Jump to content
Alan Moss

Pernod-Ricard

Recommended Posts

Pernod-Ricard's new on-line operation which includes their absinthe, as well as their biggest sellers.

 

This seems to be just for France at this stage, so it may not have any implications for most of us here. However it is interesting that:-

 

1) Pernod-Ricard are selling on-line, and cutting out many of their trade customers, and

 

2) They include their absinthe in this operation.

 

There are several pages here on Pernod Absinthe, so they seem to be getting more serious about this ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It tastes like normal Pernod except with a slight citrus flavour and a harsh, bitter finish. Star anise all the way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Pernod absinthe sample sitting next to the KoShit in the liquor cabinet. One of those things I keep around to demonstrate how bad oil mixes can be. Pity,really. With the history associated with the Pernod name, it seems a real shame they aren't making something incredible. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If they brought back the original Pernod Fils, Edouard, whatever, it would revolutionize the market; and only they can do it.

 

Yes, but are "they" the same "they" that made the original? I mean, is anybody left connected to that company who was connected to the original, after all the sales, wars, and ban?

 

Definitely worth buying if they did!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It tastes like normal Pernod except with a slight citrus flavour and a harsh, bitter finish. Star anise all the way.

 

I know that green anise is much better than star anise...my question is why would a company use star over green? Is there a big difference in cost?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It causes a more intense louche. And I'd suspect that star anise does a better job than green anise of fulfilling people's expectations of absinthe tasting like licorice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If they brought back the original Pernod Fils, Edouard, whatever, it would revolutionize the market; and only they can do it.

 

No they can't because they wouldn't know how to. They own the name. That's it.

Edited by hartsmar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They never knew how to. Current Pernod-Ricard knows nothing about pre-ban Pernod absinthe production. Simple as that.

Edited by hartsmar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hopefully, I'm wrong about this, but Pernod are putting much more weight behind their absinthe activities. They are selling a lot in Ontario and the Netherlands already, probably way more than most of the absinthes liked by members here put together. This new site obviously cost a lot of money (small change by their standards), and it is interesting to see their absinthe sold alongside Mumm champagne, Ballantine's, etc. Note that they don't sell their pastis or Chivas Regal here.

 

I would not be surprised if absinthe is one of the more popular lines sold by this new operation since it is, or at least was, quite difficult to find absinthe outside the big cities. Which will get someone in PR thinking more seriously about it. And while the site is targeted currently only at France, it would not be too difficult to add a new country or two every few months ...

 

WBT: I doubt that they would need to commission Guy or anyone to do a better product. Much easier to buy a distillery or another brand.

 

Peridot: making cheap products isn't the name of the game for them. They want their clients to trade up: look at the selection of Martell, Ballantine's, Mumm, Sandeman, Aberlour, etc.

 

And, IMHO, if anyone is able to get absinthe legalised in the USA, it is Pernod.

 

For all these reasons, then, I think this may turn out to be a key development.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is true. Still doesn't make their absinthe any good.

 

And, I think it would be perfectly legal in the US already... Ehrm:

 

13. Pernod Absinthe

Alpha thujon(GC)

unter der Bestimmungsgrenze, BG: 0 (oder max. 1.9 mg/l)

Beta thujon(GC)

unter der Bestimmungsgrenze, BG: 0 (oder max. 1.9 mg/l)

 

And attached table from Emmert analysis.

post-20-1168423666_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
That is true. Still doesn't make their absinthe any good.

 

And, I think it would be perfectly legal in the US already... Ehrm:

I think this stops them importing it into the USA if it is called absinthe or if it contains AA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Alan may have a point in that, Pernod is already on the shelves. No matter the product they sell here, we shop around it, it's already in the peoples eye. A company as established as that will have a better chance to sway opinions than say, me.

 

That pesky AA issue seems to be the speed bump in legalization. Pernod, with cooperation of other distillers, could smooth the way some.

 

I could be over-simplifying the issue. Politics make me wince as do a lot of lawyers. ;)

 

:cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That is regarding your own importation.

FDA regulates what can and cannot be distributed within the US. According to FDA regulations the Pernod would be legal. Right...?

 

It has tested to be thujone free in more than one test, independent of each other. Given that Absente manages to be on the US market, claiming to use another cultivar of the Artemisia family, Pernod should be able to do the same. As would any other 0-level thujone drink.

 

I don't know. There are probably other technicalities as well. But looking at the regulations alone, I cannot see why they shouldn't be able to. Maybe because the technique of analysis they must use isn't as exact?

 

Almost anything they can do to help getting it legal would of course be good.

Edited by hartsmar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another interesting thing is that in the Emmert test Martini Rosso tested to have 14.4 mg/l beta-thujone using GC.

When tested using MS it was corrected to 0.0mg/l.

 

Question is, would it pass the 19080's test-method approved by the FDA if we tested that today?

 

Hell if I know.

 

 

Pernod-Ricard is probably the company to have the funds to pull anything like that off. However, Is the market big enough for them to bother for one single product?

Edited by hartsmar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One is a good start. Right now we have zero. Of course it would need to sell in order to get the attention.

 

Promote recipes and a new diet perhaps using their product. Generate interest. I'm fairly well versed in sitting and bitching. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a chemist, but what I've read on the posts here in the past, the FDA uses a very different kind of test than the ones you describe. It's more like dip a slip of paper that has been treated with a certain chemical that will react (i.e. change color) in the presence of thujone. It's been stated here by very knowledgeable individuals that this test can produce false positives, but AFAIK your product won't be tested for thujone unless it contains A. absinthium.

 

The FDA regulates thujone. But convincing them that in the quantities present in the modern product absinthe that it's not a madness-inducing, hallucinogenic drug would require major bucks. More bucks than getting them to change their test method for thujone to something more modern.

 

 

While no one who made absinthe for Pernod (or anyone else) may be alive today, we really don't know what kinds of information they may have in the form of distiller's logs or documents on researches conducted in pre-Ban days.

 

 

I'm pretty sure if they wanted to invest the research into it, they could make great absinthe. Look at what a few individuals have done recently in creating L'Artisanal, 1797, and Wormwood Blanche.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know the test is entirely different. That is why I wrote that using two different methods the Martini Rosso (available in the US) showed two very different results.

 

If I'm not mistaken the FDA regulation text (found on the web) doesn't strictly apply to A absinthium but all Artemisias.

If that is the case, even the Absente must have undergone testing for thujone. I could be wrong.

 

It would be interesting to see how an absinthe that continously have tested in on 0.0 mg/l using GC and/or MS would test in the "FDA test method".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×