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Good Starter Books


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#1 gee13

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:57 PM

So whats a good starter to some easy general reading on absinthe sociocultural history etc thats inexpensive?

 

Ive found a book by Barnaby Conrad and another by PHil Baker. Any good?

 

Any ones other recommendations would be good. Im not looking for any heavy reading or complex socio political conspiro-progaganda theoretical analyses at this stage.. 



#2 Evan Camomile

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 08:06 AM

I hear news about an updated Absinthe Encyclopedia which is what I'm waiting for.

 

Alan reviews books from time to time on his blog.

 

Most books came out a while ago and are in desperate need of an update. Especially the ones published before 2007.


Edited by Evan Camomile, 31 July 2013 - 08:06 AM.

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#3 Brian Robinson

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 08:37 AM

The Conrad book has some glaring inaccuracies, but it's still a rather good read.


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#4 Georges Meliès

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 01:00 PM

I enjoyed the Barnaby Conrad book a lot when it came out in 1988, but less so when I re-read it last month. There's a bit too much about the mythology and alleged psychotropic effects. Still, it can be found fairly inexpensively and is worth reading.

 

I bought Marie-Claude Delahaye's very compact English edition of "Absinthe, The Living Legend" and regret it given the high price and lean amount of useful information. Half of the book reads like an infomercial for Fée Verte. Not much substance there.

 

I have her spoon book on order but I'm sure that's in a very different category. That's about as specialized as it gets.

 

I definitely recommend "Encylopedia of Absinthe" by David Nathan-Meister. It is not really in the form of an encyclopedia but it is packed with good information and great photos. However it is expensive, though if you shop around you'll find that prices vary wildly. Hunt for the best price you can get. That said, a lot of what is in the book is exactly the same as in the online 'virtual museum'. If you spend enough time surfing that site you'll read much of the same text and see the same pictures. But I am a book freak so I appreciate having it all in compact form that I can pick up and read leisurely on the couch anytime I feel like it.

 

Scott M's book on absinthe antiques is an absolute must if you have any interest in the accouterments.

 

I'm still waiting for a comprehensive new edition of a book that will bring the story further up to date. There's a ton of information on this forum that post-dates any of the books I'm aware of. Clearly there's a need for such an updated book today.


Edited by Georges Meliès, 31 July 2013 - 01:01 PM.

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#5 Alan Moss

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 01:12 PM

This forum is that book ..


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#6 fingerpickinblue

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 01:17 PM

Good point.

 

I enjoyed both the Conrad and the Baker books. When reading them you just have to put them in perspective with the time they were written and temper your "knowledge" with other sources.


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#7 gee13

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 05:28 PM

Many thanks I will indeed check out these recommendations. What would be great is a book that has some older photos of everyday life in the Belle Epoque era. Last night I watched a documentary on 100 year history of Le Tour and they had some video footage of the races and things that happened around the time of the turn of the century. I swear there was a segment where some riders were in a bar circa 1900-10 and in the background absinthe was being consumed.



#8 Brian Robinson

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 05:53 PM

That would be the absinthe encyclopedia. Tons of pics.
Answers to common newcomer questions.

List of WS articles from across the web.


Help other absintheurs and newcomers by submitting a review. Click here to go to the main review page to submit your entry.

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#9 gee13

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 06:57 PM

Cheers Brian!

 

Anyone care to share the best place to get this from that I dont have to pay an arm and leg to down under?

 

Im going to start searching anyway but any advice appreciated! :thumbup:




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