Jump to content
stefan084

which Jade should I try next?

Recommended Posts

for christmas i got 2 new absinthes, Jade 1901 and Roquette. i like both but really love the 1901. i think they put some kind of addictive chemical in the Jade. it has a smell and taste that is so different to what i've tried so far (pac,mol,ww,vc,ital,ancienne,ridge,emp. norton) i will obv. be trying all the Jades but it gets expensive, so what should i try next? thinking Edouard but i'm intrigued by the salty bayou-ness of the Nouvelle Orleans--any suggestions are appreciated

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tough call. I absolutely love them all, but I lean to the Edouard. Until I drink the NO. Or the PF1901.....

 

But seriously, if I had to pick one, it would be Edouard. That's right at the pinnacle of my personal favorites. But your mileage may differ, which is one of the many joys of absinthe.

 

Still, even if you ultimately may end up preferring PF1901 or NO, for sure you won't be disappointed with Edouard. It is great absinthe by any measure. They are all different, all terrific.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Edouard is the best. All in all I don't care for the Jades, but I like that one. I taste some bizarre flavours in them that not everyone else does, and those flavours somehow work for Edouard while they work against the others. PF1901 is my least favourite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

peridot what are you tasting in the Jades? i am curious because i also taste something unusual in the 1901 (i like it though) but i don't have the ability to describe it. so far my ability to differentiate between absinthe would be something like --(vieux carre- too spearminty for me) (pacifique and ridge--very woodsy, love it) (l'italienne--too perfumy) etc

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Carbonization (caramel and chocolate flavours), male human underarm sweat (similar to cumin) and, just in NO, salt. Not as in a salty taste, but the flavour of salt. The Jades taste very dark and murky to me, as opposed to the bright, crisp freshness of absinthes I tend to prefer. The sweat is least prominent in Edouard, and the darkness works for it. I also think the first Belle Amie (haven't had any of the later batches) is very dark tasting, but delicious. But on the whole I prefer things that taste like a sunny summer afternoon (Ridge, Meadow of Love) more than things that taste like a warm fireplace on a winter night (Edouard.) If that makes any sense.

 

My five year old bottle of Lucid has the sweat something fierce. Some people taste it, others don't; it's like the soapy flavour some people taste in cilantro.

 

Taste memory has faded a little bit. Having to reacquaint myself with a couple things here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good choice. It would be mine as well. I first tried the jade line in 2005, close to it's public inception. I do remember them tasting much better then. Some of what peridot describes is due to the base, pont. WW and obviously trade mark secrets. Are they representative of a truly authentic tasting absinthe prior to the ban like the claim says? Who can say, but Edouard is my favorite of the four.

Edited by greytail

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Until I finish my time machine (damn, I've been working on it for 50 years now!) I won't be able to know what absinthe tasted like back in the day. I am assuming that the better survivng pre-bans have changed relatively little in the past century, but then again just because they are high in alcohol doesn't mean they don't change with age. Just look at the color....

 

Anyway, I can say that the Gempp-Pernod I tasted on Christmas, which presumably was made using the same (or very similar) recipe as Gempp's father-in-law Édouard Pernod, showed astonishing similarities to the modern Édouard in body, texture, and balance. Not identical, but definitely in the family.

 

That may not prove that the Jade is "authentic" to the original flavors, but it sure evokes some of the character of a fine pre-ban as tasted today. And for a lot less money. That's enough in my book. So I'm in 100% agreement with Songcatcher: when I'm having a glass it does "take me back" and I savor the experience. (Using antique glassware and having my walls covered with original Belle Époque posters helps.) ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always fun to pretend I guess. Just the other day I enjoyed a cheap glass of marsala all the while envisioning drinking Dorwinion wine from Frodo Baggin's cellar, while reading Fellowship of the Rings.

 

Dorwinion it was not though.

 

 

Btw, I would never presume to claim what I say is absolute fact, so weigh that with the salt. That said, absinthe is not wine.

Edited by greytail

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Until I finish my time machine (damn, I've been working on it for 50 years now!) I won't be able to know what absinthe tasted like back in the day.

A few of us were lucky enough to taste Pernod Fils "very green", a number of years ago, and it was so well preserved that it ​must​ have closely approximated what fresh pre-ban top marque absinthe tasted like. While all the Jades exhibit some striking similarities to the above, the marc base that Ted uses exhibits a noticeable muskiness (some have called it "funk", others a "burnt" characteristic) that is completely absent from the PF "very green", and, I suspect, from any other quality marque of the Belle Epoque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good choice. It would be mine as well. I first tried the jade line in 2005, close to it's public inception. I do remember them tasting much better then. Some of what peridot describes is due to the base, pont. WW and obviously trade mark secrets. Are they representative of a truly authentic tasting absinthe prior to the ban like the claim says? Who can say, but Edouard is my favorite of the four.

 

Pretty sure it's not the Pontarlier wormwood causing the flavours I spoke of. I really enjoy that wormwood in other absinthes, and it has a character that jumps out at me. I've always assumed it was the base causing Jade funk, because I remember Blanche de Fougerolles being really sweaty, too, and that had a similar base if I'm not mistaken.

 

Before I had preban, Edouard was how I imagined preban would taste. Then I had 1910 Pernod Fils and, despite sharing some auxiliary similarities, the difference in character was absolute and overwhelming. Edouard was dark, heavy, and kind of reminded me of homemade chocolate chip cookies. Pernod Fils was shockingly summery and crisp. It took me aback.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well after reading some of this i'm looking to spend my christmas cash on a preban pernod fils sample. i've been checking out the usual sites but haven't seen any (i've seen some other preban samples but not pf) don't know if it's worth it but i have to try it so i can make the comparison myself

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

agreed peridot, my concerns are 1. it's two glasses vs two bottles and i hope i'll be able to tell the difference between the old stuff and the new 2. if i do love the old stuff i can't afford it very often and i'll always be let down by modern absinthe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No. You will be able to tell the difference.

Sure, might not seem like a wise investment, but think of this. Once all the pre-ban is gone, it's gone.

You can do small tastings.

 

 

No, you will still like modern absinthe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you're right greytail, once it's gone it's gone--so i officially have some pernod fils 1914 headed my way. i'm very excited!!although it got me wondering why modern absinthe makers aren't able to replicate the best absinthe of the past. they have the same or better equipment i would think. also why doesn't pernod go back to the old recipe if it was so popular? oh well.....now i play the waiting game......hmm hmm hmm whaah ha ha ha ha (maniacal laugh)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are some great questions there that we have bandied about for years.

 

I don't think Pernod care$, yet. The ab$inthe market i$ tiny and for now, there i$ not much intere$t.

 

It's not the equipment. Just like 100+ years ago, we have better and worse equipment. In some cases, we have the exact same equipment.

 

Some folks contend that the herbs have changed. I don't buy that completely even though I will agree that different herbs make some difference.

 

Maybe it's the technique. Maybe...

 

Time is ultimately a two-fold force that I believe is the key: First, we are trying to recapture in the last decade what the distillers of your Pernod Fils sample had developed over a century of experience and believe me, we are still learning. Every absinthe batch is another learning opportunity. The final aspect of Time is the gentle aging process and without the benefit of a time machine to go back to 1914, we cannot know exactly what your sample would have tasted like fresh from the shelf. Nor, without the time machine can we know exactly what today's absinthe will taste like in 2114. I think we are continuing to learn and improve. I can assure you, Marc and Gwydion are not sitting on their hands but looking to improve with every trip into the distillery and every year, we get a little better. I have tried one prototype that came so close to the taste, feel and aroma that I did an immediate double-take because it was so frighteningly close to 100 year old absinthe. We are all still beginners here, learning an art that was almost lost. Stick around 'cuz the best is yet to come.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why can't the absinthe of the past be replicated? Well, my thought on that, with the caveat that I'm not a distiller, is that it's a combination of age (100 years in the bottle can't be matched by modern absinthes) and the fact that no absinthes by modern producers taste the same as each other either. There's a lot of room in the world for different absinthes, and trying to perfectly replicate a dead brand is less interesting to me at least than making something new and amazing. I mean, it's not like every preban brand tasted the same, either. If everyone was duplicating preban absinthes there would be a lot of great absinthe in the world to drink, but my favourite modern brands wouldn't exist.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

update: sipping on Pernod Fils 1914--....trying to regain composure......not sure how to describe...lack descriptive powers...must....take another sip...powdery and irresistible ...smell is something out of a dream....must......focus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of all the Jades, my experience is Eddy has almost always got the highest raves, the NO I think is a tad darker, muddy and Earthy but still good,what an encompassing idea it would be to decide to divide it all in two,;just split it up and draw a boundry; a modern and a vintage tasting setting, then you'll have a stage thats proper for both, and you'll educate all involved correctly in the two worlds..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×