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What brand(s) are closest to c. 1850's/1860's absinthe?

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Yeah, because velvety has nothing to do with aging for a century or so.

 

Drinking an 1850, or even 1914 absinthe, now is not what it would've been like within a year or few of it's production.

 

While we can't be absolutely sure without a time travel machine we can recreate recipes, procedures, and technology from the era.

 

An absinthe that has been bottle rested for a century is ridiculously expensive and not what someone of the time period would've been drinking.

 

Yeah, that's kind of what I was thinking. The best that can be done is to use period recipes and equipment. I'm still hoping for a time machine though. :devil:

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The stills used by most of the absinthe distillers are of the same type as pre ban equipment.

 

Some may be the same pots from that era. <shrug>

 

It's an old design and quite functional. I love the whole thing/process about making absinthe. I've watched too many youtube videos I reckon. :twitchsmile:

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Cool video. I like the hat! Didn't men take their hats off when indoors though? Just nitpicking, heheh.

 

 

Perhaps I should do the considerate thing and "forget" some absinthe bottles in the basement/attic. In 100 years, some lucky folks can taste a century-aged bottle. The mythical "free-ban".

 

Now if only my apartment had a basement or attic...or any storage space for that matter!

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Cool video. I like the hat! Didn't men take their hats off when indoors though? Just nitpicking, heheh.

 

 

Perhaps I should do the considerate thing and "forget" some absinthe bottles in the basement/attic. In 100 years, some lucky folks can taste a century-aged bottle. The mythical "free-ban".

 

Now if only my apartment had a basement or attic...or any storage space for that matter!

 

Thanks!

 

I'll volunteer my basement for your "forgotten" absinthe!

 

Yeah, I wore the hat for "effect" since I got into a hurry and didn't find a more appropriate place to sit in the house so there wasn't an air conditioner partly visible as well as sci-fi models perhaps visible in the cabinet behind me. I figured I needed a prop to help make up for the lack of authenticity.

 

In bars, I've seen evidence that hats were worn indoors though I haven't really researched that to death. I suspect in the lower class bars, at least, the custom was to wear hats during the 19th century. Does anyone out there happen to know?

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Ron, what was that Edouard preban and Jade Edouard that we did a side by side tasting?

 

My mind is mush but Ron will be able to help me.

 

Patience dear readers, he'll answer soon.

 

"Soon" is relative. Then again, my reference scale for time and distance is probably more extreme than most.

 

It was a c.1905 Edouard we compared with the 2006 Jade Edouard. Somewhere around here ago. Looks like the links are broken. I've got the pics here somewhere.

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"Soon" is relative

Yup, that's why I mentioned patience. ;)

 

That was a good long night. Yes, it sure was. There was some good booze tasted that night and early into the morning. :cheers:

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In bars, I've seen evidence that hats were worn indoors though I haven't really researched that to death. I suspect in the lower class bars, at least, the custom was to wear hats during the 19th century. Does anyone out there happen to know?

 

Basic hat etiquette link

 

I don't think the rules have changed much.

 

I think that if you were at a stand up bar, the best place to mind your hat would be on your head, unless the place had a hat or coat check.

 

Never set your hat down on a bar or table, that was (and is) gross and disgusting. Think how sweaty and smelly a hat would have been when people did not wash regularly.

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Add one more hat tidbit:

If you are carrying a holstered weapon, keep your hat on. :euro:

 

You might have more important things to do with your hands than hold a hat!

 

(for a military man or uniformed lawman, regs would require you to keep your 'cover' on indoors, being 'under arms'. If not under arms, you are usually required to take it off)

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Yeah, that's kind of what I was thinking. The best that can be done is to use period recipes and equipment. I'm still hoping for a time machine though. :devil:

 

 

so having an vintage stove make you a good cook ?

 

Succeeding in an macarons recipe by only having the ingredient too ?

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You might have more important things to do with your hands than hold a hat!

Maybe that's the source of the bad luck, but now that I think about it, maybe that was a bed (Drugstore Cowboy).

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Yeah, that's kind of what I was thinking. The best that can be done is to use period recipes and equipment. I'm still hoping for a time machine though. :devil:

 

so having an vintage stove make you a good cook ?

 

Succeeding in an macarons recipe by only having the ingredient too ?

True. If you're doing a reenactment thing, period recipes and equipment would be the way to go, but otherwise, it's not necessarily the best that can be done.

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Yeah, that's kind of what I was thinking. The best that can be done is to use period recipes and equipment. I'm still hoping for a time machine though. :devil:

 

 

so having an vintage stove make you a good cook ?

 

Succeeding in an macarons recipe by only having the ingredient too ?

 

 

No to both, but in following the period recipes, ingredients, and procedures (there's a lot more information out there than one might think on such obscure details), after some practice you should be able to turn out a reasonable facsimile of what our ancestors ate. Since food isn't typically stored for 150 years, that's all we have to go by. Even with items that are stored, the length of time can and will affect the taste. I'm resigned to those limitations but still dream about a time machine. :twitchsmile:

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Speaking of which. I need to go watch The Time Machine with Rod Taylor again. Did you know that the actor who played the Doctor's red haired friend, Filby, also voiced Scrooge McDuck? His name is Alan Young.

Edited by greytail

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the best place to mind your hat would be on your head,
Yep.
Never set your hat down on a bar or table,
Yep
gross and disgusting
Indeed.
Bad luck, too.
Or on a bed.
If you are carrying a holstered weapon, keep your hat on.
You better believe it.
Speaking of which. I need to go watch The Time Machine with Rod Taylor again.
Excellent

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Yeah, that's kind of what I was thinking. The best that can be done is to use period recipes and equipment. I'm still hoping for a time machine though. :devil:

 

 

so having an vintage stove make you a good cook ?

 

Succeeding in an macarons recipe by only having the ingredient too ?

Are you implying that modern absinthe makers with such knowledge and equipment are bad cooks? I'd trust them over the local vodka distiller any day. Especially since one of the local vodkas tastes like crappy tequila.

 

Or is it something else? Come on, out with it. No sense beating around the anachronistic bush, just say what you mean.

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Where did I see that they were bad cook I never say that . Most of sucessfull absinthe distiller their mother tongue is english and most only have basic french . All Original edition of distillers manual are in french , even in french (most manual are more than 100 years old) the subtillities in protocols if they hire translator could be translated in an different meaning that the author wants to mean .

 

 

I forgot another one in my 1860's alike :

 

I would add butterfly to my list ( I just forgot yesterday)

 

I would say in order :

 

Butterfly

edouard

Guy

Edited by EdouardPerneau

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I'm not sure I understand your point so I'm not bristling.

I can think of 5 excellent US absinthe distillers (No, I wouldn't dare add my name) with distinctly

different stills and techniques but each make high quality absinthe. The equipment is part of the equation, knowing how to use it is another and understanding what makes good absinthe is a third component. I'm not sure how an understanding of French or being able to dissect old recipes is really that vital.

 

I have had wonderful and not so wonderful absinthe from the US and Europe. Understanding French or old manuscripts does not seem to provide an advantage.

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Since french is my mother tongue ( I hope that y'all remember) I try to explain my point .

 

My point is not about quality ( I have some delaware Pheonix in my liquor cabinet At the time that I brough some it was the only decent absinthe at the cat skills )

 

Is about accuracy to be sticking the the protocols written in old manual dupais, roret,brevan they all got some part diffenrent.

 

Where I was going with my post it was that Ted Breaux, David Nathan, Peter schaf were the " father" of the rebirth of quality hand crafted absinthe . All are non french ( Since I don't know Ted personnaly is from lousianna he might know some french )

 

An secondary language is not always perfect ( as my english )

 

I hope that it clear my idea

 

Oh I forgot , Europeans friend aren't able to see It but I bet since canadians see it amercian might also see it :

 

roret 1862

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Ted speaks french alright.

If it is anything like my wife's french, it is very 'old'. They sound to modern french, like Benjamin Franklin would sound to us.

I don't think those manuals are the end all be all. They are good starting points, but practice, and being open to learning, is still essential. The advantage the dead PF men had was the 100 years of tricks of the trade passed from one generation to the next, so early 20th century PF men had all that experience to work with. Since those men died without passing on their experience, the new generation of distillers began almost at square one, except they know what the good stuff tastes like. The great grand kids of today's distillers are going to make some amazing CO stuff.

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Is about accuracy to be sticking the the protocols written in old manual dupais, roret,brevan they all got some part diffenrent.

 

Where I was going with my post it was that Ted Breaux, David Nathan, Peter schaf were the " father" of the rebirth of quality hand crafted absinthe . All are non french ( Since I don't know Ted personnaly is from lousianna he might know some french )

 

An secondary language is not always perfect ( as my english )

I hope that it clear my idea

That makes perfect sense. :cheers:

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I got way to far in absinthe Are you able to see the Roret book I put in the link? Recipe stays the same except they add creatan ditany everywhere

 

 

by combining all the books one could get an answer on every part of the process . This Manual is really complete they even says initial dillution

Edited by EdouardPerneau

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Are you implying that modern absinthe makers with such knowledge and equipment are bad cooks?

I sure didn't get that out of it. I thought he meant that vintage equipment and a list of ingredients wouldn't make one a good cook, and he couldn't be more right about that.

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Artemis got it exactly what I mean . In french we says : l'habit ne fait pas le moine

 

in english it could be : The clothes don't make the man

Edited by EdouardPerneau

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