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need input: beverages that have disappeared / resurfaced

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I'm doing some research for an upcoming article and am looking for some suggestions. The article will be about beverages that have disappeared all together and beverages that have disappeared and (somewhat) recently be revived, even if just in the US.

 

An example for something that has gone away and come back would be absinthe and creme de violette.

 

An (bad) example of something that has gone away and (thankfully) not returned would be Zima.

 

It can be any type of beverage, alcoholic and non alcoholic.

 

Any suggestions? :)

 

:pirate:

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Gone:

Quinine Whiskey

Pepsi Ice (bad)

Burples (nostalgic)

Goze beers (not gone, but increasingly more rare)

 

 

 

Back:

Creme Yvette

Swedish Punsch

Maryland Style Rye

Gum Syrup

 

 

Not sure:

Pisang Ambon - might not have gone away, but I don't believe it's available in the States anymore. Artificially colored as all get out, but tasty.

 

 

I've got a bunch more but I can't think of them off of the top of my head right now. Will do some thinking.

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OK Soda. Maybe file under Bad and thankfully not returning.

 

I heard Pisco was more popular before prohibition and it seems to be making a comeback now.

 

Mescal and other relatives of Tequila?

 

Moonshine (maybe).

 

Dogfishhead has a line of ancient ales they are resurrecting.

 

Otherwise I'm at a loss.

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Lemon Hart 151

Rye (not really totally gone, but it's made a huge comeback in recent years)

real Sloe Gin

Parfait Amour

Gran Classico (Bitter of Turin revival)

Maurin Quina

many brands of bitters and the use of bitters in general

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Falernum and Pimento Dram are recently revived Good Things™.

Yea! Those two were on my list, so that's good.

 

 

Gone:

Quinine Whiskey

Pepsi Ice (bad)

Burples (nostalgic)

Goze beers (not gone, but increasingly more rare)

 

 

 

Back:

Creme Yvette

Swedish Punsch

Maryland Style Rye

Gum Syrup

 

 

Not sure:

Pisang Ambon - might not have gone away, but I don't believe it's available in the States anymore. Artificially colored as all get out, but tasty.

 

 

I've got a bunch more but I can't think of them off of the top of my head right now. Will do some thinking.

 

 

Pepsi Ice / Crystal Pepsi was definitely on my list haha. I'll look into the rest, thanks for the help!

 

Judy, Rye is a good one. Agreed that it never really left, but the surge (oh, another beverage of yesteryear!) as of late .. same with tequila and mescal.

 

 

Evan, nice tie in with Dogfish Head!!

 

And everyone else, thanks for the suggestions. These will definitely help and help me find new things I'm sure.

 

:pirate:

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An (bad) example of something that has gone away and (thankfully) not returned would be Zima.

 

Man, does Zima bring back memories, though! When that first came out, I had just gotten together with my wife. I remember it being refreshingly unique at the time, and drinking large quantities that summer...

 

What about the "dry" beer style? I seem to remember a Molson Dry, among others...

 

:cheerz:

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Back:

Mountain Dew Throwback

Pepsi Throwback

Heritage Dr. Pepper

 

Gone:

Surge

Ecto Cooler Kool-Aid

Four Loko

Cocaine (energy drink)

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I've been working through a 13th Century Andalucian cookbook for a while, and they have a bunch of really interesting foods and drinks. I recently found an online translation of it as well.

 

Here are a few gems:

 

Sekanjabin - a type of sweet vinegar drink. Similar to a Shrub based drink.

 

Clarea of Water - basically a spiced honey water which used to be served with meals.

 

Spiced Pomegranate Drink - similar to the Clarea, but using pomegranates as well.

 

I can provide more information if needed.

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Mello Joy Coffee, the coffee that was very popular among cajuns eons ago. (recent rebirth of the name)

 

Jax Beer. The Pope and the Imp might know if it was any good. Gone, replaced with several tourist traps.

 

The Barq's creme sodas. Not gone, but I only saw them in Berwick, LA.

Edited by Miguel

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Jackson Brewing went out of business, but I think they sold the formula for Jax beer to Pearl (Texas).

I don't remember anything special about it; it was probably on a par with other regional "American Pilseners", such as Falstaff, Pearl, etc. which means, at least to me, made with corn adjuncts, light-colored, tart. The building is a shopping mall, but there is (or was, I don't know) a decent brewpub close by.

 

Someone had a red creme soda called "Pop Rouge" at one time, maybe that was Barqs.

 

The thing I miss is Creole Cream Cheese. There were only two, and now one is gone, due to an explosion at the dairy last year.

 

Mello Joy commercials give the impression they were here all along, but I don't remember seeing it until recently - if it was gone and brought back, I guess that would explain that.

 

For a feel good return story, it's hard to top Herbsaint. I've tried to talk Jay into working on the return of Picayune cigarettes, the very definition of a coffin nail.

 

Another NOLA drink that's gone is Dr. Nut, an almond-flavored soda pop. Most people never heard of it unless they've read Confederacy of Dunces, but I remember the bottle with the squirrel on it - very quirky product, just the thing for Ignatius J. Reilly.

Edited by Artemis

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Jackson Brewing went out of business, but I think they sold the formula for Jax beer to Pearl (Texas).

I don't remember anything special about it

 

Actually, Jax was aged in cypress wood tanks, which was unique among American beers (as far as I'm aware), and while that quality was not easy to discern as the wood aging of, say, Ballantine IPA and Burton Ale, it was noticeable enough, and I found it quite pleasant.

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Anything Tempus Fugit does is pretty much a 'gone and back'.

 

Shrubb.

 

Quinquinas.

 

Amaros- most are comebacks.

 

Velvet and regular Falarnum.

 

Lemon Hart 80 and 151, but only disappearing mere (but terrible) months- (Thank you, Ed).

 

Resin ales- gone for a while now.

 

I'm sure I'll think of more. Brain is in work mode right now too much. I need a cocktail to do this properly.

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Oh! And one that disappeared that I still miss/have fond memories of- Josta soda.

 

 

http://www.savejosta.com/

 

I still thyink it was 10 years ahead of its time, being, to my knowledge, the first energy soda- sorta. They basically jazzed up a Dr. Pepper/Rock-n-Rye soda with the highly exotic (for 1996) herb guarana.

 

I thought it tasted great.

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Jackson Brewing went out of business, but I think they sold the formula for Jax beer to Pearl (Texas).

I don't remember anything special about it

 

Actually, Jax was aged in cypress wood tanks, which was unique among American beers (as far as I'm aware), and while that quality was not easy to discern as the wood aging of, say, Ballantine IPA and Burton Ale, it was noticeable enough, and I found it quite pleasant.

 

No, Dixie was aged in cypress. The beer still exists, but the brewery was damaged by Hurricane Katrina and whatever wasn't destroyed was looted; I don't know if the cypress vessels survived. The woody taste was actually quite intense, definitely an acquired taste. Whether that was from the cypress I can't say because I seem to remember reading that the vats were lined on the interior, but it was actually fermented in wooden vessels as well. I drank Dixie in my youth, not because I liked it (sort of like licking out a pirogue), but because it had a sort of rebel cache (not in the Confederate sense).

Edited by Artemis

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Damn, Artie, you're right, I always confuse those two. It's been at least thirty years since I've sampled either. As for the intensity of the woody flavor, perhaps my playing it down is a retrospective function of the myriad barrel aged beers I've tried over the last decade, or so, the woody aspect of which has been far more intense. In any event, thanks for the much needed memory jostle. :cheers:

Edited by Absomphe

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Well it's been a lot of years, but I mean it was intense compared to other beers available to me at the time (Bud, Schlitz, Miller, Pearl, etc.) It probably can't compare to the weirdness of some of the stuff you and Jack Batemaster favor. It seemed to be the favored beer of a biker gang that used to gather at a local bar, which impressed me and my friends somehow. It came in a can that was slightly bigger than those of the other brands, and it was a heavy duty can that defied crushing it with one hand (a rite of passage) and probably made it more useful as a weapon in a melee.

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By the time I tried it (in Houston) in '81, Dixie was more readily available in bottles (obviously a more effective weapon than any gauge of can metal :) ), but it definitely did seem to attract the bikers who lived in my apartment complex. I'll never forget the day they noticed me drinking the deceptively strong (8.2% abv) Belgian ale Duvel, and ragged on me for not drinking a more manly brew. At which point, I cracked open the remnants of my six pack, and invited three of them to join me. After they had drained the contents of their bottles, each one felt compelled to dive off the roof of the utility shed into the swimming pool. Lester was the last one to dive, and he, er, um, well...missed, and broke his leg.

 

After that, those guys never denigrated the manliness of my beer choices, and we even became pretty good buddies. Life's funny like that, sometimes.

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No, Dixie was aged in cypress. The beer still exists, but the brewery was damaged by Hurricane Katrina and whatever wasn't destroyed was looted; I don't know if the cypress vessels survived. The woody taste was actually quite intense, definitely an acquired taste. Whether that was from the cypress I can't say because I seem to remember reading that the vats were lined on the interior, but it was actually fermented in wooden vessels as well.

 

Wooden mash tuns would lose their wood flavor after a few uses.... hot water and all. Most wooden kegs and tones from back in the day were lined with pitch ( essentially wax) to avoid flavor pick up and to minimize bacterial contamination. There are aways exceptions.

Edited by leopold

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