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Good Absinthe book?


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#1 bigwhitt

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 12:51 AM

I have read Barnaby Conrad III's book, Absinthe:History in a bottle about a million times. I love it and it never really gets old, especially because of the artwork. But I need some new knowledge. Anyone care to suggest a book? Let me know

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Aaron
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#2 hartsmar

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 03:36 AM

Absinthe; A Myth Always Green is a very good book. As well as the books by Mdm Delaheye. The Pernod 200 yrs book is excellent but it only covers the history of the various Pernod brands (no shit).
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#3 Nepenthes

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 07:01 AM

I found The Book of Absinthe to be a much better book to read. The language in A Myth is frequently cryptic at best.
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#4 Wild Bill Turkey

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 08:08 AM

Hideous Absinthe by Jad Adams
Terribly illustrated with a few black and white photos. This is a book for reading, and I think it gets much more in depth than the Barnaby Conrad book. Takes a more honest and realistic look behind the myths and romantic allure of the drink, and takes a more journalistic approach to the relationship between absinthe and art, and artists.
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#5 Gwydion Stone

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 08:44 AM

I found The Book of Absinthe: A Cultural History to be interesting and informative. It not only adresses absinthe in detail, but also a detailed look at the lives of some the more well-known "absinthe drinkers."

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#6 Stroller

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Posted 21 January 2006 - 10:56 PM

Has anyone read Absinthe: The Cocaine of the Nineteenth Century by Doris Lanier

Powell's is carrying a trade paper copy for 32 bucks.

#7 Nepenthes

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 11:49 AM

If you want to read a long rant repeating all of the standard anti-absinthe rhetoric, then it is a good read. Personal, I can't find any reason to have a copy. Why the hardcover is going for $300+ is beyond me. I would be happy to part with mine for $200!
I don't want to take over the world. Just poke at it, make it twitch.

#8 Stroller

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Posted 22 January 2006 - 12:41 PM

That answers my question. I'll keep my 32 bucks.

#9 InAbsinthia

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Posted 01 July 2006 - 08:42 PM

Hideous Absinthe by Jad Adams
Terribly illustrated with a few black and white photos. This is a book for reading, and I think it gets much more in depth than the Barnaby Conrad book. Takes a more honest and realistic look behind the myths and romantic allure of the drink, and takes a more journalistic approach to the relationship between absinthe and art, and artists.


I've just started to read this and I've found it to be somewhat annoying so far. The first few chapters that I've read have a tone of someone writing about some horrible drug that he's glad has been eradicated. And it tends to wander about the place. He also keeps talking about this hideously bitter drink, but none of the absinthes I've tasted so far are bitter in the least.

He does completely shoot down the idea that Ordinaire had anything to do with the original production of absinthe.

Oh, and my copy at least has a set of color plates in it. There are two sets of plates, one black and white and one color.

I hope to be able to comment further on it as I move along in it.
all the green children pine for you
they learned all your secrets and made up your mind for you
although they were unkind to you
all the green children pine for you.
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#10 Guillaume Lanfray

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 07:01 AM

From the Sepulchritude Forum:

Has anyone out there read Doris Lanier's book ABSINTHE - THE COCAINE OF THE NINETEENTH CENTURY? I did & was disappointed. (The title I thought was ludicrous: they didn't have cocaine in the 19th century? Tell it to Sigmund Freud!) It was well-researched to a point, but only to prove her own anti-absinthe point of view. She repeated the story about the Swiss farmer who murdered his family after drinking absinthe, but neglected to mention that the farmer had been drinking other alcoholic drinks heavily all day! Instead of addressing the topic in the scholarly manner one has come to expect in books published by McFarland, as this one was, she acted like an overly zealous D.A.

I'm so glad that I checked it out from a library rather than spending money on it!

#11 Absomphe

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Posted 02 July 2006 - 10:21 AM

Yeah, she's right up with Jad Adams, and Marie Corelli.

Yes, I'm Krinkles the Clown on an absinthe a beer bender.

You got a problem with that?


#12 newtothegreenhour

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Posted 14 September 2006 - 07:01 PM

Speaking of Madam Corelli, Wormwood a Drama in Paris is a great read for a fiction novel. It provides an interesting view of the times, even if it is anti absinthe.
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#13 Nepenthes

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Posted 16 September 2006 - 07:13 PM

Try this book. I highly recommend it. ;)
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#14 plunger

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Posted 19 September 2006 - 07:36 AM

Arrgh..to hard to read with me eyepatch..arrgghh
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#15 slp

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Posted 27 September 2006 - 01:13 PM

[...] As well as the books by Mdm Delaheye.


I really appreciate her books. Right now I have the "L'Absinthe - Son histoire" and the "L'Absinthe - Les Cuillčres". They're richly illustrated and well explained.
Some other books by Madame Delahaye are on their way...


Has anyone read Absinthe: The Cocaine of the Nineteenth Century by Doris Lanier


I bought one just recently. And I'm not yet finished reading it, but I'm not that disappointed about it as some among the members here. I especially like the part about "Verlaine, Rimbaud, Wilde and Others" and "From vanGogh to Picasso" - Whereof the descriptions about vanGogh interest me most.

Does anybody know "The Dedalus Book of Absinthe" written by Phil Baker?

I liked this one as well :)
After the first glass, you see things as they are.
After the second, you see things as they are not.
Finally you see things as they really are,
and that is the most horrible thing in the world
(Oscar Wilde)


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