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TheLoucheyMonster!

WS, Canadian Distilleries

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On the positive side, the article seems to be reasonably well written. Tyler Schramm does point out that the name for his absinthe comes from the name of the root bark that is part of his formula; anyone who chooses to read "evil and forbidden" in the name is free to make an underinformed judgment. Kudos for the mention of The Wormwood Society.

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" Tyler Schramm does point out that the name for his absinthe comes from the name of the root bark that is part of his formula; anyone who chooses to read "evil and forbidden" in the name is free to make an underinformed judgment."

 

Underinformed judgement? I think not. There's no way I can believe that they were not trying to play on the nefarious mystique and hype that surrounds absinthe. Look at the label. A picture of a devil? C'mon get serious.

I do agree that the article was well-written.

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I'm with Marc on this one.

 

Try to imagine what it would be like if other spirits were marketed using imagery and ideas based on the worst parts of their history. We'd have Wife-Beater Whiskey and Whipcracker Rum.

 

How can we ever expect the rest of the world to take absinthe seriously as long as producers continue to treat it like a novelty?

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What concerns me is that they referred to Thujone as psychoactive. I thought that this aspect of Thujone had been disproven. It just perpetuates the myth.

 

"Absinthe is flavoured with a variety of botanicals that include anise, fennel and Artemisia absinthium, better known as grand wormwood. This bitter herb contains a psychoactive ingredient called thujone, which is said to cause hallucinations. However, thujone is present only in minuscule amounts, far too small to have any real impact. In fact, you'll find more of the stuff in Parmesan cheese. Any hallucinations you experience are far more likely to be the result of absinthe's high alcohol content, which can be as high as 75 per cent."

 

To small to have impact but if I buy the stuff that markets itself as high inThujone, I will get an impact?

 

I personally am less concerned with the naming than I am to the quoted passage about the Thujone content.

 

Just saying.

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I remember the "firestorm" here a few years ago when Okanagan (Taboo) sent out a Christmas email that included a photo of burning absinthe. My feeling then, as now, is: Lighten up. Mansinthe has found acceptance in the absinthe mainstream in spite of its presentation and the notoriety of Marilyn Manson. How about a rum named after Ron Jeremy? It's out there, as are many other liquors, good and bad, that play the marketing game in a way that some disapprove of. Marc and G, your products are superb, so they tell me, but I can't get them here. Nore can I get the vast majority of absinthes that Americans have the luxury of taking for granted. Don't be so discouraging to those few Canadians producers who are trying to do something north of the border. By the way, check out the awards Okanagan has won recently for their products, including Taboo.

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What concerns me is that they referred to Thujone as psychoactive. I thought that this aspect of Thujone had been disproven. It just perpetuates the myth.

Thujone (aka :chop: ) is psychoactive in (really) large amounts... as a convulsant that easily penetrates the blood-brain barrier. It targets GABA alpha receptors.

 

The myth is that it has any other properties, like hallucinations. It's also funny how many other herbs and plants and even food has thujone without anyone batting an eye, even regulatory agencies. For some reason people get all excited about wormwood but it's the same damn chemical no matter the source. I never heard parmesan cheese as a source like the article states but it wouldn't surprise me that such a naturally occurring chemical would be found there as well.

 

The more you understand the porkchop, the less the porkchop matters.

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I was wondering that as well.

Maybe Sage Derby is a possibility.

 

My vote is for Cashel Blue: The yellow creaminess of the cheese with blue of the mold gives you green!

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" Tyler Schramm does point out that the name for his absinthe comes from the name of the root bark that is part of his formula; anyone who chooses to read "evil and forbidden" in the name is free to make an underinformed judgment."

 

Underinformed judgement? I think not. There's no way I can believe that they were not trying to play on the nefarious mystique and hype that surrounds absinthe. Look at the label. A picture of a devil? C'mon get serious.

I do agree that the article was well-written.

The figure on the front of our bottle is "The Devil's Club Man" an important figure in Pacific Northwest first Nations folklore that help to protect against the over harvesting of this important plant. The artwork was prepared for us by Whistler tattoo artist and friend Dave "Pepe" Petko and follows in line with our other spirits where we have had other local artists feature their work on our bottles.

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Thanks for the info, Tyler. My family spent several summers on the BC coast and we fell in love with the local culture. I am looking forward to a bottle of your absinthe finding a place on my shelf. :cheers:

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