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So Absinthes.com just opened preorders for a Roquette that's been aged for five years in oak. What's especially interesting is that it is the very first batch that has been aged! I ordered a bottle of Roquette when it was first released; I had just started exploring absinthe. I remember it being very medicinal, the current offerings are tamer in that regard. Now that I've had years to develop my palate I may appreciate it more, I'm not sure. This combined with the five years of oak aging is sure to result in an incredibly unique absinthe, without doubt. What are everyone's thoughts?

 

I will say this- these big releases coming in rapid fire are killing my wallet! First the Terminus, then L'Ancienne, and now this. I'm not sure if I can swing it so close together, my girlfriend will stage an intervention!

 

http://www.absinthes.com/product_info.php?products_id=1190

 

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With so many problems around Pernot absinthes lately - I'm not remotely interested in this. Last bottle of Roquette was garbage and Vieux Pontarlier has been supertails as well. Maybe it is a good absinthe, seeing it is from the first batch... but that distillery isn't getting any more business from me until they provide some verifiable quality control.

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That's upsetting to hear, because I've always been a big fan of Emile Pernot products. My last bottle of Roquette, which I greatly enjoyed, was about a year ago and I've never been a drinker of Vieux Pontarlier. Is this a very recent issue?

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I still have some of that bad batch in question. It's horrible. Enough so to make me extremely Leary of this. Though if it's really from the first batch maybe all is well.

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I feel somewhat validated reading these posts. I had read so many great things about Roquette and was very disappointed with my bottle. It's not good, and I'm reluctant to try the other absinthes from that distillery.

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Snap. Well I won't be ordering any of the current Roquette then until I hear things have improved. Damn, that's a shame.

 

Edit: Hedonist, the Emile Pernot distillery makes some really enjoyable absinthes- Their Authentique and Perroquet are truly excellent and they've had some great releases in the past- like the Sauvage(reportedly, I missed out on this one) and the Doubs Mystique, which I really loved. Hopefully they get back on their game!

Edited by DanPatrick

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Dan, that's what I'm wondering - is it the entire distillery? I've read good things about Authentique, but I'm reluctant to pull the trigger given my experience with Roquette. Is Authentique going to be just another $65 bottle of crap?

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This particular bottling should be fine.

It was distilled in 2010, and is identified as from the first batch.

 

As far as I can tell, the only problems from E.P products are a later batch of Roquette and at least one batch of Vieux Pontarlier, that seem to date sometime about 2012.

I can't find any mention of a seriously flawed batch of other EP's products.

 

As for me, I think that Vieux Pontarlier is probably off my list for years to come.

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Well screw it. I'm pretty excited about a first release Roquette aged in oak for five years- I just ordered it, along with some others. Let's see how it turned out!

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That last post was written while I had Absinthes.com's order screen up in a window and I was debating with myself on whether to do it or not. It was stream-of-consciousness straight to my keyboard- not directed at anyone :)

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I just finished a sample of it. This is what Roquette should be, I loved it when it was new, it was my favorite at the time but the quality slipped and I was critical to those that had a connection to the distillery. This early batch is everything I could hope for, everything that I remember from the past and now sophisticated.

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This is certainly a very expensive bottle. at $132. Wondering if its really worth it. So if Im correct that this is from the original batch and not the most recent one?

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It was originally made in 2007 and released in 2008 so this is not the first batch, this is a batch that was made in 2010 and then during the summer of that year the decision to barrel age it was made. Luckily I was there at the time, getting to see the basement area where all the absinthe is stored for some time before bottling.

As far as being a bit pricey, it is. Is it worth the money ? that is something to be decided you the consumer. Remember the distillery has gone without getting paid for this batch until now and there is a cost to that. I do not think it is a big gamble because of some recent batches, don't think of bottles you may have gotten burned on, think of the bottles of the past that were really good and now it's better.

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There is one problem.

 

They knew about the bad batch and sold it for the same price anyway.

This was dishonest so who cares what they say about this aged batch.

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Rob, thank you for clearing up which batch it is from. I apologize for the misinformation. The reason I said it was the first batch was due to being confused by the description(italics added):

The original Roquette was an experiment: an attempt to try and get back to the roots of absinthe, when it was more herbal elixir than evening beverage.

After the successful creation of Roquette, a new experiment was undertaken, one that would require a lot of patience and tight lips: until this very moment it has remained a closely-guarded secret:

A batch of the original Roquette 1797 was placed in a wooden cask, and carefully stowed in a cool and dark corner of the distillery. Five years later, we have tasted it and can safely declare the experiment a grand success!

 

The amount of years it was aged should clearly have tipped me off though! Ah well, I'm still looking forward to it as I greatly enjoyed the Roquette around 2010.

Edited by DanPatrick

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Should I be worried about the bottle of Absinthe La Maison Fontaine Blanche that I had ordered before seeing this topic? it's made by Emile Pernot but not sold under their brand.

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My re release bottle of Roquette I purchased in late 2013 had no issues.. perhaps the batch after that was bad ..? I have 2 other bottles purchased early and late 2014 unopened.. I loathe to think they will be the bad ones.. anyone else care to share their batch experiences?

Edited by gee13

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Ive just opened a duplicate of the bottle I finished off some months back.. batch L2913 on opening the aroma is divine... louching now... first thoughts coming up..I have another bottle L0414 ...Im worried about that bottle.... and (drumroll) ... theres no issue with batch L2913 ...its as lovely as I first tasted that other bottle almost 2 years ago..

Edited by gee13

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theres no issue with batch L2913

 

That's a relief to read. I checked my one unopened bottle and that's the lot I have. (I can't remember if my first bottle was the same lot or not.)

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You quite miss the point. The point is that they knowingly bottled a bad run. Sold it for the same price. This was wrong. Say a bad run is made. Why not admit it and sell at a discount. This would have been more admirable imo. But now we are to believe anything they say?

Edited by greytail

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Say a bad run is made. Why not admit it and sell at a discount.

 

Personally, I think the admirable thing to do would be to alter it to something acceptable, or if that couldn't be done, just not sell it at all.

 

 

The point is that they knowingly bottled a bad run.

 

I have heard this talked about, but don't know the details. How do we know they did this "knowingly"?

 

 

But now we are to believe anything they say?

 

What are they saying? Any explanation regarding the supposed bad run?

 

What I do know is that, over the years, I have enjoyed a good number of very fine absinthes from this producer. So let's say they made a mistake and released something they shouldn't have. It seems to me that it has been some time and what should really count is what they are doing today.

 

Further, I know I am in possession of bottles of output by at least three other distillers that are highly flawed. Some have been called out in these forums for it and some have never been. To my knowledge, of all these, including Pernot, some were known for this kind of flawed offering(s), and with others, it is an anomaly. What I know about Pernot, specifically, is that this is not the historic mainstream quality level of their production.

 

I'm just sayin' that the tone here, of some, seems just a little "torch and pitchfork" considering their contributions over the last decade.

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I do have knowledge from a reputable distiller. This is how I was informed it was known. I do still have the screen grab from that PM but do. It want to share that in public.

 

I agree that thy could have redistilled that batch.

That is my point about it though. I know it's not popular to be so critical of a product in public like this but this thread popped up and here we are.

 

I've had my day and will let it rest now. I had bought two bottles. I can say that absinthe.com did recompense on one of those bottles. The one I opened I figure is on me since I did not open knowing it would be this way. The second bottle was from that same batch.

 

Anyway. i will pipe down about it now.

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The rest of my opinion is that just like with bad wine, the consumer should be able to push a bad spirit product back uphill.

 

The one I opened I figure is on me since I did not open knowing it would be this way.

 

I don't agree It should necessarily be "on you". You only know a beverage product is flawed upon opening.

 

When a consumer discovers they have a flawed wine (usually corked), all they have to do is return it to the dealer from whom they purchased it and they receive a refund or replacement. The retail dealer then returns for credit or replacement to their distributor and on it goes back up the food chain until it gets back to the producer. And in the case of a corked wine, it's really nobody's fault, including the producer, since they had no way of knowing in advance a particular piece of cork was contaminated. I don't see any reason it should be different with a spirit product.

 

I guess the difficulty with absinthe and this kind of return, with so much commerce being done on-line, is the shipping involved if one is to actually physically return the bottle. If the vendor refunds or replaces the original shipping, the return shipping and picks up the replacement shipping, it's easy to see that would quickly exceed the value of the product. On the other hand, no reputable vendor or producer should ever expect a customer to accept and keep a flawed purchase. And I would also think that all it would take is for a producer to be reimbursing three or four times the original sale value (distillery to distributor or retailer), in shipping, on a few dozen bottles of bad production, and they would be highly motivated to put some serious quality control in place.

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But if the product is flawed, it is not reasonable to expect the consumer to pick that up. For that matter, if the product is flawed, it isn't reasonable to expect the consumer to pick up the shipping that got it there in the first place.

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