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greytail

How do you gauge your "sweet spot"?

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Please feel free to call me whatever you like. :wave2: And I'm with you--I've got two spare bottles in the absinthe closet. I may get them some friends soon.

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an over-watered absinthe is still a pretty nice drink.

I suppose it is. I think bauble likes his absinthe at least 8:1 and then adds water as desired. He's a right smart fellow and a pretty fair hand with fountains.

 

I usually use a cup I made so each one takes a bit of eyeballing and getting used to the first few times. Usually like Joe said, if it's an absinthe I know I just let the dripper/fountain/water bottle do the work and relax or send a few text messages to other forum members. Sometimes an 8:1 glass happens when I get distracted.

 

 

His drinks last longer than mine. ;)

 

Thimbles never last as long as regular glasses. :pirate:

 

Besides, I've got a smaller mouth so it just takes longer sometimes. <---Don't you dare touch that one Clowny!

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4-to-1 is usually my choice, .....

 

All it has really been good for is to let me know it is still under-watered but getting close: Time to pay attention...

 

Agreed and agreed. I've never liked it at the TAB point, to me it is just when I begin to taste it. I'm guessing Ted likes his booze on the strong side. To be honest, since my fountain died, I just shoot for a rough 4:1 and adjust as needed. I agree that alcohol heat will hide some of the more delicate flavors. With some absinthes, it is cool to try different ratios, as one can learn to adjust ratios for one's mood.

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He's befouled the youth already. All hope is lost. We're doomed.

 

He called me a youth! :laugh:

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Hey guys. For the last month or two, I've begun to notice I like my absinthe with a bit more water. A year ago, 3:1

worked for about half of what I drank, and 4:1 was as high as I'd go, but only the ABVs around 45 work at 3:1 for me these days. 4-5 parts water is where I'm living most of the time...every so often, even a bit more if the ABV is higher... Blanche Trad, for instance.

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Hello Scott, nice to meet you. Now if you care to run to the intro section and tell us some about you... ;)

 

Funny I've gone the other way with final ABV, but I do like to have as little heat as possible.

Edited by Miguel

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Besides, I've got a smaller mouth so it just takes longer sometimes. <---Don't you dare touch that one Clowny!

 

Rest assured, BAUB, I have absolutely no desire to come...go...approach anywhere near your petite oral cavity. :laugh:

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Thanks, Doc (sorry for being presumptuous but I see they call you Doc)

She's a doctor of sex. I mean moms. I mean psychology.

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Thanks, Doc (sorry for being presumptuous but I see they call you Doc)

She's a doctor of sex. I mean moms. I mean psychology.

 

It all seems to run together after a while, doesn't it.

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Time to pay attention

 

The disappearance of the hydrophopic layer is precisely that. If you drink it at that point (depending upon the alcoholic content of the absinthe at hand of course), it's going to be a drink that is hot. Some people like it that way. The optimal amount of water after that point for any given absinthe (again, it varies) will only be determined by the individual through trial and error. I think Ted's point went to the fact that under-watering is correctable. Over-watering is not.

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Could one not simply add a bit more absinthe if one over-watered? I mix cement frequently enough to know that one can add either more water or more mortar mix to compensate for over or under saturating the mix.

 

When I used to mix gin/tonics I'd sometimes get my ratio off and have to add more of either the tonic or gin, but it could be fixed.

 

The point is that under watering and tasting and then adding water from there is the ideal though.

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In my short experience, I have successfully added absinthe if I power louched, and the particular absinthe is power-louchable. For example, Ridge Verte.

But if one has carefully dripped louched a thinner louching absinthe into a nice milky louche (Sauvage or Marteau for example), but one then over watered, adding more of the thinner louching absinthe will never return one to that perfect louche one stupidly over watered.

Edited by Miguel

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in theory yes, but in practice, once you've blown it, you've blown it. Don't know the whys and wherefores, just speaking from practical experience.

 

Right. Of course it can be changed by adding more absinthe, but it's harder to get an an ideal balance that way. There are reasons water is added to absinthe, and not absinthe to water.

 

The cement analogy is a good one.

 

I don't think it is. See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrophobic_effect

 

The only thing that dictates the louche (given the mixtures of oils) is the ratio of water to ethanol, and is completely reversible.

 

If that were so, the temperature of the water and the speed of the drip would not affect the louche, but they do. It is somewhat reversible depending upon the absinthe. You can rescue a drink sufficiently to make you prefer to drink it rather than sink it by adding more absinthe, but it's not an ideal drink.

Edited by Artemis

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in theory yes, but in practice, once you've blown it, you've blown it. Don't know the whys and wherefores, just speaking from practical experience.

 

Right. Of course it can be changed by adding more absinthe, but it's harder to get an an ideal balance that way. There are reasons water is added to absinthe, and not absinthe to water.

Agreed. I've never been able to get the spike brouilleur to work as well as a traditional model.

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Could one not simply add a bit more absinthe if one over-watered?

 

Yes. Please allow me to rephrase:

 

I think Ted's point went to the fact that under-watering is always easily correctable. Over-watering may not be.

 

Personally, I almost always "power louche", I can almost always tell when absinthe is watered to my preference just by looking at it (the smell helps, too), and my method of correction for over-watering is to drink it anyway and try to be more careful with the next glass. It's not rocket surgery.

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I've never been able to get an absinthe to taste good when I have to add more absinthe...generally because it's really hard to put less than a splash into the glass, which then needs more water, etc. If I were able to use a dropper to put in 4 or 5 drops of absinthe, it might be more realistic.

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Exactly. You could play that water/absinthe thing all night, and besides, when it's over-watered, the glass is probably already full or close to it anyway - no place to put more than a few drops of anything. A dropper is a good thing to have, though. It's good when all you have is a tiny sample, especially of some rare absinthe, and the drops of both absinthe and water can be easily counted into the glass if you're interested in a definite ratio.

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I wouldn't. Have only done so as an option to sinking a 1/2 liter glass. It worked, but I'll be happy if I never have to try it again. The beauty of a dripper is that once you get the hang of it, it is nearly impossible to over water.

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Time to pay attention

 

The disappearance of the hydrophopic layer is precisely that... I think Ted's point went to the fact that under-watering is correctable. Over-watering is not.

 

Could one not simply add a bit more absinthe if one over-watered?.. When I used to mix gin/tonics I'd sometimes get my ratio off and have to add more of either the tonic or gin, but it could be fixed... The point is that under watering and tasting and then adding water from there is the ideal though.

 

in theory yes, but in practice, once you've blown it, you've blown it. Don't know the whys and wherefores, just speaking from practical experience.

 

But if one has carefully dripped louched a thinner louching absinthe into a nice milky louche (Sauvage or Marteau for example), but one then over watered, adding more of the thinner louching absinthe will never return one to that perfect louche one stupidly over watered.

 

Right. Of course it can be changed by adding more absinthe, but it's harder to get an an ideal balance that way. There are reasons water is added to absinthe, and not absinthe to water.

 

The only thing that dictates the louche (given the mixtures of oils) is the ratio of water to ethanol, and is completely reversible.

 

If that were so, the temperature of the water and the speed of the drip would not affect the louche, but they do. It is somewhat reversible depending upon the absinthe. You can rescue a drink sufficiently to make you prefer to drink it rather than sink it by adding more absinthe, but it's not an ideal drink.

 

Agreed. I've never been able to get the spike brouilleur to work as well as a traditional model.

 

I've never been able to get an absinthe to taste good when I have to add more absinthe...generally because it's really hard to put less than a splash into the glass, which then needs more water, etc. If I were able to use a dropper to put in 4 or 5 drops of absinthe, it might be more realistic.

 

You just didn't over-water enough. ;)

 

I wouldn't. Have only done so as an option to sinking a 1/2 liter glass. It worked, but I'll be happy if I never have to try it again. The beauty of a dripper is that once you get the hang of it, it is nearly impossible to over water.

 

And I'm just waiting to hear the explanation of this.

 

Could one not simply add a bit more absinthe if one over-watered?

 

Yes. Please allow me to rephrase:

 

I think Ted's point went to the fact that under-watering is always easily correctable. Over-watering may not be.

 

Yep.

 

 

 

Where's my man, Joe L. when I need him. I know he likes experiments. I'd love to do a blind tasting where the taster(s) stated their preferred ratio with specific absinthes, and were then presented with 1 glass dripped at a "slow" rate, and another glass dripped at the same rate, but with 75% of the dose of the first glass to start and the same quantity of water, and the final 25% of the dose added after the drip. Then they have to identify which is which. I want to shake the hand of the man or woman who thinks they could pull this off with any consistency. I'm not thinking I'd take that bet as a taster.

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