and without sugar. Its the only way to find out how its personality changes with the sweetness.

 

By the way if you want to try Obsello exactly as I formulated it its a 3:1 water ratio with 3 grams of beet sugar.

 

Now days I drink it with 2 grams of sugar and 2:1 water ratio. I suppose the business side of all this has changed me.

 

Cheers and thanks for the support!

B. Alex

Edited by Obsello

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By the way if you want to try Obsello exactly as I formulated it its a 3:1 water ratio with 3 grams of beet sugar.

 

Now days I drink it with 2 grams of sugar and 2:1 water ratio.

 

Who should know better? I'm looking forward to trying it. Again.

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Beet sugar versus High-Fructose Corn Syrup versus Cane sugar... that's a topic close to my heart (or pancreas, to be more precise).

 

Before I went on my diet, I drank only Mexican Coca-Cola, which (unlike Coke in the USA) never switched to high-fructose corn syrup. Cane sugar provides a very different sweetness from the HFCS; it's far less cloying. And my bride, in her baking, will only use C&H-brand cane sugar as an ingredient, telling me that the beet sugar that you get with store brands doesn't taste the same in the finished product (especially in frostings).

 

Now to hear B. Alex say that there is a detectable difference in beet-sugar cubes versus cane-sugar cubes when used in absinthe? That blows my mind! Looks like I've got to start stocking different types of cubes, and pairing them appropriately with the base spirit?!?!

 

DAMN! ;)

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In the continental US most sugar is beet, to be sure buy American Crystal Sugar cubes. I'm not sure about the other brands but they are beet to be sure (one bennefit of living here, its beet country and this is one thing I'm sure of) C&H advertises as "pure cane sugar" so belive them or not. Or just check out your local brands.

 

Jim

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Before I went on my diet, I drank only Mexican Coca-Cola,

FYI, I just read an article that said Pepsi is going to use real cane sugar in its Pepsi and Mountain Dew during the retro label promotion.

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Before I went on my diet, I drank only Mexican Coca-Cola,

FYI, I just read an article that said Pepsi is going to use real cane sugar in its Pepsi and Mountain Dew during the retro label promotion.

 

What a sad world we live in when Pepsi is advertising nostalgic soft drinks now with actual sugar... reminds me of the McNuggets ad "now with real chicken."

 

Truthfully the Coke and Pepsi in Spain are all sugar based since corn syrup is super expensive here. Last week when I was in New Orleans I had a coke and WOW was that a flat flavor comparatively. From now on I am satisfying all my soft drink needs, on american soil, in Mexican restaurants.

 

Have fun experimenting with the sugar guys. I think you will find it very interesting. Playing with the size of the cubes also has a big impact. In Europe the cubes come in 3 grams, 3.5 grams, and 4 grams. Most american cubes are 5 grams. I know the folks at white star are shaving down their cubes to match the 3 gram weight. Sasha is a bit of a fanatic, in a good way.

 

Note: Instead of subsidizing corn production, the spanish to the never-ending ire of the French, subsidize grape production. So while you guys get corn-syrup in everything we get wine in everything! I knew there was a reason I moved here "hick-up".

 

Cheers,

B. Alex

Edited by Obsello

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As does mine.

On the scales, the C&H weighs out at 3.8 grams.

The wrapped cubes from La Maison weigh 2.7 grams each ( 2 to a package). La Maison doesn't indicate whether they are cane or beet but only "imported from Europe."

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Dang!

 

If the US cubes are too big.....I guess a bigger dose of Obsello is in order! :cheers:

 

Jim

I like your thinking Jim!

 

I suspect the La Mason cubes are beet sugar since there is not a ready source of cane sugar in Europe and since I am pretty sure the La Mason cubes come from Germany they would almost certainly be beet.

 

Brian, next time you come to town give Barcelona a shot. I know may way around the city and have some great experiential places to show you. My favorite 2 are Las Cuevas Del Sorte, which is my local cocktail bar, and the other is a place called the Champagneria, where you can get great tapas and cheap cava. The fun part is the place is sooo crowded that you have to literally fight your way in the door to get a place to stand (no tables). The tapas are great and cheap, but the catch is you must buy a bottle of cava per tapa!

 

Cheers guys,

B. Alex

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I suspect the La Mason cubes are beet sugar

I think you're probably right. I spent a little time dissolving one after the other in my mouth. There is a distinctly different flavor and texture between the two cubes.

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Bryan, bringing an interesting perspective to the conversation as usual, I see. This is why I'm glad I prefer absinthe without sugar-to avoid all this madness! ;)

 

Sorry for not answering that last e-mail, by the way. What I was referring to regarding your name was that the drinkupny.com Absinthe Tasting Event page spelled your name as "Brian". :fork:

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