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St. George Absinthe

 
3.2 (2)
 
3.4 (22)
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User reviews

22 reviews

5 stars
 
(0)
 
(9)
 
(10)
 
(3)
1 star
 
(0)
Overall rating 
 
3.4
Appearance 
 
3.5  (22)
Louche 
 
3.4  (22)
Aroma 
 
3.3  (22)
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.3  (22)
Finish 
 
3.6  (22)
Overall 
 
3.4  (22)
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22 results - showing 1 - 5
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Very Enjoyable Absinthe
(Updated: January 03, 2008)
Overall rating 
 
3.8
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0
I've tried this Absinthe on 2 occasions now, unfortunately neither of which was particularly suited to contemplation, so please take this review for what it is worth.



Among the Absinthes I've tried so far, I will give it a 4-ish. Not the best, but well among the upper-mid Absinthes.



The color is on the brown-green side and I find a stronger green more appealing. The Louche is nice, but not as creamy as some of the others I have tried. The best feature is the aroma. Fills the room with a floral complex bouquet. The flavor is spicy and interesting. On the modern side, with the emphasis on the Star Anise and unusual herbs. It is very well distilled on a pleasant and smooth brandy base. Not harsh at all, making it a bit dangerously enjoyable at a 2 or 3 water to Absinthe ratio.



Reading the details of the "overall" criteria, I have to give it more of a "Shows Promise" than an "Almost Perfect", with the caveat that I would like to enjoy it in a more contemplative setting to properly appreciate and evaluate its qualities. I do stronly agree with Shabba, that this is an interesting and unique start for Absinthes produced in the US.
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Quirky and delicious
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
4.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
4.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
5.0
The color is a very attractive feuille-mort. Very clear, bright and natural.



The louche is very fast and the action is not very exciting. A wall of clouds rises up from the bottom, and is complete by about 2 to 1. The louched color, though, is very nice with greener hues than the original color seemed to promise. Looks very rich and creamy to me.



The aroma really knocked me out. There is an amazing bass note of honey, new-mown grass, and clover up front. Later you smell the anise, basil, tarragon, lemon balm. It makes me hungry. I want to eat a giant plate of lasagna and drink the whole bottle. God, I dream about this aroma and wake up wanting more, no kidding.



The flavor is not exactly what the aroma promises. The anise comes on fast with a minty heat and is immediately overtaken by the wormwood. So much for first impressions. If you wait a moment longer the other flavors of basil and tarragon start asserting themselves. The bitterness lingers but is not out of balance. If you believe in the holy trinity of anise, fennel and wormwood, you may find this completely over the top. But I am digging the complexity.



The finish is more abrupt than the aroma. The wormwood bitterness lingers along with a somewhat hot antiseptic taate from the basil, and the alcohol seems a little more predominant at this point than is really desirable.



Overall, this is a *very* interesting departure from the path blazed by the new absinthe distillers. It is astonishingly good with food. Pour an ounce in your spaghetti sauce and you will weep tears of joy. I bought a second bottle right away just to make sure I don't run out. It is definitely quirky, and you may not like it. Or like me, you may find that the aroma penetrates your dreams and drags you back again and again. As others have said, maybe this is a uniquely California take on absinthe, as the Taboo is uniquely Canadian.
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drinkable, but anise dominant
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
3.0
Overall 
 
3.0
I received a 4 oz sample of the St George from a friend. I think it is the second batch. It was diluted 4:1.



The color out of the bottle was a nice amber feuille mort, very nice. Clear, clean, without sediment.



I'm only rating the louche a "3" as it was far too fast, and too heavy. Looking at the finished louche there are some golden highlights within it, and some blueness at the air-water interface. But I just didn't find the louche action itself very interesting. It just went very quickly to a heavy opaque cloud rising from the bottom.



I rated the aroma only "3" again as it really wasn't very strong, or floral. Definitely seems like some alcohol on the aroma and some other notes. But it wasn't something to make you say oh, that's nice, and promise something for when you drink it.



On the flavor, a "3" again. It's mostly star anise, which is much less interesting than green anise, with some brandy notes, and a bit of the other herbs. There's no wormwood to speak of that I can tell. When I took the first sip, swirled it around, chewed it, my response was "That's it?" Lots of tongue numbing from the star anise, but at least it doesn't scrape across the tongue leaving incisions in it's wake like star anise can do. There's no sense of tails, and the drink is quite smooth. So it's very drinkable.



Again a "3" for the finish. Too much star anise, some tingling, a little bit of the mouth saying "yes that's nice". But I can feel that it's fading already. In a couple minutes it may be gone.



Overall a "3". I couldn't find myself giving it a "2" as I did finish my drink. I didn't find it as terrible as my friend. It's somewhat unusual, but I really find the major flaw to be too much reliance on star anise. More AA would be good, but it really seems more like what pastis might be like. Maybe a very good one. I'm not so familiar with pastis so I can't comment further.



If I was going to buy just absinthes available on my local store shelves, I would keep this around. It's certainly well made, and a pleasant, easy to consume drink. If the flavor and finish were more like absinthe, and there were more of those qualities, I'd probably rate it a "4". Because it's so anethole dominant, it probably doesn't seem as weird as some have said. At least not to me.
D
Top 50 Reviewer 6 reviews
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Tasty, in a non-absinthe sort of way.
Overall rating 
 
2.9
Appearance 
 
3.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
3.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
4.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Color: Dark iced-tea color Definitely a deep green-amber hue, as compared to a gold-amber.

Louche: With a slow drip, it transforms without any of the typical louche mechanics (like swirling or clouds, just kinda *becomes* louched.) It layers itself slowly to a opaque, blondish-brown roux color. If louched slightly faster, it develops a bit too fast, and has an olive oil and milk type of appearance.

Aroma: Definitely peculiar. Lots of interesting spice elements, it's not unpleasant, but it's hard to find anything familiar with certainty because of how much is going on with the scent. There's a gravy-like essence (perhaps the tarragon?) and aromas of mint and a bit of mallow.

Flavor: There's definitely an anise "tongue" to it that feels correct, spice and basil...the difference with the star anise is noticeable,

Finish: Not at all unpleasant, feels good in the mouth, but it takes a few seconds for the "whoa!" flavor to subside. The rest of the finish is numb and minty.

Overall: I like it, and it really does taste good...just not like an absinthe. It doesn't seem like a good introduction to absinthe for newbies who don't know what absinthe tastes like just yet...definitely a better 4th or 5th absinthe, just for the sake of tasting something wildly different.
AP
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Certainly Unique
Overall rating 
 
3.2
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
3.0
Aroma 
 
4.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
3.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
3.0
Prepared 3:1 (water:absinthe) with one sugar cube on a slow drip.

The pre-louche color is a deep, rich jade. Well accomplished, to be certain. In examining the bottle there is a bit of visible sediment, which, for me personally, lends to the overall impression of this absinthe as a very ‘earthy’ creation.

The pre-louche aroma is fairly intense, with a fair bit of heat on the nose, but with some pleasant, readily detectable wormwood and an array of other herbs and spices. I wouldn’t describe these as ‘meadow herbs,’ per se, but the overall aroma is something more dark and earthy than woodsy. My guess is that the tarragon is a key component of this.

The louche was speedy, with some decent swirling, but a very quick dissipation – a little too quick for my taste. Nothing remarkable in this department, I’m afraid. The ending color is a decent milky green.

The aroma opens up a bit and softens, post-louche. Some of the more unusual herbs in this earthy concoction are then fairly readily distinguishable.

This absinthe has a truly unique flavor. While it is not at all traditional, it is definitely intriguing. The basil and tarragon are both definitely detectable (perhaps a little too much so), and unfortunately much of the wonderful wormwood I expected based upon the initial aroma gets lost amidst these other herbs in the tasting. Throughout the glass I kept wondering at a particularly mysterious herb flavor, which I could not place. It was almost musty, but not in a bad way. I don’t know how else to describe it other than truly unique, as I had not tasted this in any absinthe before (or in anything else, for that matter). After I finished the glass I went to the bottle to read the list of herbal ingredients – which, by the way, are conveniently printed in nice, bold font on the side of the bottle – in order to determine what this mysterious flavor was. The last herb listed there was ‘stinging nettle,’ and, since I am familiar with the flavor of all the other herbs listed save this one, I can only assume that the unique flavor of this verte comes from the inclusion of the nettle, in addition to the basil and tarragon. The overall flavor, after letting it sit on the tongue a bit, is somewhat rounded out with hyssop, lemon balm and star anise, but, again, the wormwood is buried, which to me is one of the primary faults of this absinthe.

The finish is, unfortunately, rather poor. The tongue-numbing is substantial – a little too substantial to warrant an acceptable rating in this department. The only thing I found at all pleasant about the finish was the aftertaste of that mysterious herb – presumably the stinging nettle. Personally, I found this intriguing enough for it to be enjoyable, despite the otherwise slightly over-heated and excessively numbing components of the finish.

In conclusion, though it certainly has its drawbacks, this is a truly unique absinthe, and worth trying at least once. For me the experience was enjoyable, and while I would not likely spring for a bottle, this seems like a verte that could be well enjoyed from time to time, simply for its unique – if not occasionally puzzling – attributes alone.
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