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Garrett

Spoon safety

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I tried searching but wasn't able to find any information on this so hopefully I didn't just miss it... but I was wondering if all/most vintage spoons were safe to use. I imagine they are as I've been using mine for more than a year and I know the silver ones are, but I didn't know if lead was ever used in any and poisonous like some fountains. Thanks

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Most of them are fine, but you have to watch out for those glow-in-the-dark Radium Girl commemorative spoons. :poke:

 

Just kidding. I've never heard of lead used in spoons, just pot-metal, plated brass, aluminum, chromium, the usual suspects.

 

edit:

I always thought that lead was only or mostly dangerous to children.Is there a doctor in the house?

I think it's just that kid's are more likely to get lead poisoning because they're the ones chewing on woodwork covered with lead-based paint:

"Routes of exposure to lead include contaminated air, water, soil, food, and consumer products. Occupational exposure is a common cause of lead poisoning in adults. [...] One of the largest threats to children is lead paint that exists in many homes, especially older ones; thus children in older housing with chipping paint are at greater risk. [...] The Center for Disease Control has set the standard elevated blood lead level for adults to be 25 (µg/dl) of the whole blood. For children however, the number is set much lower at 10 (µg/dl) of blood and in 2012 there were recommendations to reduce this to 5 (µg/dl).[3] Children are especially prone to the health effects of lead and as a result, blood lead levels must be set lower and closely monitored if contamination is possible."

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I don't know,I've been drinking water through copper plumbing for 50 yrs.Blood work is still normal.

Edited by redwun

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The only thing with brass spoons is that they can blemish if you don't take care of them. Like I didn't after my four glass review experiment.

I'm glad I have a cheap stainless one now. And now they all sit as perfect decorations, since all my collection is better sans sucre.

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:shock:

 

Didn't know she liked it with lime and ginger beer, although I assumed the vodka element must have been present. :laugh:

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I tried searching but wasn't able to find any information on this so hopefully I didn't just miss it... but I was wondering if all/most vintage spoons were safe to use. I imagine they are as I've been using mine for more than a year and I know the silver ones are, but I didn't know if lead was ever used in any and poisonous like some fountains. Thanks

As was stated earlier, it doesn't appear lead was ever used in the production of absinthe spoons (although I'll add "pewter" to the list of metals they were made from, as I have at least one pewter spoon); however, if you really want to play it safe, you could use a lead-testing kit on your spoons to be sure. They're usually available from local hardware stored. as well as online.

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I was sure I had answered this thread, but then apparently no.

 

I cannot recall having seen lead used in ancient spoon, nor can I recall having read it in Marie Claude Delahaye's book.

 

Most antique spoons are either plated brass or maillechort (maillechort being copper, zinc and nickel).

Most of the time, the plating will be silver or nickel (chrome for the latest), and many spoons still have a perfect plating (vitraux and tour eiffel 3/4/5 are notable exceptions to that rule)

 

Aluminium, sterling silver, whole maillechort, tin, full nickel can also be found, while rare for silver and aluminium.

 

The only spoons I would not recommend either way are poilu spoons, made with whatever metal they had in the trenches. But then, I seriously doubt you would buy one (because they are exceptionnaly rare, almost unique, because they have poor usability, and because of the reason I just explained).

 

My advice ? You would be perfectly safe with a silversmith hallmarked spoon, such as a Christofle, Gombaut, or Cailar Bayar, some of which are even quite accessible price wise on Marc's website

 

But anytime you have a doubt, post a picture in the spoons thread, I will try to answer to the best of my (or Marie Claude Delahaye's) knowledge

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I always wondered about those uranium glass carafes. I think they look bad ass, but I'm pretty sure actually using them for water would be a bad idea. I could never find a definitive answer online.

 

Also, I've never heard of lead spoons either. I could certainly imagine some of the metals they used back then in the dirt cheap spoons could be unhealthy, but I have no idea. I figure it'd be similar to the dirt cheap knock off absinthes of the period that had nasty toxic metals in them.

Edited by optional

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There have been a few folks here that have done testing on lead and almost any ugliness there is to be found. Uranium glass is one. Lead in old fountains. Types of corks. You name it and it's been tested for.

 

There are some pretty bright and careful members here.

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To answer the question on Ouraline (Uranimum glass) you can check this document : NUREG 1717

Systematic Radiological Assessment of Exemptions for Source and Byproduct Materials.

 

Namely 3.13 and 3.13.4.3.1 in particular . To sum up : the American government says it's okay

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the American government says it's okay

They are here to help us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

:puke:

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Indeed! They are the reason (Tinker AFB to be exact) that my water supply has more chromium than anywhere else in the US. Don't worry people who come over, I only use filtered water in my absinthe drips.) ;)

Edited by brewmaster

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