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DesertWolf

What ya drinking tonight?

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Nice glass! :thumbup:

 

Like the distinguished gentleman above.....Ike does sound good right about now.

 

I'll have to look at the reviews. B)

 

:cheers:

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Distinguished! Now that's kind. Bill I have been trying to get into the main site to submit my thoughts, but have had a run of bad luck. My password for the forums was too short so, when drinking of course, I made a new one which I promptly forgot. I've been trying to get a new one sent to my e-mail address but it just doesn't come through? I've tried over two dozen times since the Missoula gathering and it ain't happening. I have no idea where the new passwords are being sent but one from Mission liquors didn't get through either, thankfully I remembered that one.

 

Oh well, the Ike is great. :cheers:

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I thought I was the only one to make a password and forget it the next day. :twitchsmile:

(usually while drinking)

 

The Ike was good and now I am drinking a Big Sky IPA.

 

 

 

 

 

By the way, I really like the glass! :cheers:

Edited by LeRoy

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Okay, so, I don't drink beer however, I just had a black lager Sam Adams and it was really, really good!

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Theakston Old Peculiar.

 

Egads, I haven't had one of those since 1982!

 

Does it still have that nice dry molasses finish, and is still packaged in those quirky pull-top cans?

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Don't taunt us! ;) If only such behavior were legal in 'Merica... <sigh>

 

 

It is totally legal.

 

You just need a license from the TTB and your state liquor control board (or whatever it may be called in your state). Getting the license may set you back a few bucks.

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A lavender gibson. But the lavender really needs more time to mellow, that's why I'm preparing another bottle that I can set aside and let age.

 

And now a Twin Tech, which is really a very nice verte.

 

Next I hope to mix up a Plymouth martini, or gibson. I'm stoked that the selections in my tiny corner of the world keep getting bigger.

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Plymouth gibson. I'm satisfied, but this is a whole different taste sensation on the gin front for me. I'll need to do further investigations with it.

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Mmmm, Plymouth martini. My personal martini favorite. :cheers:

 

You just need a license from the TTB and your state liquor control board (or whatever it may be called in your state). Getting the license may set you back a few bucks.

Approximately, $3500 for the state of Montana. I haven't looked beyond that. It seems there are a lot of hoops to jump through.

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That's relatively cheap as these things go. NY is quite inexpensive with a class B-1 Distiller license at only $1450 fee and a $5000 bond. The new D-1 Farm Distiller license is even cheaper, $128. (That's what the bill says; I can't believe it either.)

 

But still lots of hoops to jump through regardless. Only for the foolish or insane, I think. ;)

 

Edit: To correct the price for the Farm Distiller license.

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My first glass of absinthe since late July! Albeit, Toulouse Lautrec, my last bottle of absinthe, it is absinthe, still the same. Not terrible. Not great but not bad. :cheers:

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Tonight it's good old Orange Juice, the IPA isn't cutting it.

I more then a little over did it yesterday/last night..

Haven't done that in a very long time, however I did manage

to bring two new Absinthe drinkers into the world..

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I had a little green and a little yellow Chartreuse, then some PF 1901 and a little bit of some nice white wine. It was in good company. Lots of laughs, unfortunately no new absinthe fans.

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I introduced some newcomers to absinthe tonight at a small wine/food gathering with a visiting artist from Paris. I eased them in with an oil mix, then brought out a bottle of Clb and Blanchette - very successful. The Brevans went over well with some more experienced tasters; the fountain presentation helps. Much fun was had.

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Speaking of spreading the gospel:

I was standing on a country road doing a little wildcrafting yesterday when a gentleman approached me from a near by inn. "Pardon me, I have no proprietary concerns but may I inquire what you're doing?" Proper English with pleasant English accent is not common in Northwest Montana. I knew him as the owner of the inn and he had prepared me more than one martini in the last few months. As it happened I was holding a large handful of Wormwood (big surprise, I know) and after crushing a few leaves and flowers between my fingers, he smelled the fragrant aroma. "Lovely!" He wanted to know what I intended to do with the herbs and I described my tribute garden and affection for the strange beverage. "Absinthe? I've heard of that! Perhaps you'll stop by my inn soon and tell me more about it?" I told him Maggie and I already intended to stop by this coming weekend to hear his new band which has one of my students as a member. "You must be David's drama instructor! Yes, please stop by and if it's possible, perhaps you could arrange a taste of absinthe for me?"

 

:devil:

Oh, yes. I think that may be possible.

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Iced tea with lemon all day, 2 Scotch on the rocks while watching a movie, now back to Iced tea.

Yo MASTERPC :wave2:

Backatcha, OBP!! :cheers:

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A glass of the 1901.

 

I hadn't tried it in about seven months, and I was surprised at how pale it had become...still a vibrant green, just much more subtle, and almost translucent. Also, the anise seemed less assertive, while the fennel, and particularly the wormwood were much more evident. Normally, I'd expect the wormwood to fade a bit (like hops) with the passage of time.

 

I have to say, I like it even more in its present state than I did originally.

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Theakston Old Peculiar.

 

Egads, I haven't had one of those since 1982!

 

Does it still have that nice dry molasses finish, and is still packaged in those quirky pull-top cans?

It came in a dark bottle in a really cool looking six pack. It's aight. Not too molassesy, and the tiny head disappears completely in seconds, but it's an okay tasting brown ale.

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Sounds like it's declined, which seems to be the way of quite a few old British standards.

 

Or worse, they disappear entirely, and reincarnate into atrocities...I still miss Watney's Stingo Ale (over 10%, and a really unique strong dark ale), the "poor man's whiskey", which vanished in the early 80s, only to be replaced with the pitifully bland, and weak Watney's Cream Stout. :thumbdown:

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Sounds like it's declined, which seems to be the way of quite a few old British standards

It got a 90 on Ratebeer's percentile rating thing. It's okay but I don't see how it got that. Or the amount of head in the accompanying photo.

 

In better news, I found a place here that sells Rogue Brutal Bitter on tap for $2 a pint during happy hour. In this area that's the ultimate score. I'll be there every week.

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