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meatbag21

Pernod Absinthe Supérieure

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@fingerpickinblue - This is a definitive examination and fairly damning to Pernod. Truly too bad they cannot seem to authentically commit to their own history.

 

@Brian Robinson - I believe I recall seeing this before. Thanks for the memory-jog. Sounds very "meh".

Edited by JosephLabrecque

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So at first I said to myself "This does not fit the 1896 brochure which has no reference to nettles or star anise." So that means they have made a mistake (or two) in 2013.

 

Then I thought "Well maybe the 1896 brochure is wrong, and the Pernod 1896 team deliberately left out references to nettles and star anise then."

 

Then I re-read everything and saw another scenario in which both the 1896 brochure and the 2013 marketing are correct.

 

Who, apart from Pernod, has access to the original recipe from 1805? Who of us have ever tasted an 1805 Pernod?

 

Maybe the Original Formula (capitals obligatory it seems) is just that, and in the years between 1805 and 1896 the nettle/star anise were removed?

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It's a real stretch, but it's something to consider. The trouble is you just made me reread the release again and I found even more errors and misinformation having to do with chronology. At any rate, statements such as "dating back to 1800s" and "how Pernod Absinthe was made in the 1800s" certainly don't seem definitive that they are talking literally about the "original (first) formula". You'd think something like that would behoove them to be specific in their representations, since that would be huge in terms of what we know about Pernod's and absinthe's history. And as a selling point/marketing tool it would be powerful and just about unassailable.

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Whatever it turns out to be its clear the drink doesn't much resemble the Pernod Fils we know. Im sure the "Original Recipe" thing is more a marketing thing, though Alan may well be onto something and the 1805 recipe may have differed from the 1890s recipe. But I think its more likely its nothing more than "inspired" by the original recipe and there was probably internal pressure from within the company to keep some star anise, since thats the flavour Pernod is now famous for - I cant even imagine what the internal politics are like in a place like pernod ricard.

 

Still, even if the label is a bit of false advertising and even if its not a particularly special drink. Its still a step in the right direction. Anyway, we've already got the Jade PF01 so we don't really need an authentic new Pernod Fils all that much

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Its perplexing that in a market where a lot of distillers are looking to do it right, pernod seems to go in the opposite direction.

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Still, even if the label is a bit of false advertising and even if its not a particularly special drink. Its still a step in the right direction.

 

I'm not arguing that. I'm more arguing the whole way the thing is being couched. Seems our friend, Mr. J.Y. Dog feels similarly. Some more of my comments can be found there.

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I'm simply not happy that this big company ignored its heritage and Pontarlier, until it was profitable, then bought up most of the Pontarlier wormwood, to the point where an artisanal distiller who's a friend of ours can't get it for a batch they needed to make. I caught wind of this when I was in Pontarlier last week. I hope the growers will be careful about who they sell to, and not hand Pernod control of their crops every year.

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"Next read that bit about coloration again. Nettles? Coloring with nettles is not an authentic thing from any of the historic distilling manuals I’ve had access to, and is not an ingredient mentioned in thePernod Fils 1896 catalogue description and defense of absinthe."

 

Hey Evan, It's actually frequently referred to.

 

For example, Roret (probably one of the most common books to find) mentions it in the section on colors for liqueurs. Look under what's usually Section 4. Coleurs Vertes.

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Hairs need only receive a quick blanch in boiling water (or heating in coloration or tranchage) and they're disarmed. They're easy to include and don't taste half-bad in soup, stew and in cheese-stuffed pasta.

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Has no one had a sample of the "original recipe" yet?

Yep. Had it back in July. A friend and I got to sit down with the Reps to try it.

 

 

 

From my Facebook post about it:

 

It's very wormwood forward; tannic almost. Not the disturbingly bitter dryness of macerated wormwood, but more of a tannic dryness. Star anise is dramatically reduced. In fact, anise as a whole has been dialed down a lot. The wine base isn't very prominent. No tongue numbing like previous versions.

 

It doesn't taste like any pre-ban Pernod I've had.

 

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

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So at first I said to myself "This does not fit the 1896 brochure which has no reference to nettles or star anise." So that means they have made a mistake (or two) in 2013.

 

Then I thought "Well maybe the 1896 brochure is wrong, and the Pernod 1896 team deliberately left out references to nettles and star anise then."

 

Then I re-read everything and saw another scenario in which both the 1896 brochure and the 2013 marketing are correct.

 

Who, apart from Pernod, has access to the original recipe from 1805? Who of us have ever tasted an 1805 Pernod?

 

Maybe the Original Formula (capitals obligatory it seems) is just that, and in the years between 1805 and 1896 the nettle/star anise were removed?

It's a far stretch and an assumption, just because it's a possibility doesn't mean it actually was. This boils down to "prove it". I can't just accept Pernod Ricard's word on absinthe anymore.

 

"Next read that bit about coloration again. Nettles? Coloring with nettles is not an authentic thing from any of the historic distilling manuals I’ve had access to, and is not an ingredient mentioned in thePernod Fils 1896 catalogue description and defense of absinthe."

 

Hey Evan, It's actually frequently referred to.

 

For example, Roret (probably one of the most common books to find) mentions it in the section on colors for liqueurs. Look under what's usually Section 4. Coleurs Vertes.

Hey Grim, my copy of Roret doesn't mention it in coloration

.

Frequently means more than once at least, any other manuals? Any that pertain to Pernod using it?

 

I'm sure it was used (because I DO trust your word about such things), just not sure about the frequency, and definitely not sure about Pernod Fils using it.

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Well this really amuses me. Honestly, I hadn't paid attention to it when I wrote this the other day:

 

It's just the continuing gall to take a few baby steps and then make it sound like they're the second coming of Pernod Fils (replete with "here we come to save the day")... well, it's about enough to make my head explode.

 

This is post #19 from the thread I linked in post #120 in this thread:

 

Most likely it'll be a mid level absinthe, that will get a huge media push. P.R. probably could care less about absinthe forums, they'll make a big push though other cocktail sources, as this being the second coming.

Just watch...

 

Good call Imp.

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I don't know anything about nettles or star anise, but some may find it interesting that Pernod Fils in both 1883 and 1884 bought (literally) tons of
green anise from Tarn (as described in the 1896 Pernod Fils catalogue).

 

GreenAnise.jpg

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I'm pretty sure I've also seen nettles used for coloration in some old text, as well as spinach. Don't ask me names or dates though, I'm not a very good historian.

What I know is that they don't impart any desireable flavor, so if used alone it's not much different than using food coloring. A good authentic coloration doesn't just add color, but also a good deal of flavors.

 

Not having tasted the new Pernod I obviously can't comment on it, but I wouldn't be surprised if what they've done is distilling a blanche and then adding some nettle concentrate for color. Kind of like trying to make an absinthe authentic, in the cheapest way possible.

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I don't know anything about nettles or star anise, but some may find it interesting that Pernod Fils in both 1883 and 1884 bought (literally) tons of

green anise from Tarn (as described in the 1896 Pernod Fils catalogue).

Green anise (aniseed) =/= star anise ;)

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Maybe Pernod absinthe ordinaire that they have ? Or the reporter just took what was on pernod absinthe website before they shut it down ? future'll tell us Well french version of press release is even badder http://www.luxsure.fr/2013/10/11/renaissance-fee-verte-pernod/

 

 

 

Dans les alambics en cuivre de la nouvelle distillerie de Thuir, la grande absinthe de Pontarlier et l’anis vert sont distillés après macération dans l’alcool vinique. Le coeur du distillat de grande qualité est ensuite macéré à nouveau en présence d’un bouquet aromatique riche de badiane, mélisse, petite absinthe d’hysope, et d’ortie qui lui donne sa belle couleur.

 

 

In the cooper alambic of Thuir , The wormwood from pontarlier and the green anise are distilled after an macération in wine alcohol , The heart of the high quality distillate is macerated again with an aromatic bouquet of Star anise , melissa, roman wormwood ,hyssop and neddles that gives it it's green color

Edited by EdouardPerneau

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Maybe Pernod absinthe ordinaire that they have ? Or the reporter just took what was on pernod absinthe website before they shut it down ?

 

The website is back up. And it's new.

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Website here. What appears to be the "official" press release here.

 

All I can say is WOW!... just WOW! You all know I can be a little long winded, but this one really takes the cake. It's like 5 pounds of thought in a 50 pound bag. I'm not even going to consider taking the lead this time with what's wrong or in conflict with other things said, especially in comparison to the last press release we were discussing. I'll let someone else do it if there is interest. Instead for those equally befuddled as I was the first time through, please let me provide the following translation/"Cliffs Notes" of what is actually being said.

 

 

PERNOD, THE CREATOR OF ABSINTHE,

RECREATES ITS HENRI LOUIS PERNOD DISTILLERY

WHEN IT COMES TO ABSINTHE, WE ARE GOD

AND ON THE SEVENTH DAY WE CREATED AN OLD DISTILLERY

 

After two years of meticulous work Pernod Absinthe, the original creator of absinthe, is proud to unveil its new distillery in the historic Maison Pernod in Thuir. This faithful recreation of the original distillery will allow Pernod to generate the taste and flavor of the traditional absinthe recipe from the 19th century, which was the muse and inspiration for the greatest artists of the “Belle Epoque” including Van Gogh, Toulouse Lautrec and Picasso, as well as writers and bartenders alike.

Check out our new distillery. Two years to build this place. It's pretty awesome and now we can make absinthe that tastes just like the old stuff. And speaking of old, in the old days it was enjoyed by some pretty cool dudes.

 

The first commercial absinthe distillery “La Maison Pernod Fils”, was founded in 1805 by the young Henri-Louis Pernod at Pontarlier in France and lovers of this superior spirit which is anchored in tradition have long been calling for a revival of its truest form. Today, Pernod is proud to be at the vanguard of the absinthe renaissance due to its unique production methods which have been authentically retained through the traditional craft process at the recreated Henri Louis Pernod distillery in Thuir.

The first absinthe distillery got going in 1805, and for a long time now people have been wanting to taste the real thing again. Well, ta dahh!... We can make the old school stuff 'cause we've got this old looking place to do it.

 

Pernod Absinthe is a high proof spirit like no other, distilled from the essential DNA of anise and Wormwood from the region of Pontarlier. It brings a mysterious and bold aura that is truly unmistakable and the authentic Pernod distillery formulation both honors and celebrates this often misunderstood spirit.

Our absinthe is really different. It's complicated as a crime scene, and it's that way because we cracked the code and cut through the crap the other guys couldn't. I think all those old Pernods would be proud.

 

By using traditional methods and combining wine based distillates and macerates of real herbs and botanicals, Pernod is leading the ultimate revival of absinthe by showing its respect for the original manufacturing process. The combination of the specifically chosen aromatic plants, the ancestry know-how of Pernod in terms of aromatic equilibrium and the mastery of traditional extraction processes reveal the true delicacy of wormwood and bring a subtlety and complexity to the final product.

It's simple. All you gotta do is show a little respect. Well, and do it the old way, using really good herbs and alcohol and stuff. Being a Pernod doesn't hurt either. Some people are just born naturals.

 

Mathieu Sabbagh, International Director of Pernod says “The establishment of the new distillery in Thuir is a testament to our commitment to the long term growth of the brand and the category. The production process in the distillery has been replicated to ensure that every stage of the apothecary like technique is completed in the traditional way.”

One of our big shots thinks this should quiet down everyone who ever thought we weren't really into this. And we figured out how to do it just like the old days. It's like ridin' a bike or makin' medicine.

 

Pernod Absinthe offers consumers who are new to this spirit, the heady experience of trying something undiscovered while reconnecting with the past. And those who already know and love absinthe can now savour the most authentic version available.

If you've never tried absinthe, this'll blow your mind... just like time travel. If you have, this one'll be better because it's just made right.

 

With this reincarnation of the original distillery Pernod Absinthe is set to once again become a social phenomenon enhanced by the mesmerizing traditional ritual that accompanies its consumption: icy water trickled drop by drop onto a sugar cube placed on an absinthe spoon, dissolving it and clouding the emerald spirit languishing in the bottom of the glass.

What really counts, though, is that we're about to get this party started. It's not just a drink. It's a statement... better than TV! Drip, drip, drip as the sugar melts and the green turns to clouds, and no commercials!

 

Combining the talents of key bartenders such as Eric Fossard and Charles Vexenat with the expertise of the Pernod Lab, Pernod have integrated a lab and bartender academy to allow bartenders to experiment with Pernod Absinthe in more contemporary ways and showcase refreshing cocktails, like the Pernod Green Beast. This cocktail which combines Pernod Absinthe with a green medley of fresh lime, cucumber and sugar syrup was created by Charles Vexenat, a French barman who loves Pernod Absinthe and has been voted the world’s best mixer twice.

If that gets boring to you, we've got these two dudes that make some killer drinks, too. It helps that we have something almost like a chemistry lab and school for them to go to. Even though one of them won some big deal contest a couple of times, he's even better now that he works for us and he made up one of the best drinks.

 

Absinthe has been traditionally used in cocktails since the 19th Century. Back when Harry Johnson and Jerry Thomas were not the only bartenders to hold court behind the mahogany during the mid- to late-1800s, every discerning barman would have a bottle of Pernod Absinthe on their back bar to concoct classic cocktails such as the Blackthorn, Absinthe Frappe, Absinthe Sazeracs, the Chrysanthemum and the ominously sounding Death in the Afternoon. From the Mixicologist, CF Lawlor, 1895, Lawlor notes that “to some tastes, a cocktail is much improved by the addition of two or three drops of Absinthe”.

Other guys have made some drinks with absinthe a long time ago. Jerry Thomas and Harry Johnson (Harry Johnson! Heh, heh... you can't make that name up!). Anyway, these guys and a bunch of other guys all had Pernod and made a lot of drinks with absinthe. I guess a little dab'll do ya.

 

Mathieu continues “We are incredibly excited to open our new distillery and we look forward to seeing bartenders create some inspirational cocktails and innovative potions that will deliver an exciting and seductive taste experience for our consumers.”

So anyway, we're really pumped about this new place and we can't wait to see the new drinks some other new guys will come up with.

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(And everyone knows what God spelled backwards is) WHEN IT COMES TO ABSINTHE, WE ARE GOD

AND ON THE SEVENTH DAY WE CREATED AN OLD DISTILLERY

Buncha hoss :poop:

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