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Leichenwagen

Feuille Morte : What color is it?

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While I know the word translates as "dead leaves". I'd like to pin down what shade or shades that exactly is. The old bottle of Argenti Absinthe I purchased recently is quite a rich color of oily green not unlike a really rich olive oil so I'm pretty sure its not feuille morte.(it may very well be olive oil as I have yet to open it). How might an absinthe change in color over the years and how long might one have to wait before it changes to feuille morte. What exactly is going on with it any way?

 

~Leich

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The colors of Autumn leaves. The Herb Bill responsible for the colors of vertes will slowly break down as the absinthe ages. Its a good thing because that means the absinthe was made using traditional methods. The absinthe's flavor will also benefit from such a long aging process. Thats putting it simple. I'm not much on Organic Chemistry so others will offer a more in depth explaination. Also for those who want to see it in new absinthe check out a bottle of Vieux Carré.

Edited by Cajun Magic

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I have no personal experience, except looking at lots of purty pictures and videos. But the colors do seem to match the various colors of fall leaves, anything from as green as when made, to orange-brown, to a whiskey brown.

 

try an image search on google; or check out you tube videos for "vintage pernod fils". to get an idea.

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Just as original coloration can vary so can the feuille morte effect. St. George goes deep brown while Leopold Bros turns an olive yellow.

 

Chlorophyll breaks down when exposed to light, heat, and oxygen (as do many other substances). To help fight against this, darker bottles are sometimes used.

 

The exact color of feuille morte is as varied as the color of leaves in the fall for the same reason. Chlorophyll and other substances in the leaves break down differently and unevenly when no longer living and exposed to heat, oxygen, and light.

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So it seems rather difficult to determine as so many shades are possible unless you know what the original coloration was. I always thought it was a muddy brown or some other murky color. I would have thought any green coloration would be absent as well,

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