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Georges Meliès

'Bubble' glasses

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There is apparently controversy over bubble glasses, with some people believing that these were never originally used for absinthe. Marie-Claude Delahaye has put that to rest with an amazing discovery: a French patent from 1856 plainly illustrating and describing a bubble glass specifically described as being made for absinthe.

 

The details are on her blog: http://absinthemuseum.auvers.over-blog.com/2015/06/1856-le-verre-gaillard-premier-verre-reservoir-pour-l-absinthe.html

 

Even if you don't read French the illustrations tell a story.

 

Great research!

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Great find! My drinking group gives informal lectures and this will be a topic of my next discussion!

 

Below is the google translation of the blog text.

 

"What we usually call Reservoir glass or Measuring glass or Mixed ball glass seems to date from 1856 as indicated by this trademark entitled Invention of a new system of glass for the mixture of absinthe to the " Water by Charles Jean-Baptiste Gaillard, rue Saint-Claude in Paris.

 

Charles Gaillard proposes two kinds of glasses. Only the idea of ​​the second, simpler, will persist and will be at the origin of all the magnificent measuring glasses that we know.

This glass, figure 1, has two chambers, one A is for absinthe and the second B which is the goblet or cup is for water. The separation of the two chambers is made by a diaphragm, a, made of glass or crystal, and which has at its circumference six, seven, or eight holes, more or less, which connect these two chambers, for the holes are in the molding, and Of pins [...]

 

The second figure represents a glass forming a cup, B, the leg is an egg, A, more or less elongated, this egg is hollow and contains the quantity of the liquid of the other liqueur glasses, below it is the foot; These two capacities have their communication together by its hole, d, about one centimeter in diameter. This opening is rigorously necessary to ensure the function of my glass. "

Figures three four and five represent fixed or movable diaphragms, which I reserve to adapt as I see fit. These diaphragms are at 4, 5 or 6 sides and leave at their circumference openings sufficient for the function of my glass . The center of these diaphragms being full offers a dike to the water which is poured abundantly into the glass. The same applies to fig. 2, which by its shape of cup and the small opening which separates the two compartments the water finds a fairly large surface and can not move precipitously the absinthe which is in the glass.

 

The invention of Charles Jean-Baptiste Gaillard has become a classic and the glass reservoir or drinking glass is the very reference of absinthe glass.Various variants have emerged, presented in the catalogs of glassmakers.

 

Thanks to the INPI for the sharing of their documents which help us to better understand the different technical evolutions and consequently that of the usages and customs. The documents remain the property of the INPI and can not be taken back.

 

Thanks to the INPI for the sharing of their documents which help us to better understand the different technical evolutions and consequently that of the usages and customs. The documents remain the property of the INPI and can not be taken back."

Edited by Strix

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