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billnchristy

My "barrel aged" absinthe experiment

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As for absinthe, it totally depends on the brand and the abv. Everyone's mileage will vary. For example, Barrique was aged for 2 years, I believe.

 

Now I can say that you are wrong! :twitchsmile: Well, not entirely. The Bugnon Barrique first sold on Alandia may have been aged about 2 years. But the product you and I tasted at Tales last year and that you reviewed later is aged for six years.

That's where I got messed up. For some reason, I had it in my head that the Alandia Barrique was aged for 6 months, and yours for 2 years.

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The Alandia site (it is no longer stocked) states "Matured for one year," although I believe they may have had further supplies aged for longer.

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Aw man. I've been away for a minute, and come back to more of the same. Meh. And looky looky, someone yelling at Brian again.

 

My commercial release of the Clandestine Barrique is still under lock and key at a dear friend's home. The sample I had with Alan when it was bout 4 years old was super delicious. I'm sad I never got to try the older Duplais Barrique. But all of that can be fixed with some oak chips or a small barrel, right? *pisses on beehive*

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And looky looky, someone yelling at Brian again.

It's been too long. Needs to happen every once in a while, right?

 

I still have about half a bottle of the old Barrique if you want a sample.

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See, I got mad at Brian in this thread, because not only do I not have batches of bitters going right now, I haven't even thought about starting to barrel age the fuckers yet. Bastard. :tongue:

 

Jack, your barrels evaporate less because of a chemical reaction in your home due to all your cats. It has to do with the ammonia in the air, albeit tiny amounts, from the 27 litter boxes. The ammonia interacts with the now-hardened resins in the wood, acting as a solvent of sorts, by fusing on a molecular level, with the crystalized resins hidden in the pores. This creating an almost turpentine-like substance that re-seals the wood's pores, on a more complete level than the initial kiln-drying did, during the manufacturing of said barrels. This, believe it or not, reduces the evaporation to about 8-10%, so there...you guys actually agree! Glad to be of service.

 

Eww!

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Gotta be careful aging bitters though, as the wood can leech out too much of the bitter flavor. I tend to keep some spare bitter blend out of the barrel in case I need to add a bit more in after it comes out of the barrel.

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