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TheGreenOne

The Mead Thread

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I don't think I'll be getting into making mead. It'll take too much time from painting. At least that's the excuse I'm going to use.

It didn't work for me.

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The basic skills in brewing mead (and beer) have other cost-saving applications which can delight the palate. The best root beer, cola, and dozens of other pop flavors are easily made and much healthier than than the store bought garbage. I'm sure there must be other applications, too.

 

Last night we tried a sample bottle of the Elderflower Mead and Blackberry Pyment. The potential is exciting. Clearly, the Elderflower deserves months of patience and it will become very special. As for the Blackberry Pyment, only a few weeks and it will be ready.

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The basic skills in brewing mead (and beer) have other cost-saving applications which can delight the palate. The best root beer, cola, and dozens of other pop flavors are easily made and much healthier than than the store bought garbage. I'm sure there must be other applications, too.

 

Last night we tried a sample bottle of the Elderflower Mead and Blackberry Pyment. The potential is exciting. Clearly, the Elderflower deserves months of patience and it will become very special. As for the Blackberry Pyment, only a few weeks and it will be ready.

 

Sounds delish. :)

 

We used to be very big into beer making, and found that mead was always much easier and less time consuming and had a considerable higher 'friends and spouse' benefit factor to making it. Creativity with additions also seemed to be rewarded more than with homebrewed beer, which I found really is more a craft of finely honed perfection of simple ingredients, much like baking..

 

Our blueberry melomel was simply incredible about 8-12 months after making it, but faded after that. We need to get back into it actually.. So simple, just honey, water, and yeast. And clean production handling, of course. Our local PCC (an organic grocery store) offers honey by the pound pretty affordable. If you go straight to honey producers though, you can make some seriously cheap mead that's high high quality.

 

Plus, it's rumored to have magical powers.. [insert dramatic music here] :)

 

Cheers,

John

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Minor point of protocol, GPB: No need to quote the previous post. Everyone will get your meaning. Sometimes you may want to quote a specific part of the previous post to help clarify your comments. For example...

 

 

We used to be very big into beer making, and found that mead was always much easier and less time consuming and had a considerable higher 'friends and spouse' benefit factor to making it. Creativity with additions also seemed to be rewarded more than with homebrewed beer, which I found really is more a craft of finely honed perfection of simple ingredients, much like baking.

 

I couldn't have said that better myself! :cheers:

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I just filled 27 bottles with Raspberry Mead. It does have Raspberries in it.

 

The Cranberry Mead is almost ready for the bottles, too.

 

mmmmm, T73's rasberry mead is excellent, even when licked off the walls/celing :P

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Zman, I'd make a batch just for you for that. But there's people here whose mead I'm sure would put my newbie stuff to shame, though I enjoy it.

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I just barely made it!

 

4 1/2 gallons of Cranberry Mead (with organic Cranberry juice, not Cranberry honey) just went into the bottles. I saved 1 1/2 gallons for Thanksgiving's Cranberry Mead/Champaign punch. The mead is Cranberry tart and very dry but I'm sure, plenty of residual sugar to allow for conditioning in the bottle. By Christmas, it'll be "Brut Dry" and effervescent. If I can keep some hidden away from Maggie, it will be a very special treat next Thanksgiving. ;)

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Time sure does fly, doesn't? Thanks Alyssa & SP! :cheers:

Getting ready for the Thanksgiving Party, I found a near perfect Cranberry Mead/Champaign fountain:

Mead_Fountain.jpg

 

"Please allow Frosty to piss you a glass of punch?" :devil:

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Awesome, T73.

 

Not long ago my girlfriend said, "I wonder if cranberry mead would be good." I told her that you were making some, so now she wants me to.

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I am so excited. I just racked the cherry mead that was born on T73's birthday. It is turning out so much more wonderfully that I imagined. The color is gorgeous. It is a beautiful golden color with just a blush of pink. It has great bubbles, and already tastes pretty dang super-good, and this was just the first rack! I am going to let it sit a bit longer, then bottle in about 2 weeks (in theory). I gave a little bit to eat, and wrapped it up to keep warm. Now for the waiting - again. We are thinking of a honeydew mead next. :cheers:

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Well, I lost all of my March mead.

 

Maybe you all can help me here.

I made the batch(plain) on 18 March. It went through 2 rackings and was left to bulk age until a month or 2 ago(so for 6-7 months). It went straight into Grolsch bottles, no priming sugar, no carbonation on my part.

 

On the weekend after Thanksgiving, my folks came over to take the kids camping. I opened a bottle for them, and was lucky that it hadn't exploded in my hands-it shot everywhere.

 

We had opened several others before hand, and though they were fizzy, only had that pleasant "pop" sound when opened-no big explosion.

I went through every bottle to make sure we didn't have bombs. The majority of them did the same thing. Why were they all so over-carbed? What did I do wrong?

 

It was delicious, with fine bubbles, but it all had to be drank then and there.

 

Please advise.

 

amy

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Assuming there was not a wild yeast infection, the only other thought would be, being bottled too soon. Sometimes you can bleed the carbonation out by burping the bottles (Grolsch bottles are great for that). The best way is waiting and waiting and waiting before you bottle.

 

I don't think it would effect the outcome but I never rack my mead. Once it goes into the carboy, it stays there until it goes into the bottle. Lot's of people choose to rack mead but I think they just want to fuss with it. On the other hand, I can't imagine racking would do any damage, either. Good luck! :cheers:

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The only reason I rack my mead is to make absolutely damn sure I get the last of the yeast out of it before I bottle. I want my mead to shine like justice.

Edited by Martin Lake

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Maybe you all can help me here.

I made the batch(plain) on 18 March. It went through 2 rackings and was left to bulk age until a month or 2 ago(so for 6-7 months). It went straight into Grolsch bottles, no priming sugar, no carbonation on my part.

 

On the weekend after Thanksgiving, my folks came over to take the kids camping. I opened a bottle for them, and was lucky that it hadn't exploded in my hands-it shot everywhere.

Six or seven months can be enough for mead to ferment out, but it might just as well take way longer.

 

To find out whether it has fermented out, don't count months but see if there is any activity in the airlock. If not, try waiting a couple of months more to see if it takes off again. You may also take some gravity readings with a few weeks' interval to see if it has stabilized, but I've never done that. I rely on gut feeling and patience. Some kind of chemical fermentation stopper can be used as a substitute for the latter. Or use the Grolsch bottles, but be sure to let them burp every now and then.

 

The latest one I've been bottling was started last december and did finally appear to have fermented out about a month ago. It seemed to be ready around July, and I was just about to bottle it, when it took off bubbling again.

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You may also take some gravity readings with a few weeks' interval to see if it has stabilized, but I've never done that. I rely on gut feeling and patience.

 

Ah yes! Another artist. :dev-cheers:

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I rely on gut feeling and patience.

 

Well, unfortunately apparently, I do the same.

I did use Grolsch bottles, but I not know to burp them. Now I do. Thanks for the excellent tip, and back to the drawing baord! :cheers:

I think I'll go again on New Years Eve, and in April for our 10 year anniversary.

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SP, I'm sorry to hear about your March Mead. There is not much more exciting or frightening than exploding mead.

 

Beware the Ginger Mead. bruwhahhahaha :devil:

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I use hydrometer readings to confirm my gut for everything...

 

Same here, and if my final reading was below 1.000, I knew I'd achieved pretty close to the desired attentuation of the mead.

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