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BBC Radio "Absinthe Makes the Art Grow Fonder"


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#1 TheLoucheyMonster!

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Posted 19 July 2013 - 12:27 PM

A  radio program on BBC4, 30 min. from yesterday.

Interviews with:

George Rowley

Marie-Claude Delahaye

Jad Adams

and others.

 

So expect a lot of 'same old thing' from those sources. (some BS and half-truths) 

 

QUOTE

The novelist and poet Michèle Roberts presents a history of absinthe, and its influence on art and writing.

Toulouse-Lautrec,
Verlaine, Van Gogh, Gauguin, Oscar Wilde and Hemingway - all are united
by their love of absinthe. In the late C19th it became so popular that
5pm, when absinthe was served, became known as 'the Green Hour'.

Artists
celebrated this bitter-sweet, aperitif. The way it changes from clear
green to milky white with the addition of water is an alcoholic metaphor
for inspiration and artistic transformation. But absinthe is very
strong, and was thought to be hallucinogenic.

Artists' subjects
and modes of expression changed radically in the later C19th. Artists
and writers seemed to pursue lives of reckless extremity. Michèle
investigates how all this became associated with absinthe. A symbol of
the demi-monde, 'the green fairy' was demonised and banned in much of
Europe (including in France), and America. At first an aid to
inspiration, did absinthe lead to fondness, in the Shakespearian sense
of foolishness? Did absinthe make the art grow fonder?

Michèle
meets George Rowley, absinthe entrepreneur, who initiates her into the
rituals of its consumption and Marie-Claude Delahaye of the absinthe
museum in Auvers-sur-Oise, where Van Gogh lived, who helped Rowley
recreate absinthe using old recipes. The historian Jad Adams and
Pataphysician Kevin Jackson explain the myths surrounding the spirit;
its rise, decline and fall - and recent resurgence. Barnaby Wright of
the Courtauld Institute explores the fascination of absinthe for the
young Picasso. And, under its influence, Michèle writes a poem. Maurice
Riordan, editor of Poetry Review, judges whether absinthe inspires or
wrecks her work.

Listen here

http://www.bbc.co.uk...rammes/b036w39g

 

 

 



#2 King_Stannis

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 06:26 AM

Still trying to wrap my head around someone being considered an expert in a food or beverage while not ever consuming the thing they are supposed to be an expert in.
"The king's brothers are the ones giving Cersei sleepless nights...Lord Stannis in particular. His claim is the true one, he is known for his prowess as a battle commander, and he is utterly without mercy. There is no creature on earth half so terrifying as a truly just man." - Varys

#3 Brian Robinson

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 07:18 AM

I'm not sure why that belief is still around. MCD does drink absinthe. I (along with a few others here) have drank it with her. She doesn't drink a lot, but she does drink it.
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#4 Georges Meliès

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 07:19 AM

Agreed. I just watched the documentary the other night, and aside from the usual "hallucinogetic" nonsense I thought it was pretty well done. But my jaw hit the floor near the end when Marie-Claude Delahaye admitted that she never drinks any alcohol. :shock:  Sure, she can know about the history, but drinking it is an absolutely integral part of the whole story -- especially if she is "an advisor" to a distiller making absinthe.

 

EDIT: I was posting at the same time as Brian so my comment referred back to King_Stannis.

 

MCD said twice in the documentary that she doesn't drink. I took those statements at face value.


Edited by Georges Meliès, 20 July 2013 - 07:20 AM.


#5 Brian Robinson

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 07:23 AM

I'm also not sure why she keeps saying herself that she doesn't drink. I don't know what her angle is there, but it sure is confusing,
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#6 Songcatcher

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 08:22 AM

I sure do like that glass.  :)

 

And I love Radio 4.  :cheers:


The room it smelled heavy of drinkin',  

and the sad silent song, made the hour twice as long,

as I waited for that sun to go sinkin'.


#7 gee13

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 05:11 AM

She didnt Inhale..



#8 King_Stannis

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 01:14 PM

She didnt Inhale..


Hehe. :D
"The king's brothers are the ones giving Cersei sleepless nights...Lord Stannis in particular. His claim is the true one, he is known for his prowess as a battle commander, and he is utterly without mercy. There is no creature on earth half so terrifying as a truly just man." - Varys

#9 Songcatcher

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 03:44 PM

Her name was 'Skip'. :dev-cheers:


The room it smelled heavy of drinkin',  

and the sad silent song, made the hour twice as long,

as I waited for that sun to go sinkin'.



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