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Matt S

Importing American Absinthe Into Australia

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Exactly. We can see this in other classes of spirits as well. Some craft whiskeys are out of this world, others I want to throw out of this world.

 

As I said in my post, just like with craft beer movement we are bound to get a wide range.

 

Getting this thread back on topic a bit (not totally) I hear these Aussies just sourced some of the best American wormwood (in the world according to myself an maybe a few others) for their absinthe. I can't wait to see how it grows in their gardens.

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Yes this is great news. I'd say the New South Wales central coast is probably quite a bit warmer than Montana or Pontarlier or any of the other great wormwood growing areas so that might pose a problem but these guys apparently know their herbs (hence the name Distillery Botanica) so hopefully they will be able to compensate for that somehow. Their first commercial batch of Reverie, which used wormwood from a small scale producer in Tasmania (big island to the south of the Australian continent for those unfamiliar with Australian geography), was great and won a silver medal at the International Wine and Spirits Competition in London. So with Joe's wormwood it will be hopefully even better. Hopefully some of you will get to try it at some point

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I am sincerely excited by the prospects of getting to try it and hope for the very best.

 

Being a die-hard optimist, I look forward to a new Australian variety of Artemisia absinthium (erina.nsw) that takes the absinthe world by storm. Perhaps, we will all start using Shipitto very soon.

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Hah! That will piss-off the Swiss! :biggrin:

Wouldnt the Blue Mountains be good Wormwood growing territory

Why not? The elevation and climate during the growing season seem to be similar to Montana.

BlueMountains_zps9cfc67a2.jpg

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So long as you don't lose your crop to bushfires!

 

Joe, just out of curiosity, what sort of conditions are necessary or ideal for wormwood cultivation?

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Honestly, I don't know. I can tell you that our altitude is at 3500' and the valley is about 500' less. Summers are hot and dry. Spring and Autumn are cool and wet. Winters are not bitter but cold with (usually) lots of snow. The wormwood thrives here and in the valley as does the other alpine herbs we grow (Jules keeps trying to give away my "weeds," meaning Artemisia pontica because it is so damn prolific).

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It would take quite a bit for Ridge and Marteau to top Cheryls distill.

 

Luscious Oily Lesbians!. Not in my book.

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@ Ron ..Well thats probably because you have tried them? and I havent. And based on what Ive tried of Walton Waters its a damn fine absinthe and what I meant was that it would take a much better one to beat it. Unless of course youre one that doesnt rate Walton Waters highly.

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WW and MoL are two finely made absinthes, with my preference of the two leaning toward WW. As a matter of fact, I should get into my bottles of them again soon. Bit dusty.

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It's very easy for me to brag about the outstanding quality of US absinthe and I certainly include Delaware Phoenix in that praise. At some level, it's not a matter of "better or best" but personal preference and fortunately, we have a nice collection of distillers achieving that level.

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Honestly, I don't know. I can tell you that our altitude is at 3500' and the valley is about 500' less. Summers are hot and dry. Spring and Autumn are cool and wet. Winters are not bitter but cold with (usually) lots of snow. The wormwood thrives here and in the valley as does the other alpine herbs we grow (Jules keeps trying to give away my "weeds," meaning Artemisia pontica because it is so damn prolific).

 

I don't know how similar that is to anywhere on the east coast of NSW, Summers are hot but not necessarily dry, and while the winter feels cold to me I think most Europeans, Canadians and those from the northern half of the US would find it pretty mild, certainly no snow.

 

 

Look forward to trying your produce Joe. I wonder if we are one of the first to try US varieties in Australia.

 

No way to know, but we can certainly claim the title in the absence of any evidence to contradict the claim

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