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Did You Know Absinthe Is ...

Wormwood Society Logo• Not poisonous, and never was?
• Not hallucinogenic, and never was?
• Legal in the USA since the 1960s?
• Not just a novelty? There are fine absinthes, just like fine wine, whisky, and cognac.  Read more here:

 Frequently Asked Questions

 

Preparing Absinthe In Society

Properly preparing a glass of absinthe isn't as complicated as you may think.

Absinthe enthusiasts often refer to absinthe preparation as the "absinthe ritual", but it's not very different from making a cup of tea.

Read more...

 

Absinthe Evaluation Tutorial

Do you know how to tell a great absinthe from a so-so absinthe?  What does one look for, or demand, in a glass of absinthe?  Just as with fine wine, fine absinthe has a whole language and system for evaluation and tasting.

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Doc Herson's Red Absinthe

Doc Herson's Red Absinthe

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2.2
 
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Product Details

Available in USA?
Style/Color
Degrees ABV (% alcohol)
Year of Make (if known)
Country of Origin
Wormwood Society Editor Comments
A red 'American Style' absinthe made in Brooklyn NY.

Editor reviews

Appearance: an inviting deep rouge.

Louche: none. :/ It turns a bit more orange than rouge, but hardly even hazy.

Aroma: Floral and citrussy from the hibiscus. Inviting. Similar to other rouge brands.

Flavor/Mouthfeel: Very thin on the palate. No real absinthe flavor. You get mainly the flavor of the base spirit and hibiscus with a hyper-diluted lemonade type of flavor.

Finish: Again, there's hardly any anise or fennel to be found. Practically no wormwood either. Finish similar to a (very) watered table wine.

Overall: Even for a niche style of absinthe like a rouge, this still departs so significantly from what a real absinthe (even a rouge) should be, that it really shouldn't be looked at as absinthe at all. I pontificated on the merits of these 'low anise' style brands in the review of the Doc Herson's Verte, so I won't go into it again. Suffice it to say, there's no such thing as 'low anise absinthe'. I don't hate the flavor, and I'm sure there will be people who enjoy this. But they'd be lying to themselves if they are thinking they're drinking absinthe. Not recommended for traditional preparation, nor for cocktails.
Overall rating 
 
2.2
Appearance 
 
4.0
Louche 
 
1.0
Aroma 
 
3.5
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
2.0
Finish 
 
2.0
Overall 
 
1.0
Reviewed by Brian Robinson January 01, 2017
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (204)

Disappointed again

Appearance: an inviting deep rouge.

Louche: none. :/ It turns a bit more orange than rouge, but hardly even hazy.

Aroma: Floral and citrussy from the hibiscus. Inviting. Similar to other rouge brands.

Flavor/Mouthfeel: Very thin on the palate. No real absinthe flavor. You get mainly the flavor of the base spirit and hibiscus with a hyper-diluted lemonade type of flavor.

Finish: Again, there's hardly any anise or fennel to be found. Practically no wormwood either. Finish similar to a (very) watered table wine.

Overall: Even for a niche style of absinthe like a rouge, this still departs so significantly from what a real absinthe (even a rouge) should be, that it really shouldn't be looked at as absinthe at all. I pontificated on the merits of these 'low anise' style brands in the review of the Doc Herson's Verte, so I won't go into it again. Suffice it to say, there's no such thing as 'low anise absinthe'. I don't hate the flavor, and I'm sure there will be people who enjoy this. But they'd be lying to themselves if they are thinking they're drinking absinthe. Not recommended for traditional preparation, nor for cocktails.

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