Traditional Absinthe

Berthe de Joux http://www.wormwoodsociety.org/media/reviews/photos/thumbnail/300x300s/92/62/7f/572_AbsintheBertheJouxbig_1282849370.jpg

 
4.6 (3)
 
4.2 (11)
 

Product Details

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Degrees ABV (% alcohol)
Year of Make (if known)
Country of Origin
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Editor reviews

Average editor rating from: 3 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
4.6
Appearance 
 
4.7  (3)
Louche 
 
4.3  (3)
Aroma 
 
4.5  (3)
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.8  (3)
Finish 
 
5.0  (3)
Overall 
 
4.3  (3)

The absinthe pours a bright peridot.Ideal with no debris or haze. The aroma is minty and fruity. Lots of wormwood, with the anise present but subdued.

The louche is quick to build, but ends just slightly thin. Rich, opalescent, pearly jade, textured with gold and blue. After water the aroma is very balanced and rich. Anise has come forward, wormwood has moved back just a bit. Citrus notes, some spice. Very fresh.

It has a full, sweet flavour with wormwood upfront, followed by a big dose of anise and fennel. Very little bitterness. Surprisingly thick and warm mouth-feel for something so summery and refreshing. A bit spicy but not overdone. Purfumey and minty.

Fruity anise dominates the finish, trailing into fennel with wormwood just pulsing underneath. Mouth-watering and infectious.

This is quite a delightful absinthe, among the best available. Having been out of the loop I had no idea what its reputation was when I tasted it, but I'm not surprised to see how well it's regarded.
Overall rating 
 
4.6
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Andrew Young July 14, 2011
Last updated: August 06, 2012
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (60)

Simply outstanding.

The absinthe pours a bright peridot.Ideal with no debris or haze. The aroma is minty and fruity. Lots of wormwood, with the anise present but subdued.

The louche is quick to build, but ends just slightly thin. Rich, opalescent, pearly jade, textured with gold and blue. After water the aroma is very balanced and rich. Anise has come forward, wormwood has moved back just a bit. Citrus notes, some spice. Very fresh.

It has a full, sweet flavour with wormwood upfront, followed by a big dose of anise and fennel. Very little bitterness. Surprisingly thick and warm mouth-feel for something so summery and refreshing. A bit spicy but not overdone. Purfumey and minty.

Fruity anise dominates the finish, trailing into fennel with wormwood just pulsing underneath. Mouth-watering and infectious.

This is quite a delightful absinthe, among the best available. Having been out of the loop I had no idea what its reputation was when I tasted it, but I'm not surprised to see how well it's regarded.

Was this review helpful to you? 
OK, for the second time, I've decided to post reviews of two sibling absinthes, completed the same day, tasting each side by side. This review and the review of the Perroquet, dated the same, are intended as a pair. There have been many commentaries on these two recent E. Pernot vertes, so here's my "compare and contrast" impressions. Everyone seems to have their favorite. I wish I could be that decisive.

Color
Unlouched, beautiful crystal clear peridot with impressive golden reflections. Clarity and brightness are top-notch. Jewell-like, brilliant. Louched, significant retention of the green. With low light, a slightly bluish jade green. Under very good light, highlights of yellows, golds, whitish blue at the edges and a very pretty orange glow fading to cantaloupe at the bottom. A bit more intensity to all the final colors than Perroquet, since a proper dilution here calls for less H2O than its sibling.

Louche
This is opalescence, a nice kaleidoscope of classic louche tones. Great sheen, "glassy" looking. The "weight" and translucence are right at the limits (upper and lower, respectively). Any more, and I would consider this too opaque. For what it's worth, nice action while forming, while it lasts, which is not long due to 56% abv. The show is over at just slightly above 1:1.

Aroma
Unlouched, evident high quality everything... grape base, wormwood and other herbs. Anise is in the background. Louched, well, much the same, with the expansions that water brings. Pontarlier wormwood, in spades, balanced by anise and an earthy fennel just slightly behind. Quite piquant. Subtle pepper (mostly white pepper), camphor, and volatility give it an assertive edge. With a little push in the dilution department (above 3.5:1), the more subtle herbs and florals show themselves. No evidence of alcohol heat, neat or louched.

Flavor
Like the nose, gobs of top-notch wormwood. Anise and fennel are actually plentiful, but the wormwood is so commanding that you might miss them at first. Alternating hints of both white and black pepper. Mouthfeel is amazingly clean and velvety, considering how action-packed this is. As with the nose, the more delicate and subtle herbals and florals reveal themselves at higher dilutions. Focus (as if this needs it!) is provided by a slight trailing mintiness.

Finish
So long it needs another time zone! Seriously... linear, spicy, tingly, minty, and fresh. That awesome Pontarlier wormwood lingers and lingers. A slight "pull" and drying countered by some aspect that prompts salivation, making the finish just juicy. All in all, a vigorous massage for the palate.

Overall
Well, try as I might to resist the hype, I've caved. It's pretty hard to ignore an effort of this level. Assertive and masculine. Stunningly good. A real statement. Absolutely one of the best I've experienced. Profound. Feel free to try different dilutions with this. There has been significant talk on the forums about drinking this at a ratio of 2.5:1 with a little sugar. My favorite dilutions are still 3.5:1 - 4:1. I just find more subtle details and complexities at this level. E. Pernot, of late, has been right in the pocket with their new offerings. This, and its sibling Perroquet, are new to the "must try" list.

Done with a 1 ounce dose, diluted 2.5:1, 3:1, 3.5:1, 4:1 and no sugar.

La Berthe De Joux, 9/11/10, 9/12/10, 9/26/10, 10/15/10, 10/30/10, 10/31/10.
All evaluations had consistent notes.

Some comparisons of Perroquet and La Berthe De Joux

Perroquet is classic peridot.
LBdJ is classic peridot.

Perroquet is all the expected louche tones in the zone.
LbdJ louche is slightly more bluish, slightly more "glassy" looking.

Perroquet is very highly complex.
LBdJ is highly complex.

Perroquet is classic, refined, detailed.
LBdJ pushes limits without going over the top.

Perroquet if you like Bentleys, Vuitton, and Harry Winston.
LBdJ if you like Hummers, Prada, and Chris Aire.

Perroquet for the "pinky out" crowd.
LBdJ for those who have hair on their chest (or those who want some!).

Perroquet - "Polly want a Cracker?"
LBdJ - "Polly want some Crack?"

So... I can't tell you all what a process crafting these two reviews has been. These reviews probably represent the sacrifice of 80% of a bottle of LBdJ, and 65% of a bottle of Perroquet. Recently, in a WS thread, there was some talk about how others impressions of beverages set one up for expectations of what to perceive. I'm as susceptible as anyone, of course. As such, I have parsed these offerings more, and compared more thoroughly to other top-notch absinthes than any other reviews I have written (including tasting short doses of my top 4 or 5 rated absinthes immediately after writing these to serve as a double-check). And I can say that any rating of "4" that either received, was so close to a "5" that I could have knocked it over the line with my heel (the same is probably true with "4" ratings for other top absinthes I've reviewed). Both are stunningly good, both are worthy of any serious absintheur's attention.
Overall rating 
 
4.5
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Michael Meyers November 01, 2010
Last updated: June 18, 2012
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (53)

"Berthe" Of The Cool

OK, for the second time, I've decided to post reviews of two sibling absinthes, completed the same day, tasting each side by side. This review and the review of the Perroquet, dated the same, are intended as a pair. There have been many commentaries on these two recent E. Pernot vertes, so here's my "compare and contrast" impressions. Everyone seems to have their favorite. I wish I could be that decisive.

Color
Unlouched, beautiful crystal clear peridot with impressive golden reflections. Clarity and brightness are top-notch. Jewell-like, brilliant. Louched, significant retention of the green. With low light, a slightly bluish jade green. Under very good light, highlights of yellows, golds, whitish blue at the edges and a very pretty orange glow fading to cantaloupe at the bottom. A bit more intensity to all the final colors than Perroquet, since a proper dilution here calls for less H2O than its sibling.

Louche
This is opalescence, a nice kaleidoscope of classic louche tones. Great sheen, "glassy" looking. The "weight" and translucence are right at the limits (upper and lower, respectively). Any more, and I would consider this too opaque. For what it's worth, nice action while forming, while it lasts, which is not long due to 56% abv. The show is over at just slightly above 1:1.

Aroma
Unlouched, evident high quality everything... grape base, wormwood and other herbs. Anise is in the background. Louched, well, much the same, with the expansions that water brings. Pontarlier wormwood, in spades, balanced by anise and an earthy fennel just slightly behind. Quite piquant. Subtle pepper (mostly white pepper), camphor, and volatility give it an assertive edge. With a little push in the dilution department (above 3.5:1), the more subtle herbs and florals show themselves. No evidence of alcohol heat, neat or louched.

Flavor
Like the nose, gobs of top-notch wormwood. Anise and fennel are actually plentiful, but the wormwood is so commanding that you might miss them at first. Alternating hints of both white and black pepper. Mouthfeel is amazingly clean and velvety, considering how action-packed this is. As with the nose, the more delicate and subtle herbals and florals reveal themselves at higher dilutions. Focus (as if this needs it!) is provided by a slight trailing mintiness.

Finish
So long it needs another time zone! Seriously... linear, spicy, tingly, minty, and fresh. That awesome Pontarlier wormwood lingers and lingers. A slight "pull" and drying countered by some aspect that prompts salivation, making the finish just juicy. All in all, a vigorous massage for the palate.

Overall
Well, try as I might to resist the hype, I've caved. It's pretty hard to ignore an effort of this level. Assertive and masculine. Stunningly good. A real statement. Absolutely one of the best I've experienced. Profound. Feel free to try different dilutions with this. There has been significant talk on the forums about drinking this at a ratio of 2.5:1 with a little sugar. My favorite dilutions are still 3.5:1 - 4:1. I just find more subtle details and complexities at this level. E. Pernot, of late, has been right in the pocket with their new offerings. This, and its sibling Perroquet, are new to the "must try" list.

Done with a 1 ounce dose, diluted 2.5:1, 3:1, 3.5:1, 4:1 and no sugar.

La Berthe De Joux, 9/11/10, 9/12/10, 9/26/10, 10/15/10, 10/30/10, 10/31/10.
All evaluations had consistent notes.

Some comparisons of Perroquet and La Berthe De Joux

Perroquet is classic peridot.
LBdJ is classic peridot.

Perroquet is all the expected louche tones in the zone.
LbdJ louche is slightly more bluish, slightly more "glassy" looking.

Perroquet is very highly complex.
LBdJ is highly complex.

Perroquet is classic, refined, detailed.
LBdJ pushes limits without going over the top.

Perroquet if you like Bentleys, Vuitton, and Harry Winston.
LBdJ if you like Hummers, Prada, and Chris Aire.

Perroquet for the "pinky out" crowd.
LBdJ for those who have hair on their chest (or those who want some!).

Perroquet - "Polly want a Cracker?"
LBdJ - "Polly want some Crack?"

So... I can't tell you all what a process crafting these two reviews has been. These reviews probably represent the sacrifice of 80% of a bottle of LBdJ, and 65% of a bottle of Perroquet. Recently, in a WS thread, there was some talk about how others impressions of beverages set one up for expectations of what to perceive. I'm as susceptible as anyone, of course. As such, I have parsed these offerings more, and compared more thoroughly to other top-notch absinthes than any other reviews I have written (including tasting short doses of my top 4 or 5 rated absinthes immediately after writing these to serve as a double-check). And I can say that any rating of "4" that either received, was so close to a "5" that I could have knocked it over the line with my heel (the same is probably true with "4" ratings for other top absinthes I've reviewed). Both are stunningly good, both are worthy of any serious absintheur's attention.

Was this review helpful to you? 
Original Review: 8/26/10.
Updated Review: 2/18/11
Updated Review: 9/1/12

2/18/11 Changes: Changed color from 5 to 4. Aside from that, it's just as good as my first review. Fantastic stuff. The color has faded a bit, but it is still very inviting.

9/1/12 Changes: Reduced flavor and aroma to 4.5 each to reflect the half-point system.

Color: (original) Very deep, attractive peridot Updated: A lighter shade of peridot, but still bright green and attractive.

Louche: Nice layering begins around 1:1 which transforms into an inviting green louche with hints of blue, white and yellow.

Aroma: lots and lots of wonderful wormwood with hints of anise and even honey. Wonderfully layered and complex. Room-filling.

Flavor: Spicy and peppery with lots of top notch wormwood. The WW shows through first with a less pronounced but still clearly identifiable anise flavor. Complex and remarkable. Tastes a bit young but it's likely that aging will only improve this absinthe.

Finish: Wormwood plays on the tongue for a good long time with a supporting hand of anise, with just a touch of refreshing alpine astringency at the very end. Peppery and bold.

Overall: A powerful and masculine absinthe that pulls no punches. If your average absinthe is like a Lowlands Scotch, then this is like a powerful Islay. An immediate addition to the list of my top favorites.
Overall rating 
 
4.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.5
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.5
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Brian Robinson August 26, 2010
Last updated: February 19, 2013
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (165)

Unbelievable. Right up my alley.

Original Review: 8/26/10.
Updated Review: 2/18/11
Updated Review: 9/1/12

2/18/11 Changes: Changed color from 5 to 4. Aside from that, it's just as good as my first review. Fantastic stuff. The color has faded a bit, but it is still very inviting.

9/1/12 Changes: Reduced flavor and aroma to 4.5 each to reflect the half-point system.

Color: (original) Very deep, attractive peridot Updated: A lighter shade of peridot, but still bright green and attractive.

Louche: Nice layering begins around 1:1 which transforms into an inviting green louche with hints of blue, white and yellow.

Aroma: lots and lots of wonderful wormwood with hints of anise and even honey. Wonderfully layered and complex. Room-filling.

Flavor: Spicy and peppery with lots of top notch wormwood. The WW shows through first with a less pronounced but still clearly identifiable anise flavor. Complex and remarkable. Tastes a bit young but it's likely that aging will only improve this absinthe.

Finish: Wormwood plays on the tongue for a good long time with a supporting hand of anise, with just a touch of refreshing alpine astringency at the very end. Peppery and bold.

Overall: A powerful and masculine absinthe that pulls no punches. If your average absinthe is like a Lowlands Scotch, then this is like a powerful Islay. An immediate addition to the list of my top favorites.

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User reviews

Average user rating from: 11 user(s)

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Overall rating 
 
4.2
Appearance 
 
4.5  (11)
Louche 
 
4.1  (11)
Aroma 
 
4.2  (11)
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.2  (11)
Finish 
 
4.2  (11)
Overall 
 
4.1  (11)
Coloring is quite pretty as a standard peridot - absolutely proper and traditional. The aroma and taste of Pontarlier wormwood is present and accounted for in a big way... absolutely identifiably Emile Pernot absinthe - powdery and floral. Very, very well balanced with quality ingredients. Delicious. Louche is quite nice - but easy to over water. Best at 3:1 / 3.5/1 as ABV is 56%. Anything higher and you'll be sorry!

This is one absinthe that you really have to pay attention to since it is so very fragile in preparation. Initially, I disliked it as it appeared quite plain to me in terms of flavor - but this is due to my inexperience with the brand and incorrect tempering. It has grown on me quite a bit over time and I now find it to be a wonderful absinthe.
Overall rating 
 
4.2
Appearance 
 
4.5
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.5
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by josephlabrecque November 10, 2013
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (21)

Delicate (fragile?)

Coloring is quite pretty as a standard peridot - absolutely proper and traditional. The aroma and taste of Pontarlier wormwood is present and accounted for in a big way... absolutely identifiably Emile Pernot absinthe - powdery and floral. Very, very well balanced with quality ingredients. Delicious. Louche is quite nice - but easy to over water. Best at 3:1 / 3.5/1 as ABV is 56%. Anything higher and you'll be sorry!

This is one absinthe that you really have to pay attention to since it is so very fragile in preparation. Initially, I disliked it as it appeared quite plain to me in terms of flavor - but this is due to my inexperience with the brand and incorrect tempering. It has grown on me quite a bit over time and I now find it to be a wonderful absinthe.

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Note: Louched at 2.5:1 creating a final drink at 16% ABV despite my usual preference to review at 12-15% ABV. This was done after some brand research and a decision to re-review due to low ABV of 56% for this verte.

Appearance: A clear and bright gemstone green with a hint of yellow.

Louche: Just a bit thin with hues of orange in the body and a nice gradient of blue at the edges. Lots of the original color is left for an overall pastel green body.

Aroma: Wormwood and anise heavy with a nice mint and hyssop background. Some spice notes are displayed as well as a slight medicinal scent.

Flavor: A very silky body with a nice minty wormwood. The anise notes are sharp and crisp. The strange medicinal flavor on the back of my palate is distracting from an otherwise very fresh tasting absinthe.

Finish: Mint, hyssop, and wormwood dance on a field of anise. Unfortunately that medicinal note lasts longer than the rest and dominates the end of this long finish.

Overall: This is a wonderful absinthe with a distracting medicinal feel to it. The mint is a bit heavy for me as well but still not out of line as it tends to be with other minty absinthes.
Overall rating 
 
4.0
Appearance 
 
4.5
Louche 
 
3.5
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Evan Camomile June 12, 2013
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (67)

Was once new.

Note: Louched at 2.5:1 creating a final drink at 16% ABV despite my usual preference to review at 12-15% ABV. This was done after some brand research and a decision to re-review due to low ABV of 56% for this verte.

Appearance: A clear and bright gemstone green with a hint of yellow.

Louche: Just a bit thin with hues of orange in the body and a nice gradient of blue at the edges. Lots of the original color is left for an overall pastel green body.

Aroma: Wormwood and anise heavy with a nice mint and hyssop background. Some spice notes are displayed as well as a slight medicinal scent.

Flavor: A very silky body with a nice minty wormwood. The anise notes are sharp and crisp. The strange medicinal flavor on the back of my palate is distracting from an otherwise very fresh tasting absinthe.

Finish: Mint, hyssop, and wormwood dance on a field of anise. Unfortunately that medicinal note lasts longer than the rest and dominates the end of this long finish.

Overall: This is a wonderful absinthe with a distracting medicinal feel to it. The mint is a bit heavy for me as well but still not out of line as it tends to be with other minty absinthes.

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Review notes: Bottle was purchased in 2010, reviewed today 2/10/13. Bottle has "L3410" on it -possibly a date code. Bottle has been open two weeks prior to review.

Appearance: A soft, pale lime green color, a shade lighter than olive oil. Attractive and elegant, like stained glass. No sediment is visible whatsoever.

Louche: This is difficult due to the fact that there were things I liked about the louche, and others I didn't. When slowly dripping the icewater, opalescent ribbons swirled and shimmered within the absinthe. The final color is a lovely pale green, but it seems very thin, despite the fact that the amount of water I added was even less than the norm. It did not have the look of 'billowing clouds' that I love.

Aroma: When neat, the first trait in the nose that jumps out is how noticeable the grape base is. There's that, coupled with the fennel which provides an earthy foundation, complimenting the powdery sweetness and scent of freshly cut flowers.
Louched, everything seems blended well, with a peppery sharpness like the thorn to the rose of the anise and grape scents.

Flavor & mouthfeel: It's flavor is much more potent and powerful than the aroma suggests! It's remarkably complex, but also balanced. As I take each sip, I am enjoying the wormwood and anise side by side in the very first moment. There's also a dualistic undercurrent of herbal spiciness and delicate floral sweets. Although it's a little 'hot,' I would say it's ultimately medium-bodied. This review was written while tasting the absinthe with sugar added, although after having a second glass without it, the taste is similar, it's great either way!

Finish: The finish is dry and reminiscent of sweet red wine, eucalyptus, and a slight hint of menthol. I can't believe I finished the glass already in the midst of my review.

Overall: My favorite so far out of the recent releases of Distillery Emile Pernot. I prefer this to Perroquet and Vieux Pontarlier. Would be interesting to compare to Doubs or Roquette, but It has been a while since I've had those latter two. Looking forward to trying Sauvage next. Emile Pernot retains its status in my eyes as a top brand.
Overall rating 
 
4.4
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.5
Aroma 
 
4.5
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.5
Overall 
 
4.5
Reviewed by Neorebel February 11, 2013
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (11)

Balanced and complex after resting

Review notes: Bottle was purchased in 2010, reviewed today 2/10/13. Bottle has "L3410" on it -possibly a date code. Bottle has been open two weeks prior to review.

Appearance: A soft, pale lime green color, a shade lighter than olive oil. Attractive and elegant, like stained glass. No sediment is visible whatsoever.

Louche: This is difficult due to the fact that there were things I liked about the louche, and others I didn't. When slowly dripping the icewater, opalescent ribbons swirled and shimmered within the absinthe. The final color is a lovely pale green, but it seems very thin, despite the fact that the amount of water I added was even less than the norm. It did not have the look of 'billowing clouds' that I love.

Aroma: When neat, the first trait in the nose that jumps out is how noticeable the grape base is. There's that, coupled with the fennel which provides an earthy foundation, complimenting the powdery sweetness and scent of freshly cut flowers.
Louched, everything seems blended well, with a peppery sharpness like the thorn to the rose of the anise and grape scents.

Flavor & mouthfeel: It's flavor is much more potent and powerful than the aroma suggests! It's remarkably complex, but also balanced. As I take each sip, I am enjoying the wormwood and anise side by side in the very first moment. There's also a dualistic undercurrent of herbal spiciness and delicate floral sweets. Although it's a little 'hot,' I would say it's ultimately medium-bodied. This review was written while tasting the absinthe with sugar added, although after having a second glass without it, the taste is similar, it's great either way!

Finish: The finish is dry and reminiscent of sweet red wine, eucalyptus, and a slight hint of menthol. I can't believe I finished the glass already in the midst of my review.

Overall: My favorite so far out of the recent releases of Distillery Emile Pernot. I prefer this to Perroquet and Vieux Pontarlier. Would be interesting to compare to Doubs or Roquette, but It has been a while since I've had those latter two. Looking forward to trying Sauvage next. Emile Pernot retains its status in my eyes as a top brand.

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Appearace was typical of an EP product. Perfect peridot, crystal clear. Very clean and practically inviting the water to come in.

Louche was a beauty to behold in the beginning. Try just a splash from a carafe and watch the show. Interweaved threads swirl slowly back and forth in the light green absinthe for probably close to a minute. Mezmerizing to watch. By 1/1 becomes fully clouded.

Aroma of the Berthe neat is vanilla, anise and powdery with the very nice wine base showing through. With water this absinthe opens up into beautiful herbal bliss. Definitely an Emile Pernot product.

Flavor Is perfectly blended. That punchy Pontarlier wormwood bites you on one cheek and kisses you on the other. With a sweet floral softness close behind. Nice summery absinthe. Seems to my tastes just a little bit lighter absinthe than the Vieux Pontarlier. Very nice though.

Finish is lightly sweet and mouthwateringly pleasant. Like chewing a stick of Wrigley's DoubleMint Gum.

Overall a very drinkable absinthe with all the elements in right proportion. Can't go wrong with Big Bad Berthe. Holds it's own among others. Diluted at 3/1 served me best.
Overall rating 
 
4.2
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Songcatcher October 08, 2012
Last updated: March 06, 2014
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (9)

Berthe de Jewel

Appearace was typical of an EP product. Perfect peridot, crystal clear. Very clean and practically inviting the water to come in.

Louche was a beauty to behold in the beginning. Try just a splash from a carafe and watch the show. Interweaved threads swirl slowly back and forth in the light green absinthe for probably close to a minute. Mezmerizing to watch. By 1/1 becomes fully clouded.

Aroma of the Berthe neat is vanilla, anise and powdery with the very nice wine base showing through. With water this absinthe opens up into beautiful herbal bliss. Definitely an Emile Pernot product.

Flavor Is perfectly blended. That punchy Pontarlier wormwood bites you on one cheek and kisses you on the other. With a sweet floral softness close behind. Nice summery absinthe. Seems to my tastes just a little bit lighter absinthe than the Vieux Pontarlier. Very nice though.

Finish is lightly sweet and mouthwateringly pleasant. Like chewing a stick of Wrigley's DoubleMint Gum.

Overall a very drinkable absinthe with all the elements in right proportion. Can't go wrong with Big Bad Berthe. Holds it's own among others. Diluted at 3/1 served me best.

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Straight from the bottle the color is a very natural, deep green color, very leafy, and transparent.

The louche begins with oil trails that are easily visible. It builds out nicely around 1:1 and 2:1. Around 3:1 I noticed it started to thin out and is a little transparent at 4:1 and 4.5:1. It's thinner than I like and that's the only flaw I really have with this absinthe.

Pre-watered aroma is very herbal and clearly an absinthe. It is very reminiscent of the Jades. After water has been added the aroma is more subtle, but notes of wormwood and anise are there. Very nice aroma before and after water.

The flavor is very complex, and suave. Berthe de Joux has a very good wormwood flavor, and the rest of standard absinthe herbs are there was well. I'd call it suave, subtle and reserved. There is some baby powder flavor in this absinthe. It's not over done, but it's noticeable.

There are nice notes of melissa and baby powder on the finish. There are some root like undertones on the finish as well...almost like ginger. Very nice.

This is a very good absinthe, but a little bit reserved. It's very complex and expertly balanced, no flavor really jumps out and dominates more than any others. I think it'd be great everyday, and it's a good standard for defining what absinthe should taste like.
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by baubel June 04, 2011
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (15)

An excellent absinthe

Straight from the bottle the color is a very natural, deep green color, very leafy, and transparent.

The louche begins with oil trails that are easily visible. It builds out nicely around 1:1 and 2:1. Around 3:1 I noticed it started to thin out and is a little transparent at 4:1 and 4.5:1. It's thinner than I like and that's the only flaw I really have with this absinthe.

Pre-watered aroma is very herbal and clearly an absinthe. It is very reminiscent of the Jades. After water has been added the aroma is more subtle, but notes of wormwood and anise are there. Very nice aroma before and after water.

The flavor is very complex, and suave. Berthe de Joux has a very good wormwood flavor, and the rest of standard absinthe herbs are there was well. I'd call it suave, subtle and reserved. There is some baby powder flavor in this absinthe. It's not over done, but it's noticeable.

There are nice notes of melissa and baby powder on the finish. There are some root like undertones on the finish as well...almost like ginger. Very nice.

This is a very good absinthe, but a little bit reserved. It's very complex and expertly balanced, no flavor really jumps out and dominates more than any others. I think it'd be great everyday, and it's a good standard for defining what absinthe should taste like.

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The Berthe de Joux is an absinthe which I can't pretend I didn't receive with some level of expectation, based on its glowing early reviews. Nonetheless, here is my objective review.

The color was acceptable, though not exceptional. I found it to be a composite of green with a strong citrine yellow overtone. All in all, it was fine, but not perfect.

Likewise, the louche was active, but rather short-lived. Again, it certainly didn't set the bar for the category, but neither was it disappointing.

The aroma and flavor are both categories where the BdJ's uniqueness comes into play. The aroma is noteworthy for sure, being far more flowery than anything else which I've experienced. It was nonetheless balanced, but I found the profile to be of narrow appeal, meaning that it would be quite welcome on a warm spring or hot summer day, but certainly not an everyday favorite.

As for the flavor itself, it took me a long while to warm up to it. Fresh out of the new bottle, I found it to be skewed heavily toward an aromatic floweryness, but as the open bottle aged a bit, it mellowed out into a nicely-balanced absinthe in which the fine wormwood was finally able to emerge.

Overall, while the BdJ wasn't able to live up to the gargantuan expectations which early reviews imbued it with, it's still a fine absinthe.
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by jaysthename March 07, 2011
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (19)

Fleur de absinthe

The Berthe de Joux is an absinthe which I can't pretend I didn't receive with some level of expectation, based on its glowing early reviews. Nonetheless, here is my objective review.

The color was acceptable, though not exceptional. I found it to be a composite of green with a strong citrine yellow overtone. All in all, it was fine, but not perfect.

Likewise, the louche was active, but rather short-lived. Again, it certainly didn't set the bar for the category, but neither was it disappointing.

The aroma and flavor are both categories where the BdJ's uniqueness comes into play. The aroma is noteworthy for sure, being far more flowery than anything else which I've experienced. It was nonetheless balanced, but I found the profile to be of narrow appeal, meaning that it would be quite welcome on a warm spring or hot summer day, but certainly not an everyday favorite.

As for the flavor itself, it took me a long while to warm up to it. Fresh out of the new bottle, I found it to be skewed heavily toward an aromatic floweryness, but as the open bottle aged a bit, it mellowed out into a nicely-balanced absinthe in which the fine wormwood was finally able to emerge.

Overall, while the BdJ wasn't able to live up to the gargantuan expectations which early reviews imbued it with, it's still a fine absinthe.

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I am afraid I have to buck the trend on this one.

La Berthe de Joux is very pretty. It pours a lovely peridot green, and louches to an attractive jade, with all the usual visuals. Perhaps the louche is a trifle thin, but not enough to penalize. The aroma before water is pleasant: herbal and fresh, with a bracing tonic scent from the alcohol.

After that first impression, however, I found it rather disappointing.

Aroma, flavor, and finish are all dominated by an intense peppery flavor that tends to obscure the anise and wormwood. This comes as a great surprise to me, as I generally love Emile Pernot's products (including the controversial Roquette 1797). Generally, however, Pernot can be counted on to produce a balanced (or at least nuanced) product. This one lacks subtlety.

Overall, I think it shows promise, but I would rather drink Vieux Pontarlier, the Roquette, or Doubs.

UPDATE: This absinthe has improved considerably since I first opened the bottle...more than I have previously seen with any other brand. While the flavor remains a bit one-dimensional, with "white pepper" dominating all other flavors, it has mellowed a bit and I find I'm enjoying it more. Accordingly, I raised the rating on flavor from 2 to 3.

This is still my least favored offering from Emile Pernot, but overall it will do.
Overall rating 
 
3.5
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Reviewed by marlow December 29, 2010
Last updated: January 24, 2011
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (34)

One-dimensional

I am afraid I have to buck the trend on this one.

La Berthe de Joux is very pretty. It pours a lovely peridot green, and louches to an attractive jade, with all the usual visuals. Perhaps the louche is a trifle thin, but not enough to penalize. The aroma before water is pleasant: herbal and fresh, with a bracing tonic scent from the alcohol.

After that first impression, however, I found it rather disappointing.

Aroma, flavor, and finish are all dominated by an intense peppery flavor that tends to obscure the anise and wormwood. This comes as a great surprise to me, as I generally love Emile Pernot's products (including the controversial Roquette 1797). Generally, however, Pernot can be counted on to produce a balanced (or at least nuanced) product. This one lacks subtlety.

Overall, I think it shows promise, but I would rather drink Vieux Pontarlier, the Roquette, or Doubs.

UPDATE: This absinthe has improved considerably since I first opened the bottle...more than I have previously seen with any other brand. While the flavor remains a bit one-dimensional, with "white pepper" dominating all other flavors, it has mellowed a bit and I find I'm enjoying it more. Accordingly, I raised the rating on flavor from 2 to 3.

This is still my least favored offering from Emile Pernot, but overall it will do.

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colour:
Nice green with yellowish tinge. Reveals a decent and proper colouration what was not always the case as regards Emile Pernot products.

louche:

Delicate louche, at 1:1 leaving an unlouched layer. Green and opalescent. Not too whitish. Opaque enough

aroma:

Fragrant melissa and Pontarlier, non-mistaken, wormwood. Aroma is very fruity and clean. It has the scent of other absinthes from Emile Pernot, but that one is particularly pleasant and inviting. There is a really evident hyssop flowertops note in the middle. Absinthe ain't heavy

Flavour:

It begins with colouring herbs, so melissa, pontica, maybe a little mint and very potent hyssop. There is an interlude for short anise sensation and really powerful wormwood-like smelling the flowering branches-in the finish. Actually, the finish is comprised of 30% spiciness-very delicate, coriander maybe? and 70% top notch strong bitterness.

I have been disappointed with many earlier Emile Pernot offerings, from terrible undercoloured Emiles via decent Wormwood blanche to weak and smelly Roquette or Doubs. This is a milestone and if the Master Distiller does not allow some certain people messing with alembics, the true Art shall emerge from the distillery. Alas.



Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0
Reviewed by absinthist November 05, 2010
Last updated: November 05, 2010
Top 100 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (60)

Pernot can make a verte! Yay!

colour:
Nice green with yellowish tinge. Reveals a decent and proper colouration what was not always the case as regards Emile Pernot products.

louche:

Delicate louche, at 1:1 leaving an unlouched layer. Green and opalescent. Not too whitish. Opaque enough

aroma:

Fragrant melissa and Pontarlier, non-mistaken, wormwood. Aroma is very fruity and clean. It has the scent of other absinthes from Emile Pernot, but that one is particularly pleasant and inviting. There is a really evident hyssop flowertops note in the middle. Absinthe ain't heavy

Flavour:

It begins with colouring herbs, so melissa, pontica, maybe a little mint and very potent hyssop. There is an interlude for short anise sensation and really powerful wormwood-like smelling the flowering branches-in the finish. Actually, the finish is comprised of 30% spiciness-very delicate, coriander maybe? and 70% top notch strong bitterness.

I have been disappointed with many earlier Emile Pernot offerings, from terrible undercoloured Emiles via decent Wormwood blanche to weak and smelly Roquette or Doubs. This is a milestone and if the Master Distiller does not allow some certain people messing with alembics, the true Art shall emerge from the distillery. Alas.



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Color- Deep peridot- spot on with no sediment
Louche- Light green and gold refractions. Not overly thick and some green & gold refractions are present under natural sunlight

Aroma- Wormwood first and foremost. Crisp with hints of fennel. Some flowery notes. I think it’s very expansive though I would like more complexity in my opinion.

Flavor- Wormwood and tea-like hints. Masculine but includes some flowery tones that remind me of L’Italienne. Fruity and velvety at first, then it dies down more crisp and spicy. Not sure if it’s coriander or not but I like it. Extremely complex and rich (with correct watering)

Finish- The finish lasts forever. Fruity wormwood remains concentrated on the middle of the tongue with spicy notes. Very impressive as I’ve found most finishes in other absinthes are anise-heavy to my palate.

Overall- Powerpbacked absinthe. One of the best I’ve tried. I’ll let the bottle age a bit and re-review. I’d recommend picking up a few more bottles for the absinthe cellar.

I’d recommend no more than a 3 to 1 water ratio. It’s still a great absinthe at higher dilutions, but the herbal ‘pop’ might be lost, as indicated by other reviewers.
Overall rating 
 
4.6
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by accountant November 03, 2010
Last updated: November 03, 2010
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (25)

Wormwood forward- Awesome

Color- Deep peridot- spot on with no sediment
Louche- Light green and gold refractions. Not overly thick and some green & gold refractions are present under natural sunlight

Aroma- Wormwood first and foremost. Crisp with hints of fennel. Some flowery notes. I think it’s very expansive though I would like more complexity in my opinion.

Flavor- Wormwood and tea-like hints. Masculine but includes some flowery tones that remind me of L’Italienne. Fruity and velvety at first, then it dies down more crisp and spicy. Not sure if it’s coriander or not but I like it. Extremely complex and rich (with correct watering)

Finish- The finish lasts forever. Fruity wormwood remains concentrated on the middle of the tongue with spicy notes. Very impressive as I’ve found most finishes in other absinthes are anise-heavy to my palate.

Overall- Powerpbacked absinthe. One of the best I’ve tried. I’ll let the bottle age a bit and re-review. I’d recommend picking up a few more bottles for the absinthe cellar.

I’d recommend no more than a 3 to 1 water ratio. It’s still a great absinthe at higher dilutions, but the herbal ‘pop’ might be lost, as indicated by other reviewers.

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Color: A really vibrant lime-green shade of peridot neat.

Louched, much of the green is retained, but there are also hints of copper and blue, giving this absinthe the delightful touch of a Brutalist sculpture by Paul Evans. The louche unfolds with rolling fog banks, and just the right touch of opalescence, and is wonderfully dense, contributing to a creamy, luxurious mouthfeel.


Aroma: Neat, there is almost no hint of harsh alcohol, and a fully developed array of fruity anise and fennel, a wonderful peppery spiciness, and a definite refined blast of minty Pontarlier wormwood.

Louched, this symphonic wonder opens up and fills a room with a perfumed alpine garden that I wish was available in an aroma therapy candle.


Flavor and Finish: As impeccably balanced as the aroma, the flavor is remarkably complex with fruity anise and fennel at first, followed by a very spicy and peppery sensation that is, at the same time, perfumy (almost in the manner of L'Italienne, but more rounded), and the finish is redolent of minty, almost candied Pontarlier wormwood. There's also a very lengthy aftertaste of a touch of semi-dry mead blended with a dash of Juicy Fruit gum. It's a very lingering denouement, and one's palate is left with a sprightly, extremely pleasurable tingling sensation.

Overall: This stunning work of art has eclipsed every absinthe I've tasted, even the best pre-bans. This probably has to do with the freshness, and immediacy of the flavor. Like those pre-bans, I definitely get a textural and slight, positive flavor enhancement from a clearly well chosen wine alcohol base. I concur with Brian that this is a very masculine absinthe, but the bright perfuminess also contributes a playful side that could be just as appealing to women.

This is one of the few absinthes that I consider it no less than an honor to sip and savor.
Overall rating 
 
4.8
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Absomphe September 07, 2010
Last updated: March 28, 2011
Top 500 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (26)

Rhapsody in Green

Color: A really vibrant lime-green shade of peridot neat.

Louched, much of the green is retained, but there are also hints of copper and blue, giving this absinthe the delightful touch of a Brutalist sculpture by Paul Evans. The louche unfolds with rolling fog banks, and just the right touch of opalescence, and is wonderfully dense, contributing to a creamy, luxurious mouthfeel.


Aroma: Neat, there is almost no hint of harsh alcohol, and a fully developed array of fruity anise and fennel, a wonderful peppery spiciness, and a definite refined blast of minty Pontarlier wormwood.

Louched, this symphonic wonder opens up and fills a room with a perfumed alpine garden that I wish was available in an aroma therapy candle.


Flavor and Finish: As impeccably balanced as the aroma, the flavor is remarkably complex with fruity anise and fennel at first, followed by a very spicy and peppery sensation that is, at the same time, perfumy (almost in the manner of L'Italienne, but more rounded), and the finish is redolent of minty, almost candied Pontarlier wormwood. There's also a very lengthy aftertaste of a touch of semi-dry mead blended with a dash of Juicy Fruit gum. It's a very lingering denouement, and one's palate is left with a sprightly, extremely pleasurable tingling sensation.

Overall: This stunning work of art has eclipsed every absinthe I've tasted, even the best pre-bans. This probably has to do with the freshness, and immediacy of the flavor. Like those pre-bans, I definitely get a textural and slight, positive flavor enhancement from a clearly well chosen wine alcohol base. I concur with Brian that this is a very masculine absinthe, but the bright perfuminess also contributes a playful side that could be just as appealing to women.

This is one of the few absinthes that I consider it no less than an honor to sip and savor.

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Edit:


Color: A lovely crystal-clear peridot, Natural and gem-like. When louched, an attractive faint green with yellow and copper highlights.

Louche: The thickness of the louche is just right. Strong winding trails and nice layering, with a steady well-paced build. Distinct thunderous rolling clouds of smoke. Wonderful opalescence and color.

Aroma: A delicious aroma; clean and fresh, no strong nose of alcohol. Mainly wormwood with anise behind. The herbal elements and light spice open up nicely during the addition of water.

Flavor: The flavor is delicious; High quality and well-balanced trinity wrapped in a light pepper, spice and citrus with clear floral elements. A strong personality with wonderfully buffered edges. The grape base is simply wonderful. It IS a wormwood forward absinthe; if you prefer a bit more anise, you may want to try Authentique, also from Pernot.

Finish: A superb layered finish that builds, lingers, unfolds, then fades slowly, leaving a slight citrus tingle at the back of the mouth. One of the very best finishes I've experienced.

Overall: This absinthe takes a classic profile and adds in a floral and herbal personality that makes it very enjoyable. It's a great way to sample a quality wormwood.
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Appearance 
 
4.5
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.5
Finish 
 
4.5
Overall 
 
4.5
Reviewed by Scott M. August 27, 2010
Last updated: January 05, 2013
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (64)

A tribute to wormwood

Edit:


Color: A lovely crystal-clear peridot, Natural and gem-like. When louched, an attractive faint green with yellow and copper highlights.

Louche: The thickness of the louche is just right. Strong winding trails and nice layering, with a steady well-paced build. Distinct thunderous rolling clouds of smoke. Wonderful opalescence and color.

Aroma: A delicious aroma; clean and fresh, no strong nose of alcohol. Mainly wormwood with anise behind. The herbal elements and light spice open up nicely during the addition of water.

Flavor: The flavor is delicious; High quality and well-balanced trinity wrapped in a light pepper, spice and citrus with clear floral elements. A strong personality with wonderfully buffered edges. The grape base is simply wonderful. It IS a wormwood forward absinthe; if you prefer a bit more anise, you may want to try Authentique, also from Pernot.

Finish: A superb layered finish that builds, lingers, unfolds, then fades slowly, leaving a slight citrus tingle at the back of the mouth. One of the very best finishes I've experienced.

Overall: This absinthe takes a classic profile and adds in a floral and herbal personality that makes it very enjoyable. It's a great way to sample a quality wormwood.

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