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StoutYeoman

How important is the slow drip?

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Hello, everyone.

 

I am a newcomer to absinthe and I'm still getting the hang of serving it. I find that I don't always have the patience to slowly drip the water in... more than one measure of water has been hastily dumped in.

 

On that note, I've noticed that when I take the time to let the water slowly drip in I get a much more complex flavor than when the water goes in quickly; is it just my imagination or is there some science behind this? I made a hasty glass the other day and all I got was good 'n plenty, but no herbal or floral flavors at all. The other night when I enjoyed a few glasses after slowly adding the water I felt like I tasted a much more complex flavor. It was like two different drinks.

 

Am I out of my mind or is the way the water is added really that important? How fast/slow should the drip be? Is there a standard like 1 oz. per 60 sec. or something like that?

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Some will say it doesn't matter. i say, why rush it. Enjoy the preperation. I believe after experimenting, that a slow drip produces a better louche and aids in letting the oils come out of suspension at a slower rate. i think it lends to a better tasting draught too.

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A slow drip does wonders for expanding the threshold of the nuanced flavors. It opens up more! Do it to your liking and experiment maybe,there is really no perfect ratio for the perfect Absinthe. It's subjective. :cheers:

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You're not out of your mind, StoutYeoman, that's exactly why water is added slowly. A slow drip actually allows the plant oils to more completely come out of solution and therefore enhances the complexity of flavor. But there's no need to be super-slow about it, a drizzle or thin stream is sufficient. Watch this.

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Some of the members here might remember a long discussion I had with Meatwagon about this very topic, including a non-scientific comparison of the same absinthe, prepared both ways. The difference in louche was noticeable even in a photo.

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I agree with G. I have found that the slow drizzle works great. I use a party cup with a pin prick in it. i set it over my glass, pour in the measured ratio and forget it till it's ready. Works for me.

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Golden Means are subjective when it comes to ratio is all I'm saying. Ratio and drip are two different things I know but as brian said they both matter. Nobody mentioned ratios except me. I just had ratios on the mind.

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Also try to make sure that the water is cold. You don't need to freeze it or anything, but humans taste differently at different temperatures. Taste a glass really slowly and see how it changes as it warms up.

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When Julie mentioned how a slower louche yields a creamier mouthfeel, I began to be more careful about it. She was correct, of course.

 

Just the difference between my two see-saw drippers makes a huge noticeable difference. With the slower and taller Lucid dripper, I found the same absinthe tasting creamier, sweeter, 'fuller' even, with more nuances and bolder flavors.

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A slow drip does wonders for expanding the threshold of the nuanced flavors. It opens up more! Do it to your liking and experiment maybe,there is really no perfect ratio for the perfect Absinthe. It's subjective. :cheers:

I disagree. Ratio and rate of drip are two different things. Ratio can make or break a particular marc.

 

Ratio and rate of drip are different things, but Cajun Magic is right. There is no such thing as a "perfect" ratio for a particular brand of absinthe (just as there's no such thing as a "perfect" rate of drip, or a "perfect" water temperature). Sure, you can ruin a glass of absinthe by completely overwatering it (or underwatering it), but is there a specific ratio to which a brand must be watered to hit some Platonic ideal? Nah. There's a loose ratio range that may be ideal depending on its ABV, sure, but not an exact ratio. Water and taste until it suits your palate. Done and done.

Edited by AiO

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I think there is a near perfect ratio for at least 3 particular brands on my shelf at the moment. Near perfect because give or take a few drops of water, it isn't as noticeable.

 

This is subjective of course to my palate and may not be perfect for yours, so in the end it is a matter of personal prefs.

Edited by greytail

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There's a loose ratio range that may be ideal depending on its ABV, sure, but not an exact ratio. Water and taste until it suits your palate. Done and done.

 

 

...so in the end it is a matter of personal prefs.

 

Yep and yep.

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I've gotten out of power louching, onacuz I felt I was cheating myself from fully experiencing my absinthes. Considering the price for a good bottle, that felt like a shame.

 

What I love about dripers, is they make louching easier than power louching. Just dump the water in the tank, and go about your business, while the slish-splash reminds you that your absinthe is being louched to perfection.

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I believe adding water to absinthe is like making love to a woman. After all, the fairy lives in the absinthe, and the water lures her out. So some times you take your time, enjoy every nuance,every taste and every scent, Gaze lovingly while enjoying every moment. :heart: :twitchsmile: :shifty:

 

And sometimes you just wanna get down to business! :headbang: :dev-cheers:

 

So it all really depends on the mood you're in at the time.

 

And that's all I got to say about that. ;)

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Thanks everyone!

 

up until now I've been using a shot glass and painstakingly holding it over the glass while the water drips out. You can imagine how one might become impatient. Some of your improvised drippers are really brilliant! I just ordered an inexpensive brollieur from loveoffrance.com, I hope that it does the trick! I improved an absinthe spoon out of steel pie server. It works well.

 

Thanks for all your answers!

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I'm enough of a donkey that I have a travel dripper I bring with me everywhere. I took the cap from a bottle of water, heated the tip of a knife, then melted a small hole through the center of the cap. I keep it in my messenger bag. Now, anywhere I go, all I need to do is get a bottle of water, put on the special cap, and drip away. :)

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Smart idea Brian, will keep that in mind for my trips.

 

I still have my measuring cup dripper, but it is hard to beat the see-saw drippers for every day use. Especially the easy of use, and performance of the Lucid one.

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You don't even have to go to that trouble, just buy one of those water bottles that have those pull-tops... whatever they're called... you know, the ones made for runners that you have to squeeze or suck on. Makes a perfect dripper when traveling. I use one at home too when I want a quickie and don't want to bother loading up the fountain.

Edited by crow

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I think the Lucid dripper would work fine without the see-saw. The flowrate is regulated by the hole, the see-saw just provides the water in plops. The height would have two benefits, you can use a spoon, and speed the water has when it hits the drink, helps mix things.

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:laf: Decorating my absinthe ware display where I dump all the things that are too delicate, impratical, or un-needed. I need a ladder to get to it.

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