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6/10/11 Revisit

Over the couple of years since I was so generously gifted this bottle I have noticed some changes in it so I think it deserves a revisiting.

The serpentine colour has dulled to a slightly more olive colour with a couple of years' sitting, but it is still completely appropriate, particularly for its age.

The aroma has opened up to a tremendous degree. It's floral and honeyed, with surprising and delightful tobacco notes. The thick louche is a very attractive, opalescent olivine as before. Water makes the aroma positively room filling with a fruity character. In the glass it's a little anise-forward with a bit of saltiness, but otherwise very balanced. Powdery.

Very big flavour, all traditional absinthe herbs in excellent balance, saltiness on the palate has faded some. The juxtaposition of marine and earthiness has tilted more toward the latter. Citrus is still there but more subdued. More smooth and blended than before. Crisp and refreshing.

The finish is long and dominated by the excellent wormwood. The bitterness has mellowed substantially. Fruity and spicy notes, very nice.

Walton Waters has definitely improved with age.

Original review:

Colour before louche is serpentine, a deep green. Aroma is balanced anise and wormwood. Smells a little salty, but otherwise very classic absinthe aroma. Louche kind of builds everywhere at once instead of bottom-up. It becomes hazy quickly, stays that way for a while, and then is suddenly full. Colour after louche is olivine, not too opaque, not too thin. With water the aroma has become more anise-intensive, with a hint of spice. Smells delicious.

Flavour is both sweet and salty, with a big anise and wormwood punch right off, followed by a fennel earthiness that seems an odd but fitting marriage with its otherwise very oceanic character. The wormwood is excellent and surrounded by fleeting, citrus notes. This is a savoury absinthe, like an herbal entree. Finish is bitter and completely dominated by wormwood. In the end it reminds me briefly of an Imperial Pale Ale's hoppiness. The mouth feel is smooth but not quite the creaminess of the Meadow of Love.

This brings back good memories of many great artisanal absinthes I've tried. And I remember conversations about how there would never be commercial absinthes like them for one reason or another. It just makes me laugh now. I'm excited about American absinthe producers.
Overall rating 
 
4.4
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
4.0
Reviewed by Andrew Young July 08, 2009
Last updated: June 11, 2011
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (60)

Oceanic Absinthe

6/10/11 Revisit

Over the couple of years since I was so generously gifted this bottle I have noticed some changes in it so I think it deserves a revisiting.

The serpentine colour has dulled to a slightly more olive colour with a couple of years' sitting, but it is still completely appropriate, particularly for its age.

The aroma has opened up to a tremendous degree. It's floral and honeyed, with surprising and delightful tobacco notes. The thick louche is a very attractive, opalescent olivine as before. Water makes the aroma positively room filling with a fruity character. In the glass it's a little anise-forward with a bit of saltiness, but otherwise very balanced. Powdery.

Very big flavour, all traditional absinthe herbs in excellent balance, saltiness on the palate has faded some. The juxtaposition of marine and earthiness has tilted more toward the latter. Citrus is still there but more subdued. More smooth and blended than before. Crisp and refreshing.

The finish is long and dominated by the excellent wormwood. The bitterness has mellowed substantially. Fruity and spicy notes, very nice.

Walton Waters has definitely improved with age.

Original review:

Colour before louche is serpentine, a deep green. Aroma is balanced anise and wormwood. Smells a little salty, but otherwise very classic absinthe aroma. Louche kind of builds everywhere at once instead of bottom-up. It becomes hazy quickly, stays that way for a while, and then is suddenly full. Colour after louche is olivine, not too opaque, not too thin. With water the aroma has become more anise-intensive, with a hint of spice. Smells delicious.

Flavour is both sweet and salty, with a big anise and wormwood punch right off, followed by a fennel earthiness that seems an odd but fitting marriage with its otherwise very oceanic character. The wormwood is excellent and surrounded by fleeting, citrus notes. This is a savoury absinthe, like an herbal entree. Finish is bitter and completely dominated by wormwood. In the end it reminds me briefly of an Imperial Pale Ale's hoppiness. The mouth feel is smooth but not quite the creaminess of the Meadow of Love.

This brings back good memories of many great artisanal absinthes I've tried. And I remember conversations about how there would never be commercial absinthes like them for one reason or another. It just makes me laugh now. I'm excited about American absinthe producers.

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