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EdouardPerneau

New discovery about pernod fils

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Found today on google books :

Citation
Le Pernod était roi, roi d'une autorité universellement reconnue. Il convient de signaler que la maison avait un procédé à elle pour bonifier son produit. Après la distillation, au sortir des alambics, l'absinthe passait dans des foudres immenses
disposés en série, en batterie, communiquant entre eux, mais ne pouvant jamais être vidés qu'aux deux tiers De cette manière, il restait toujours au fond de chacun d'eux une sorte de solution-mère, qui agissait sur la jeune liqueur pour la vieillir.
Chaque bouteille, dit-on, laissait à la maison un bénéfice net de 35 centimes; joli denier si l'on se représente que la production quotidienne était de trente mille bouteilles. Complètement détruite par le feu en 1903, la distillerie avait été entièrement reconstruite;
ce qui lui valait d'avoir un matériel des plus modernes

 

In english: ( rough translation)

 

The pernod was the king, king of an recongnised authority.The maison pernod had an process to get her product better, after distillation,at the end of the alambics, absinthe pass thru gigantic cask dispose in serial ,in batterie ,connecting to each other , but they cannot be emptied to the 2/3 In this way there was always a kind of mother-solution that acted on the young liquor to age it .Each bottle ,leave to the house an net profit of 35 centimes;Nice worth if we think that the daily production was 30000 bottle .Completely destroyed by the fire in 1903, the distillerie was entierely rebuilt with fine edge of technologie material .

I asked to get this full chapter

to be continued ...

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Thank you EdouardPerneau!

Here is the description from Edouard Pernod:
(...) The cooled absinthe is then decanted into large barrels where it is left to improve with age.
Absinthe to be exported is drawn off into casks from these enormous barrels which indefinitely contain the "mother" and which are lined up in rank of age and excellence.
Dictionnaire Universel de Cuisine, 1894 (Delahaye, Pernod 200 years p.111)

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The solera system worked beautifully for Ballantine's Burton Ale (in the thirties and forties), and I could easily imagine it imparting an equally smooth and subtle complexity to Pernod Fils , so I wouldn't be surprised, in the least, if they used such a system for aging (resting) their absinthe. Certainly, the flavors in the various vintages I've tasted, would, to my palate, lend credence to this possibility.

Edited by Absomphe

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Thank you EdouardPerneau!

 

Here is the description from Edouard Pernod:

(...) The cooled absinthe is then decanted into large barrels where it is left to improve with age.

Absinthe to be exported is drawn off into casks from these enormous barrels which indefinitely contain the "mother" and which are lined up in rank of age and excellence.

Dictionnaire Universel de Cuisine, 1894 (Delahaye, Pernod 200 years p.111)

 

 

I posted this original article few years ago . I didn't catch up to the word "mère" ... It's interesting to see that all cask were linked I'm really eager to see what was the protocols to make it .

If they kept the tails ,put the used coloring herbs or no in the still ... some question got answers years later sometimes ... :)

Edited by EdouardPerneau

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