Jump to content
JohnC

1914 Pernod Fils Cache

Recommended Posts

Post count at the WS or FV doesn't necessarily equate with experience...having met John, I can assure you he's got more than enough tasting experience to meaningfully evaluate something like this. It's a mistake to think that these online forums represent the world of experienced absintheurs - fewer than 10% of my customers for pre-ban (or absinthe antiques, or vintage posters) belong to this or any other online absinthe forum, and of my ten best customers none do.

 

What's become very clear as I've had the opportunity to taste more of this cache (I've now sampled 7 bottles) is that it's quite astonishingly well preserved, and, as I mentioned at Fee Verte, will, at east in part, re-write the conventional wisdom of how absinthe ages. I've many photographs which I've not yet published, and some interesting ideas on why this particular cache has remained almost preternaturally fresh. I don't want to be coy, but there are sound reasons why I don't wish to discuss this in detail on a public forum now, but rest assured in a few weeks time - at the latest - I will.

Edited by Oxygenee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair enough, I retract most of that statement. Still, experienced or not, I think it would be a pity to go through such a rare and beautiful thing in just a couple weeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Oxy suggested that merely recorking it with a normal wine cork and keeping it in the dark would be enough to preserve it for a year or more, though it won't be around that long anyway.

 

That surprises me.. Does it not preserve any longer than a year? I just wonder - if I would have bought such a bottle - whether I could drink it up in a year :blink: Just this idea hurts ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

That surprises me.. Does it not preserve any longer than a year? I just wonder - if I would have bought such a bottle - whether I could drink it up in a year :blink: Just this idea hurts ;)

 

Believe me if you'd have bought such a bottle you'd have found it impossible not to drink it within a year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed with John about this 1914 Pernod Fils. I had also a glass. The color is very similar to the Nouvelle Orleans and the taste is wonderful, it's like tasting heaven. But the thing is : this absinthe seems so fresh, not aged at all, so different from the pre ban we know, it could have been distilled last year. Amazing to discover this pre ban as it was 100 years ago, not aged at all.

It lasts long in the mouth after the glass is finished (it remained for 20 mn, I was very surprised). Yes, the louche is so oily, and the mouthfeel so creamy ! The green anise seemed very new and special for me : fruity, round, mellow, quite different from the anise in the modern absinthes. I always add sugar with absinthe (more or less), except with this one and it's probably du to the anise.

We can now answer to the eternal question : what was the real taste of the pre ban Pernod Fils ? It's really wonderful but I can tell you that Ted did an amazing job ! His absinthes (and specially the next one) are so close from this one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What Heure Verte said!

I've also tasted the PF 1914. Its freshness, its complexity and its aromatic bouquet have no limit in your mouth, a wonderful trip to the pre-ban era, you can see the bistrot and the bottle of PF on the counter.

The firework I had in my mouth is still in my head.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The way you describe it makes me want to put a second mortgage on my house just I so can get a bottle. Too bad I live in an apartment.

I'm happy for you and everyone else who is able to obtain a bottle or a tasting, and I love to hear about it. I can't wait to finally read what Oxy is alluding to with the aging.

Edited by ubu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not much of a photographer .... though I maybe could prevail on my wife.

 

I hacked off the wax and uncorked it, no point in messing about. Oxy suggested that merely recorking it with a normal wine cork and keeping it in the dark would be enough to preserve it for a year or more, though it won't be around that long anyway.

 

Was the absinthe level in the bottle as high as you had anticipated (i.e. what was the evaporation effect if any)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As the bottle itself is translucent amber the level was completely apparent before opening and indeed before purchase. The wax covering the cork and neck of the bottle was extremely thick and consequently I believe little or no evaporation has occured since bottling, possibly explaining in part the exceptional standard of preservation. I am currently storing the bottle in absolute darkness to preserve the wonderful green colour for as long as possible but as I am also intending to drink the contents over time, say twelve months, I have confidence that merely resealing with a T cork will be sufficient to inhibit oxydation for as long as I need. Should I detect any deterioration then I'll just drink it more quickly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a plan! Thanks for the scoop. Enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am wondering if there was any difficulty removing the cork or if it slid out without any issues. I have yet to receive the bottle that I ordered. I've been debating whether to uncork it or extract a few doses by syringe and then put the rest into storage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Syringe. If it's as fresh as Oxy says, I'd want to do whatever I could to keep it that way.

 

 

You're getting a bottle, Congrats!

Edited by Stroller

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Syringe. If it's as fresh as Oxy says, I'd want to do whatever I could to keep it that way.

You should be careful then as the cork could fall inside, those are thin and very friable.

Plus, the hole left by the syringe could degrade the absinthe faster.

 

My recommendations would be to uncork the bottle, fill a 20cl bottle/topette for your personal consumption, then recork the bottle tightly and eventually re-seal it for long preservation.

 

It needs a new cork if you plan to preserve it for years anyway, remember the bottles have been stored quietly for almost a century, they have traveled a lot since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely.

 

If you're really keen on not letting too much air or light come in touch with it long term, but you plan on drinking it all, you could decant it into 25ml sample bottles and fill them all up. You will then have dark bottles with little air, and store them as you would the full bottle.

 

I cannot see that that would affect the absinthe in any bad way and it would make it real easy every time you want to have a glass..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plus, the hole left by the syringe could degrade the absinthe faster.

 

If you use a small enough gauge for your syringe, the hole will close back up once the syringe is withdrawn. I've done the same thing for several vintage bottles I've extracted samples from, and all of the holes have closed up within a day. The oldest bottle, and therefore presumably the oldest cork I've punctured was from the 1870 Old Jamaican rum, and it worked just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or, if you're really worried about oxidation, you could simply use one of the many vacuum or nitrogen storage systems commonly available for wine storage. There are different types that range in price from about twenty dollars to a couple hundred (actually, a couple thousand if you're planning on handling a large number of bottles at the same time). Any good wine shop, or wine section in your local upscale supermarket, should have at least one or two of the cheaper ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Syringe. If it's as fresh as Oxy says, I'd want to do whatever I could to keep it that way.

You should be careful then as the cork could fall inside, those are thin and very friable.

Plus, the hole left by the syringe could degrade the absinthe faster.

 

My recommendations would be to uncork the bottle, fill a 20cl bottle/topette for your personal consumption, then recork the bottle tightly and eventually re-seal it for long preservation.

 

It needs a new cork if you plan to preserve it for years anyway, remember the bottles have been stored quietly for almost a century, they have traveled a lot since.

 

From what I saw in some photos crosby posted awhile ago, he left a spinal needle inserted (caped when not in use) & I assume attached a syringe to it when he wanted a sample.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing is, L.S., and Stroller, that is, you see, the thing is, gentlemen, that I was absolutely serious.

 

It's been a long time since I did anything wreckless (I don't count green shirt staining), so I figgered what the hell.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×