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Did You Know Absinthe Is ...

Wormwood Society Logo• Not poisonous, and never was?
• Not hallucinogenic, and never was?
• Legal in the USA since the 1960s?
• Not just a novelty? There are fine absinthes, just like fine wine, whisky, and cognac.  Read more here:

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Preparing Absinthe In Society

Properly preparing a glass of absinthe isn't as complicated as you may think.

Absinthe enthusiasts often refer to absinthe preparation as the "absinthe ritual", but it's not very different from making a cup of tea.

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Absinthe Evaluation Tutorial

Do you know how to tell a great absinthe from a so-so absinthe?  What does one look for, or demand, in a glass of absinthe?  Just as with fine wine, fine absinthe has a whole language and system for evaluation and tasting.

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Pernod SA - Couvet (Suisse)

Pernod SA - Couvet (Suisse)

 
4.9 (2)
 
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Wormwood Society Editor Comments
The Pernod S.A. distillery in Tarragona, Spain was originally started by the owners of the Edouard Pernod Couvet distillery around 1918 in order to escape the ban on absinthe in Switzerland and France, and used a different recipe than what was later produced by the larger Etablissements Pernod group who took over operations in the 1930s.

Editor reviews

Average editor rating from: 2 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
4.9
Appearance 
 
5.0  (2)
Louche 
 
5.0  (2)
Aroma 
 
4.8  (2)
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0  (2)
Finish 
 
4.8  (2)
Overall 
 
5.0  (2)

Appearance: yellow/dead leaf with greenish hues (it was perfectly stored I guess)

Aroma (before water): aged wine alcohol (exquisitely woody), and green anise.

Louche: excellent, neither too thick nor too light, one can clearly see that no star anise was used in the recipe.

Aroma (after water): woody again. Typically Edouard Pernod.

Flavor: The green anise - of superb quality - immediately delights the palate accompanied by the wine alcohol aged to perfection (the big strength of Edouard Pernod). Right after come notes of various herbs (grand and petite wormwood, hyssop, etc) with a fruity finish.

Mouth feel: Anise and wine alcohol delight the taste buds forever, absolute bliss…

Conclusion : Once again, I can only observe that Edouard Pernod was a step - if not two - above Pernod Fils, no doubt, this absinthe is exactly the same as its elder sister produced in France before the ban (I would not be surprised if in fact it was distilled in France and then bottled in Spain in 1912/1913). It crushes all competitors.
Such a perfectly mastered absinthe commands respect and proves that they were giving a very high importance to every step, from the base alcohol and the herbs to the distillation, coloration and ageing process.

Note: I don’t know the exact absinthe:water ratio I've used but it was no more than 1:2 to 1:2.5.
Overall rating 
 
4.9
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
4.5
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
5.0
Overall 
 
5.0
Reviewed by mthuilli September 04, 2014
Top 50 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (9)

Edouard Pernod was definitely the best!

Appearance: yellow/dead leaf with greenish hues (it was perfectly stored I guess)

Aroma (before water): aged wine alcohol (exquisitely woody), and green anise.

Louche: excellent, neither too thick nor too light, one can clearly see that no star anise was used in the recipe.

Aroma (after water): woody again. Typically Edouard Pernod.

Flavor: The green anise - of superb quality - immediately delights the palate accompanied by the wine alcohol aged to perfection (the big strength of Edouard Pernod). Right after come notes of various herbs (grand and petite wormwood, hyssop, etc) with a fruity finish.

Mouth feel: Anise and wine alcohol delight the taste buds forever, absolute bliss…

Conclusion : Once again, I can only observe that Edouard Pernod was a step - if not two - above Pernod Fils, no doubt, this absinthe is exactly the same as its elder sister produced in France before the ban (I would not be surprised if in fact it was distilled in France and then bottled in Spain in 1912/1913). It crushes all competitors.
Such a perfectly mastered absinthe commands respect and proves that they were giving a very high importance to every step, from the base alcohol and the herbs to the distillation, coloration and ageing process.

Note: I don’t know the exact absinthe:water ratio I've used but it was no more than 1:2 to 1:2.5.

Was this review helpful to you? 
This was the second absinthe tasted in a comparison done on 9-2-14. The other was a Pernod Fils c1910. This bottle was made by Edouard Pernod, which had a slightly spicier and thinner recipe. In the attached pics, the PF1910 is on the left, and the Pernod SA on the right.

Appearance - Clear and bright with light green hues along with the normal fuille morte brown. Lighter than the Pernod Fils; more like a tea than a whiskey. Very attractive.

Louche - Much lighter louche than its Pernod Fils counterpart. Hints of green and white swirled with the blonde fuille morte. Opalescent, but not thick. Fully louched around 3:1, which was also the final ratio.

Aroma - along with the anise and wormwood, there is a distinct floral note that isn't present in the PF1910. Really enjoyable. I could sit and sniff this all day.

Flavor/Mouthfeel - No sugar. Thinner texture on the palate which was refreshing, but still very full flavored. Spicy and herbaceous with the anise being toned down a bit compared to the PF1910. A bit more drying with a touch of citrus and white pepper.

Finish - Slight alcoholic heat on the finish at 3:1, but I was hesitant to add any more water. Nice drying finish, with less anise numbing than the PF1910. I had to take off half a point due to the heat, but I'm really picking nits here.

Overall - This was extremely enjoyable. If I had to make a judgement, I'd say that the PF1910 was more like a 'winter absinthe', while the Pernod SA Couvet is more of a refreshing summer absinthe. Really really good.
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Appearance 
 
5.0
Louche 
 
5.0
Aroma 
 
5.0
Flavor / Mouthfeel 
 
5.0
Finish 
 
4.5
Overall 
 
5.0
Reviewed by Brian Robinson September 02, 2014
Last updated: September 03, 2014
#1 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (208)

A different recipe from Pernod Fils; just as yummy

This was the second absinthe tasted in a comparison done on 9-2-14. The other was a Pernod Fils c1910. This bottle was made by Edouard Pernod, which had a slightly spicier and thinner recipe. In the attached pics, the PF1910 is on the left, and the Pernod SA on the right.

Appearance - Clear and bright with light green hues along with the normal fuille morte brown. Lighter than the Pernod Fils; more like a tea than a whiskey. Very attractive.

Louche - Much lighter louche than its Pernod Fils counterpart. Hints of green and white swirled with the blonde fuille morte. Opalescent, but not thick. Fully louched around 3:1, which was also the final ratio.

Aroma - along with the anise and wormwood, there is a distinct floral note that isn't present in the PF1910. Really enjoyable. I could sit and sniff this all day.

Flavor/Mouthfeel - No sugar. Thinner texture on the palate which was refreshing, but still very full flavored. Spicy and herbaceous with the anise being toned down a bit compared to the PF1910. A bit more drying with a touch of citrus and white pepper.

Finish - Slight alcoholic heat on the finish at 3:1, but I was hesitant to add any more water. Nice drying finish, with less anise numbing than the PF1910. I had to take off half a point due to the heat, but I'm really picking nits here.

Overall - This was extremely enjoyable. If I had to make a judgement, I'd say that the PF1910 was more like a 'winter absinthe', while the Pernod SA Couvet is more of a refreshing summer absinthe. Really really good.

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