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belewfripp

My Jade Sampler Has Arrived!

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Well, that's certainly a viable perspective, and one that many other people likely share.

 

I would just say that, for my personal opinion, given that the color was itself accidental to begin with (as a byproduct of the herbs added at the end to provide additional flavor and aroma), I don't feel that a color other than the standard verte or blanche would disqualify something from being called absinthe (just so long as the product made is still absinthe in all of the important respects, and not fauxsinthe, liqeur/pastis, etc).

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The existence of red absinthe is historically documented. I tried two red ones: Neuzeller Malvales and Awen Nature Rouge, and I did not like either. There have been some recent reproductions of historical red absinthes, Maitresse Rouge and another I can't remember the name, but they were discontinued.

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The existence of red absinthe is historically documented. I tried two red ones: Neuzeller Malvales and Awen Nature Rouge, and I did not like either. There have been some recent reproductions of historical red absinthes, Maitresse Rouge and another I can't remember the name, but they were discontinued

 

 

Well then it sounds like redsinthe is a wash, as expected. I might be a bit too much old school in such matters, but that's just how I am and I'm too old now to change. And no, the color of absinthe was NOT and accident, it was the outcome of the original method of making it and the herbs that went into the real thing. While there may have been redsinthes made in the past I regard them as abstractions of absinthe rather than real and traditional absinthe, which is all that interests me. I read another post here today about black absinthe, and what a washout that was. There may have even been purplesinthe at some time, but I want nothing to do with that either. To my mind absinthe is either verte or blanche, and that's that.

Edited by Amy Lewis

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Perhaps a better word would have been incidental, but the point remains the same - the herbs were added not with the intention of coloring it green, but with the intention of adding flavor and aroma.

 

Additionally, by the turn of the 20th Century absinthe had certainly already evolved from its origins in the late 18th Century, so trying to freeze it in time and bar further evolution seems arbitrary.

 

Incidentally (pun intended :)), my point is not to try and convince anyone of what they should or shouldn't drink - variety allows everyone to choose what they like best. I'm just offering up a different perspective on the subject.

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The existence of red absinthe is historically documented.

As far as I know there is an advertising poster that may have been a mock up for a product that never made it to market. That's it. No surviving bottles, sales receipts, or recipes from the pre-ban era.

 

If you have other historical documentation of red or rouge absinthe before 1914, I'd love to see it as the idea obsessed me for some time. I'm open to changing my mind but it requires proof.

 

Keep in mind that I gave Adnams Rouge an (almost) stellar review and I'm not totally against reds, but I also don't believe they are historical. I view the popular hibiscus use as a best guess at most. Even back in the day it could have been made red, rose-pink, or whatever with a variety of methods.

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If you have other historical documentation of red or rouge absinthe before 1914, I'd love to see it as the idea obsessed me for some time. I'm open to changing my mind but it requires proof.

No, I'm not that into absinthe as to do historical research on my own. I read much of what's available on the Internet, and also a book by Marie-Claude Delahaye. The existence of red absinthes seems taken for granted, it's an interesting issue you raise. OTOH I'm open to whatever is good quality and good tasting. In spite of this, my experience with Neuzeller and Awen Nature reds has not been satisfactory, I would not buy any more bottles of those reds. A bottle of Adnam is coming this week, I'm glad to know you found it interesting.

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The existence of red absinthe is historically documented.

As far as I know there is an advertising poster that may have been a mock up for a product that never made it to market. That's it. No surviving bottles, sales receipts, or recipes from the pre-ban era.

 

 

 

That would be "Rosinette".poster-- and last month a Rosinette spoon that 'could be' old surfaced on the French forum. That's it. Not a smoking gun proof.

Other than that, Finest and Rarest had a" red absenta" that was Cuban or Spanish I think was dated 20's or later,

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Nice to know, thanks. I knew the poster, but not the spoon. Quite an interesting issue. My preference (but nothing more than that) is that Rosinette actually existed.

 

In any case I'm open to absinthe of any color, as long as it's good and sound :cheerz:

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In any case I'm open to absinthe of any color, as long as it's good and sound :cheerz:

Umm...Hell no. Green and clear are quite enough. Don't need some bubble gum, or cotton candy colored absinthe just so that it appeals to teen age girls thank you very much. You've already got all that with the flavored vodka market.

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Nice to know, thanks. I knew the poster, but not the spoon. Quite an interesting issue. My preference (but nothing more than that) is that Rosinette actually existed.

 

In any case I'm open to absinthe of any color, as long as it's good and sound :cheerz:

 

 

And in some ancient thread someplace, zooming in on the label of the Rosenette, it was determined that the color was was from hibiscus.

Some of the modern rouges use hibiscus, and some don't

 

So using hibiscus was at least a historic idea.

But red just the sake of being red... I'm not at all interested.( JMO)

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To be honest, strictly from a visual/louche perspective, the idea intrigues me.

 

 

 

Umm...Hell no. Green and clear are quite enough. Don't need some bubble gum, or cotton candy colored absinthe just so that it appeals to teen age girls thank you very much. You've already got all that with the flavored vodka market.

 

 

I'm certainly not interested in having absinthe marketed in such a fashion, or for the color being determined for such a reason; however I'm totally fine with experimenting with natural flavor/aroma agents that also add a different color, as long as, echoing Carlo, the absinthe itself is good and sound.

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This thread is full of some ideas and info about rouge absinthe including a breakdown of info on the Rosinette poster.

If you search for rouge, red absinthe, or rosinette I'm sure the forums can dig up some other threads of ancient knowledge as well.

I used to be obsessed with the idea and even have an old draft awaiting publication to my blog called "The Hunt for Red Absinthe". It was never published because I didn't really find anything except for some post-ban products; Red Absenta and the like.

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:laugh: Hadn't thought about that. I even have Peychaud's on hand.

 

EDIT: Although, probably it would have to be a blanche, right? Red + green is just brown. I have that new blanche from Pittsburgh arriving tomorrow, though, so maybe I could mess around with that and see what it looks like.

Edited by belewfripp

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This thread is full of some ideas and info about rouge absinthe including a breakdown of info on the Rosinette poster.

 

Nice to know, thanks. I find red absinthes fascinating, and I'm glad see I'm not the only one.

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