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bigwhitt

Stainless steel or not...

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It really is just a matter of taste. When I first started drinking absinthe, I obviously used sugar, sicne it was the way most people did it traditionally. When I started drinking with some other absintheurs who didn't use sugar, I adopted the habit as well, if for no other reason than it was easier for everyone to sample each others drinks. It seemed a bit harsh and harder to detect subtleties at first, but the more I drank it like that, the more I reaquanted my pallete.

 

Same thing with dilution. When I first started drinking absinthe, I watered it way down to make it less harsh on the tongue. Now 3:1 is the upper limit for me (depending on initial strength of course).

 

I can appreciate absinthe prepared both ways now, but I generally prefer unsugared. I've been moving that way in general recently. I don't sugar my tea, I don't drink soda, and recently fruit juice has started seeming a bit too syrupy for my taste.

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Geez... this topic is starting to tilt the political scale.

 

I'm not staunch either way. While I generally prefer my coffee and tea unsweetened, that doesn't mean I won't add a little sweetener when the mood strikes me. It's whatever I feel like. The same applies to absinthe.

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Putting sugar in Absinthe is NO DIFFERENT than Sugaring your Scotch.
Sure it is. They're completely different drinks with entirely different flavors. The ONLY thing they have in common is alcohol.
It masks the flavour of the booze.
Sorry if it does for you, but it doesn't for me. I've tasted it both ways plenty enough times to know. Sugar simply opens the flavors for me.
My point is, if you have to sugar it, perhaps you should not be drinking it. If you do, you certainly are not tasting the Absinthe.
Yep. Only I'm tasting more of it.

 

This is a stupid argument that could be applied to virtually every condiment. I put salt on my French Fries—it doesn't mask the flavor of potatoes, it enhances it. I put sugar on my oatmeal—it doesn't mask the flavor of the oatmeal, it enhances it. I put salt on my eggs—it doesn't mask the flavor of the eggs, it enhances it. I put A-1 on my steak... okay, no I don't, I draw the line at steak. See? There's a pattern evolving here.

 

It's a matter of taste.

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I have to agree with Hiram on this one. Different tongues taste differently and I believe that it is very possible for one individual to find that taste is masked for him or her by sugar (or salt even) while another finds that a certain amount opens the taste profile up on his or her tongue.

 

The older (and possibly wiser) I get, the more I find myself discovering the foolishness of my past reductionalistic black and white views and statements. I find that I am usually safe if I speak for myself and not others.

 

As for myself, I like the taste of most of the good Absinthes I have had without sugar. I use sugar because it tastes good to me like that as well and I like to use a spoon and watch the granules drip into the louche.

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I agree with G&C on this one. A properly made Absinthe should not need to be sugared.

 

The whole spoon and sugar ritual was a promotional gimmick that the Absinthe makers employed to make the drink more attractive to women.

 

It might be interesting to find out how many Absinthe drinkers actually used the sugar cubes back during the day.

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Surprise, surprise. You seem to also agree with G&C that the arguments you join in on do not have to be carefully read. :P

 

I am saying not that a good Absinthe NEEDS to be sugared but, rather, that someone may actually prefer it sugared and not be a unrefined palate noob.

 

Just because I like the girly spoons, by the way, does not mean that I am going to wear a Hiram thong!

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Why?

 

Because I like it better that way. I would not say that it is wrong to take it with water, ice or even sugar. Have it anyway you like it.

I do not even condemn people who likes to set fire on their sugar cube (as long as it is not done at my house :devil: )

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I would hope that any of us, when hosting an event, small party/tasting, get together,etc. would at least have out some spoons and cubes for the guests who wished to prepare their drinks the way they liked them.

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I thought everyone knew that the most evil condiment is Mayonnaise.

 

Blasphemy! Everyone knows it's honey mustard.

What? Even though I do not partake of honey mustard it cannot be considered as evil as mayo. I mean honey is good, one of only two naturally edible substances that extinguish no life when they are harvested or eaten, and mustard, a solid spice to be sure. Mayo, on the other hand, a devilish concoction invented only to lube up a sandwich that people are to lazy to chew and full of enough fat to require a cardiac stint in every packet. There is no special flavour or accent to it just bad for you food lube. No other condiment is as potentially lethal to be sure.

 

Mayo is almost as bad as safety razors and a major contributent to the downfall of modern society.

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I can appreciate absinthe prepared both ways now, but I generally prefer unsugared. I've been moving that way in general recently. I don't sugar my tea, I don't drink soda, and recently fruit juice has started seeming a bit too syrupy for my taste.

 

Too much sour beer :P

 

I agree with G&C on this one. A properly made Absinthe should not need to be sugared.

 

 

 

Well, at least now I know Hiram and the doctors are not one in the same B)

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honey is good, one of only two naturally edible substances that extinguish no life when they are harvested or eaten

What's the other?

 

I was also told by my college "chemistry" professor ( it was a course in the interaction of art materials, hardly real chemistry ) that Beeswax and Gold were the only two substances commonly known to man that are completely inert chemically. Leave a chunk of beeswax and a chunk of gold sitting out, exposed to the elements, and come back in ten thousand years. Assuming they haven't been stolen, they'll be absolutely unchanged, untarnished, not decayed or oxidized in any way. No other substances are as stable. ( changes due to extreme temperatures are another story )

 

As it relates to absinthe, Honey is also wormwood's biblical opposite.

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Good one but I think salt is not considered a "food" in this case. The other is actually milk. I should have said nourishing rather than naturally edible I suppose.

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A properly made Absinthe should not need to be sugared.
Absinthe doesn't need anything, I need my absinthe sugared.

 

We're talking preferences here. It's ludicrous to argue about tastes and opinions. You don't want sugar, don't use it; but don't whinge about other people using it.

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I don't want to whinge about it but I would like to say, that *my* mayo is every bit as good as the ingredients I put into it. And they are damn fine ingredients. Verbally abuse me for clandestine mayo making if you must.

 

I rarely put sugar in my absinthe but the cubes are on the table for my guests. Messin' with the sugar slows down gettin' the absinthe into me.

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I think the exact opposite, sugar masks flavour.  A good absinthe doesn't need any sugar.

 

As for Scotch.  I add spring water at room temp.

It really varies for me.

 

Some absinthes i do like sugar in, but that really depends on my mood. Most of the time I prefer it without; but some really do need the sugar at times. I tend to use quite a bit less sugar (no more than half a cube) than most people i know. Dilution also varies widely depending on the style and my mood. I like that subtle "bite" from the bitterness of the wormwood; and there are times I wish there was a bit more of that. That's the main reason that I like Sebor, even though it isn't really absinthe.

 

There's something kind of... refreshing and tonic about that astringent bitterness; and it keeps the drink from being cloyingly sweet like too many anise-based liquors and liqueurs.

 

Scotch, i tend to prefer served traditionally, neat and slightly above room temperature (in a thistle or snifter glass). However, some of the "rougher" sea-weedy Islay and Island malts do improve dramatically with the addition of a little spring water (again, slightly above room temperature).

 

Can't drink coffee anymore; but when I did it was pretty much milk, no sugar. I like my coffee like I like my women, pale and bitter.

 

Tea... it really depends on the tea. Green teas I tend to drink without anything, though with some of the more bitter types, like matcha, I do like a touch of milk. Same with most Oolongs. Black tea I generally drink with a little milk, but almost never sugar. Pu-ehr (aged) oolongs and blacks I almost invariably drink with both milk and sugar. White teas, of course, should never have anything added; as it is too easy to completely overpower the subtle flavours, and they never really get bitter enough to notice.

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Seems to me it's already a kind of political issue. All we need to do now is pontificate on the spiritual ramifications of sugaring absinthe or not.

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