Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
TheLoucheyMonster!

Antica Sambuca -sinthe

Recommended Posts

The spirit, with an ABV of 38 per cent, combines classic Italian sambuca with the botanicals that give absinthe its characteristic flavour: wormwood, green anise and fennel......

 

Jeremy Hill, chairman of Hi-Spirits, said: “Absinthe is an iconic spirit, but it also has a reputation which many people find daunting. By combining the flavours of absinthe with Antica Sambuca we’ve created a far more accessible spirit – it’s absinthe with a safety net.

 

For you fraidy cats that need a safety net ? Antica-Absinthe2.jpg

 

:hysterical2:

Um, I can add my own water.

 

 

 

Antica Absinthe Sambuca is distilled using traditional Italian techniques and authentic ingredients

Does that mean authentic oily mix flavors and authentic artifical colors?

 

no thanks

 

http://barmagazine.co.uk/absinthe-added-to-sambuca-range/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I completely fail to understand the negative reaction to this drink. It very clearly says it's a Sambuca, with absinthe flavor added.

Makes me think of people just looking for something to sneer at. And it's not the drink that leaves with the bad impression.

 

Jo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“Antica Absinthe balances the sweetness of an authentic sambuca with the characteristic bitterness of absinthe."

 

 

We are reacting negatively to it for several reasons.

 

1) Absinthe shouldn't be bitter. The producers seem to be unfamiliar with authentic absinthe. It implies maceration sans distillation.

 

2) The color. It looks like mouthwash. It screams yellow #5 and low quality. And again, maceration without distillation.

 

3) The concept of absinthe with training wheels. It implies that real absinthe takes years of knowledge and experience before one can enjoy it. Or you need to be a complete alcoholic to drink it at 68% alcohol. It's a bit insulting, uninformed, and will turn new comers to the absinthe world away.

 

I'm sure there's more I'm missing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It clearly has the word "Absinthe" as part of the fanciful name on the label.

The large print at the top of the web page says

"Absinthe added to sambuca range"

 

The uninformed may buy it, and think they are getting an absinthe.

 

And I totally sneer at the marketing copy "absinthe with a safety net".

Absinthe does not need a safety net. You add water, and it is as strong as you make it.

 

If someone actually wants a sambuca with artificial looking color and 'absinthe flavoring' of dubious origin, then they can have at it, and enjoy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

“Antica Absinthe balances the sweetness of an authentic sambuca with the characteristic bitterness of absinthe."

 

1) Absinthe shouldn't be bitter.

 

2) The color. It screams yellow #5 and low quality.

 

3) The concept of absinthe with training wheels. It implies that real absinthe takes years of knowledge and experience before one can enjoy it.

 

The uninformed may buy it, and think they are getting an absinthe.

 

And I totally sneer at the marketing copy "absinthe with a safety net".

Absinthe does not need a safety net.

 

Plus an FDC Blue or two there, Optional.

 

Jo, the problem with all this is that it asks for a passive agreement from the consumer to buy into the falsehoods proffered in their packaging and marketing. It does no favors to the efforts of those who are trying to spread the true word about absinthe. And unlike vodka, there is no common practice of "flavored" sambucas, other than these guys. I must say, though, they are consistent. Browse through their other flavors to see every colo(u)r not found in nature (the Mandarin is especially shocking).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, all the stuff you are nasty about is stuff you perceive is "implied" absolutely none of it is actually based on fact.

While nothing on the web can be considered "true" ... I find that this company is well respected, very clear that sambuca is made from star anise from china, infused and then distilled. ... and used all natural color and flavorings. The absinthe word on the bottle is identical to the flavor listing for every single one of their other sambuca blends

 

The slightest amount of fact checking would have given you enough information to know that other than the sales gimmicks, everything you've all said is pure imagination if not libel, and totally irresponsible.

 

http://www.admiralimports.com/s_Antica_Sambuca.html

 

http://www.youngsmarket.com/index.php/news/article/introducing-antica-sambuca-from-the-heart-of-italys-veneto-region

 

Not liking a sales gimmick doesn't provide an excuse to attack the product with lies.

 

Jo

Edited by JoPatterson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
:thumbdown: Well they are not buying me. The FAKE COLORING and "Absinthe With a Safety Net" slogan is distasteful. Please show me an Absinthe or Chatreuse that color jo. How is that honest advertisement. I know it doesn't claim to be Absinthe,but the way this company handles this product grinds my gears. Edited by Cajun Magic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to side with Jo on this one. While it's obvious that they created this flavor to tap the absinthe trend, so what? That's what branding companies do. And not just with booze. Watch the trends in fruit juices: early on it was carrot everything, a brief flirtation with mangosteen, then green tea, then pomegranate, then acai. Right now it's all about coconut water.

 

It's unrealistic to think that absinthe will somehow be immune to this; it's just the way the business works. There are always going to be superficial, brand-driven products. At least they're not trying to pass it off as actual absinthe, and they did what they should have done: they called it "absinthe flavored".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, all the stuff you are nasty about is stuff you perceive is "implied" absolutely none of it is actually based on fact.

 

I'm not going to assume whom you are addressing here, but I don't see anyone being "nasty". And also there are a number of things responded to here that were stated, not implied.

 

Sambuca does not have to adhere to your perceptions ... and they can flavor their sambuca with anything they want to,

I think you all are way too free with your imaginations to the point of slanderous defamation and totally lacking in any sort of fact checking.

 

None of us are here primarily to educate about sambuca, however we are here to educate about absinthe and protect it from the predatory practices of those seeking only to profiteer from it. I think you need to do a little fact checking. For instance:

 

While nothing on the web can be considered "true" ...

 

I can't agree with that. It's a pretty extreme position.

 

I find that this company is well respected, very clear that sambuca is made from star anise from china, infused and then distilled. ... and used all natural color and flavorings.

 

Respected by whom, and for what? They would not be respected by any knowledgeable person with regard to their absinthe selection. Here is the review page at Fee Verte. There are no reviews here. I don't see where the statement "infused and then distilled" is, and if you think any of those flavors I linked are "all natural coloring", you got some learnin' to do.

 

You don't like Sambuca's sales technique, big deal, doesn't give you the right to lie about their product.

 

Jo

 

I also don't see where anyone is "lying" about their product. There have been some reasonable opinions expressed, based on reasonable assumptions that can be made from all the data available. Jo, there are some pretty sharp knives in the drawer here, some of which have been around the block a time or two.

 

Personally, I'm not saying this product doesn't have a right to exist, I'm just saying that it concerns me because it will probably only create more confusion with the actual category, and it does nothing to further the understanding of genuine absinthe.

 

All that said, I noticed you have not yet posted an introductory thread. Why not shake it over to the Newcomer Section and tell us a little about yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

1) Absinthe shouldn't be bitter. The producers seem to be unfamiliar with authentic absinthe. It implies maceration sans distillation.

 

 

You are soooo drinking absinthe waayyyy above my price bracket... sigh

Most of the reviews for the absinthe I've bought have mentions of "bitterness" , usually attributed to the wormwood i think.

bitter woody taste, bitterness fades to flowery ... stuff like that.

 

Should I be jealous ... green eyes, for the green goddess?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's what branding companies do. And not just with booze.

 

It's unrealistic to think that absinthe will somehow be immune to this; it's just the way the business works. There are always going to be superficial, brand-driven products. At least they're not trying to pass it off as actual absinthe, and they did what they should have done: they called it "absinthe flavored".

 

Yep, that's what they do. But just because they called it "absinthe flavored" doesn't mean that it excuses any false or dubious labeling, marketing, and statements by the Wig ala Big about genuine absinthe in efforts to sell this. That's where we should come in. I side with those concerned about the following, among other things:

 

“We’re launching to coincide with the start of the new university year, and we’re already getting strong interest from operators of student venues and town centre bars".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I implied in the IP that the flavor comes from an oil mix. They clearly state on the website:

The anise alcolate is prepared in our own distillery .....Essential oils extracted from the distillation under steam of the Star Anise.

It sure looks to me as they are describing how they make their own essential oil extract.. good for them.

 

They say 'traditional Italian techniques'

The history so far with Italian absinthe is that most, or nearly all of them use essential oil in the making. And you can still get away with calling it 'all natural flavoring'.

And most have artificial coloring.

 

And I can't find anything about natural color.

The black sambuca? what spirit is naturally black?

If this' absinthe- like' product is naturally colored please show.

 

 

What I find most objectionable is the marketing, even more than the product. I think it goes almost to the point of predatory.

“We’re launching to coincide with the start of the new university year, and we’re already getting strong interest from operators of student venues and town centre bars.

 

Marketing translation = We want to prey upon the most curios and least informed segment we can find. :blowup:

 

A good product will market to the educated consumer.

A bad product relies on ignorance.

 

As for the product goes, it is buyer beware. It sure does not look good to me.

And the marketing? That alone is reason enough for me not to support it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At least they're not trying to pass it off as actual absinthe, and they did what they should have done: they called it "absinthe flavored".

 

I don't think they went far enough, and imply to much that it some kind of absinthe lite.

and it is really the comment of "absinthe with a safety net" that got my goat up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know,none of this bothers me that much.I see nothing remotely misleading on the front label.(I haven't seen the back) But retailers have to display their products responibly.For example,a liquor store I frequent had Green Moon absinthe flavored vodka http://www.greenmoon...T&Submit=Submit mixed in with the real absinthe.I spoke to the owner,& he gladly moved it in with the vodkas. Keep this sambuca with the sambuca & I just don't see the problem.I think the label is totally honest in it's info & marketing.The label says "absinthe flavored" and from what I can see in the picture (correct me if I'm wrong) makes no mention of artificial vs. natural anything.Their labeling leads me to believe that the product they're selling is sambuca..a flavored sambuca.....no big whoop! As for any "predatory" aspects of their marketing,keep in mind that this is a UK release,and the drinking age there is 18 yrs old. If that's the age group they want to target,then that's their business,and I certainly don't feel it's any of mine to pass judgement on them for that... .......ok....come & get me!!! :devil:

Edited by redwun

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I find that this company is well respected, very clear that sambuca is made from star anise from china, infused and then distilled
Respected by whom, and for what? They would not be respected by any knowledgeable person with regard to their absinthe selection. Here is the review page at Fee Verte.

I'm not sure who we're talking about here anymore. Jo was referring to the sambuca maker, but that's a link to the Sebor page at FV, which has no connection to Antica except that they're both imported to the UK by Hi-Spirits. The sambuca distillery is in Italy and makes their distillates the same way most absinthe makers do (even if they are artificially colored).

 

I think maybe we're getting a bit soft after the relative decline of truly villainous Czech-sinthe pushers. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sambuca distillery is in Italy and makes their distillates the same way most absinthe makers do (even if they are artificially colored).

;)

 

Antica Sambuca is not artificially colored.

They are colored the same way Absinthe Verte's are.

Though I think the black is licorice boiled down before it's macerated/infused. If I remember correctly, it has to be boiled down to get that really dark black color, otherwise it will end up a blue/grey color.

 

Jo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can buy a genuine, non-bitter absinthe for ~$45 USD for 700 mL (Duplais Balance). There are many bottles that begin in the 50-60 dollar price range. Granted, that's not cheap for everyone, but when you consider a bottle of wine, a bottle of absinthe gives you way, way more glasses for the price.

 

Their Sambuca is not artificially colored because it's clear. You can't color something to make it clear. The same company makes Sebour Absinthe, a well known fauxsinthe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a point of clarification, different distilleries make Sebour and Antica Sambuca

 

The brands are connected. As Gwydion said.

 

I still question if all the product line is naturally colored.

 

They are colored the same way Absinthe Verte's are.

Though I think the black is licorice boiled down before it's macerated/infused. If I remember correctly, it has to be boiled down to get that really dark black color, otherwise it will end up a blue/grey color.

Jo

 

I looked again, I am not seeing any claim to natural colors. It looks fake, the same way La Fee is colored.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Antica Sambuca is not artificially colored.

They are colored the same way Absinthe Verte's are.

Joe,

 

Care to tell us how you know that as fact?

 

If the color represented in that picture is the same color as their actual product (instead of photoshopped for impression), I'll eat my hat if it's naturally colored.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The sambuca distillery is in Italy and makes their distillates the same way most absinthe makers do (even if they are artificially colored).

 

Antica Sambuca is not artificially colored. They are colored the same way Absinthe Verte's are.

Jo

I'm afraid you're incorrect; or at least partially so. Vertes are colored with an infusion of leafy herbal matter, whereas at least some of the Antica line are colored with synthetic dyes:

 

antica-cherry.jpeg antica-raspberry.jpeg

 

I guarantee that the bright blue color of the Mandarin is synthetic as well.

 

For those who are curious as to the artisanship of the distillery itself, you might want to check this out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the record, I don't think that there's anything "wrong" with artificially coloring products, as long as it's made clear on the label, but it does take them down a peg or two in the area of craftsmanship.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Their Sambuca is not artificially colored because it's clear. You can't color something to make it clear. The same company makes Sebour Absinthe, a well known fauxsinthe.

Their line of Antica Sambuca has colored varieties:

 

antica w_880.gif

 

Just a point of clarification, different distilleries make Sebour and Antica Sambuca

 

The brands are connected. As Gwydion said.

 

My point was that the brands are not connected; not any more so than any other two products that happen to be imported by the same company. Hi-Spirits may be the owner/developer of the Antica Sambuca brand (and maybe not), but that doesn't mean they own every brand they import and distribute, and it definitely doesn't mean they own the distilleries/wineries that produce them.

 

It's Sebor, by the way. No "u". ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I'm not saying this product doesn't have a right to exist, I'm just saying that it concerns me because it will probably only create more confusion with the actual category, and it does nothing to further the understanding of genuine absinthe.

 

Ding! Ding! Ding! We have a winner!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi-Spirits may be the owner/developer of the Antica Sambuca brand (and maybe not), but that doesn't mean they own every brand they import and distribute, and it definitely doesn't mean they own the distilleries/wineries that produce them.

 

That does deserve some clarification: So, after some further checking, I will correct myself.

The Chairman of Hi- Spirits is Jeremy Hill, The UK distributor and the company behind this maketing.

Hi-Spirits does not own the brand Antica Sambuca.

 

Jeremy Hill is the brand owner of Sebor http://webcache.goog...lient=firefox-a

 

 

I think that copy for Sebor speaks for itself, Have fun counting the bullshit statements!

 

 

I would venture to say, that the traditional version of Antica Sambuca is probably a fine product.( and I will leave it to the sambuca community to decide if the flavored class is desirable)

 

It is the marketing behavior of Hi-Spiritrs I find objectionable. Thus the UK consumer is welcome to question if that company is worthy of your sixpence.

Edited by TheLoucheyMonster!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×