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Valkyria Absinthe

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I saw this update on Hartsmar's site, http://absinthe.se/

 

11/01/2011

The first Swedish absinthe distillery in modern times is a fact. Sankta Annas Br�nneri in Lindesberg distills traditional absinthe and soon their brand Valkyria is launched. I wish them good luck and look forward to tasting it

 

LINK to Distiller's facebook, in Swedish

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Their facebook page checks out via google translate.

 

Swedish-absinthe distillery, as soon as the announcement Valkyrie at Systembolaget.

Description

Sank a † Anna's Distillery Ltd produces absinthe after a traditional method. Product Valkyria Absinthe is good both as an aperitif and drinks.

 

Valkyria Absinthe is made according to the rules, including wormwood, anise and fennel. Herbs soaked in alcohol and distilled. Although coloring is done with herbs bathed in alcohol. The starting point has been a recipe from the late 1800s. No additives at all, just herbs, spirits and water. There is a new craft that has never been performed in Sweden before.

 

The business is located in the mining village Stråssa Lindesbergs municipality. On February 11, 2011 the company bought the village's church and parish, to operate in this. Lindesbergs municipality gave while planning permission for the change of property use.

On August 1, 2011, the company Tax license to manufacture spirits. This condition also caused the company's application for EU funding through the County Administrative Board of Örebro, Rural Development Programme, was granted. On 27th September the company was registered with the NFA and thus being supplied by the company's products are made​​. Right now avsutas dialogues with the monopoly and restaurants. Do YOU ​​want to serve our absinthe? Get in touch NOW!

 

On 23 th October 2011 bottles were the first set of Valkyrie Absinthe. It was a small distilling, to try the recipe on a scale larger than in the laboratory, only 8 liters of finished product. The result has been approved and therefore is Sweden's first commercial absinthe on the bottle! Laboratory tests are now performed by the monopoly's lab in Jordbro and a French lab. This is to get the product approved in the EU.

 

There is more to read about the business:

"http://na.se/nyheter/lindesberg/1.1214541-brannvinstillverkning-startar-is-ta-anna"

 

They also seem to distill in an old Swedish church. I approve.

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Those are extremely good news! :D However, the link just takes me to Facebook's main page.

 

They have enough neutral spirit.

That's Scandinavian alcohol culture in a nutshell: bland and colourless.

Edited by Brynjolfr

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Those are extremely good news! :D However, the link just takes me to Facebook's main page.

 

They have enough neutral spirit.

That's Scandinavian alcohol culture in a nutshell: bland and colourless.

Well now. We're also used to different kind of spiced schnapps. Especially around midsummer. Some brands of these spiced schnapps I'm quite fond of (e.g. schnapps seasoned or spiced with sweet gale (?... in swedish pors according to Google Translate)) but if I had to choose I'd go for absinthe anytime... almost. (Absinthe together with pickled herring at midsummer is actually nothing I'd recommend. I've tried but quickly went for beer and spiced schnapps instead, as is the tradition.)

 

But relating to just our alcohol culture I'll have to agree though. It could be a lot better.

 

Anyway... I certainly hope that this swedish brand, Valkyria Absinthe, makes it really well on the market, at least in Scandinavia! And I also hope that it'll be a contributing source for more knowledge here about what absinthe really is, or at least should be. And of course I look forward to try Valkyria Absinthe, soon I hope. :)

 

From what I've read Valkyria (and Sankta Annas Distillery) seems to have some potential. And priced moderately it'll probably be a hit!

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Neutral Spirit as in high proof Vodka, Everclear, etc. Neutral Spirits are used in the making of Absinthe during the initial maceration and then distillation.

 

But yeah if you want to comment on the drinking culture there be my guest.

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Shouldn't the highest ranking absinthes be macerated using high proof grape based spirits rather than grain or starch based (as used in Swedens top selling Absolut vodka brand)? But I guess it is very hard to tell one resulting absinthe from the other, primarily based on which kind of alcohol is initially used? I guess that in the end it really doesn't matter that much?

 

Historically though, in "ancient" France, I suppose that grape based alcohol was much more expensive due to the Phylloxera infestation in the early 20th century, hence the perception that grape based spirits produce better (?) absinthe.

Edited by SethP

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Neutral Spirit as in high proof Vodka, Everclear, etc. Neutral Spirits are used in the making of Absinthe during the initial maceration and then distillation.

 

But yeah if you want to comment on the drinking culture there be my guest.

 

So when you wrote that "they have enough neutral spirit" you meant that they have enough of it in order to make absinthe? If so, I appologize for misunderstanding you. I interpreted it as "they already got too much neutral spirits, and should try making other types of spirits" (which is what I, as a Swede, personally think; many Swedes care only for binge drinking cheap alcohol, unfortunately).

Edited by Brynjolfr

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Shouldn't the highest ranking absinthes be macerated using high proof grape based spirits rather than grain or starch based ..... I guess that in the end it really doesn't matter that much?

 

If you look at the top 10's list, it seems that you find a mix of base types, so it seem that it can matter but other factors such as herb bill, and distiller's craft matter more. As far as the modern brands go.

 

Historically though, in "ancient" France, I suppose that grape based alcohol was much more expensive due to the Phylloxera infestation in the early 20th century, hence the perception that grape based spirits produce better (?) absinthe.

 

The brands such as the old Pernod that used grape base certainly marketed that way.

 

As for the Valkyria THIS article suggests that they are going to use a sugarcane based spirit. Many use beet sugar, but cane may be unusual?

 

 

 

EDIT: The bold print on sugarcane was not meant to imply that it it some how good, bad, or strange. It may be something as simple that cane sugar is more available in Sweden, as beet sugar is more common in some parts of Europe. Also, the article does not specifically say the absinthe will be cane based.

Edited by TheLoucheyMonster!

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However it turns out, it has to be better than that old class-ick, Kruts Karport. :puke:

Edited by Absomphe

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Rum based? Actually sugarcane spirits can be just as bland as anything else, if you rectify them enough. A very light rum base might suit one of the 'Montpelier' absinthes.

 

Now you got me thinking of firewater, like Venado, which made me think of its (much) fancier sibling, Zacapa Centenario. Centenario and egg nog, mmmmmmmm

 

OK ADD moment over.

 

Edit to add 'be'

Edited by Miguel

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Many bases have been used, I just find that "Grain Neutral Spirits" tend to be one of the most common. That's not to say that strange or flavorful bases don't work.

 

Leopold's uses Chilean Pisco. And I remember something of another American brand using Honeyjack, or honey eau de vie or whatever they decided to call it.

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[...]

As for the Valkyria THIS article suggests that they are going to use a sugarcane based spirit. Many use beet sugar, but cane may be unusual?

 

 

EDIT: The bold print on sugarcane was not meant to imply that it it some how good, bad, or strange. It may be something as simple that cane sugar is more available in Sweden, as beet sugar is more common in some parts of Europe. Also, the article does not specifically say the absinthe will be cane based.

Strange? Sweden is a typical sugar beet country and to my knowledge we have no sugar cane farming och production at all? I could be wrong but my guess is that the article/paper got it wrong. They probably misquoted the owner/manufacturer or something?

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From the article I quoted above:

Vi har ett unikt recept och det är det som är grundbulten i produkten. Var vi sedan kliver in i tillverkningskedjan från sockerrör till färdig flaska vill vi inte säga i dag, även om vi har en uppfattning om det redan nu.

bold emphasis mine

 

google translated:

We have a unique recipe and that is what is the lynchpin of the product. Were we then step into the manufacturing chain from sugar cane to the finished bottle, we do not say today, even if we have an idea of ​​it now.

 

Which also brings up another interesting question, are they making the base from fermentation?

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How they're making, or even if they're making, the base themselves I don't know.

 

Hopefully someone from Sankta Annas Distillery will join WS soon (if they haven't already) and answer any questions, but for now I've at least asked about the article you quoted from on their facebook page. (I'll post their reply as soon as possible.)

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Hartsmar has a thread started on FV, so for those following this brand's birth, be sure to check there for updates.

 

Hopefully someone from Sankta Annas Distillery will join WS soon (if they haven't already) and answer any questions

 

Indeed! Welcome in advance! :cheers:

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Hartsmar has a thread started on FV, so for those following this brand's birth, be sure to check there for updates.

[...]

Hmm. Maybe I'll have to join that site too?

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You should...

 

JoeLegate... It's nice that you like what I've done to the site... that is - updated the news.

Redesign will be launched shortly though. ;)

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[...]

Which also brings up another interesting question, are they making the base from fermentation?

:wave2:

 

I got a pretty quick response to my questions on their facebook page. Their reply to my specific question about sugar cane vs beets is, shortly, that it's actually a coincidence (or a mistake?) that sugar cane is mentioned in the article. At the time for the interview they hadn't decided exactly how to produce their absinthe.

 

Sankta Annas Distillery then describe the process that they now use.

They don't ferment themselves, neither from sugar cane nor beets, grain or anything else. They simply purchases high proof spirits for their main maceration. Then they distill that macerated alcohol to produce absinthe and macerate once again, primarily for colorization. A pretty straight-forward and classic absinthe production method I think? The result, they say, is a top of the range absinthe verte based on only natural ingredients. Just alcohol, herbs and water.

 

Sounds very nice to me! :thumbup:

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They simply purchases high proof spirits for their main maceration. Then they distill that macerated alcohol to produce absinthe and macerate once again, primarily for colorization. A pretty straight-forward and classic absinthe production method I think?

Yup.

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Shouldn't the highest ranking absinthes be macerated using high proof grape based spirits rather than grain or starch based

 

No. Neutral spirits are exactly that, neutral (95% alcohol, and the rest is water). At that point it doesn't matter from what source the sugar was obtained.

 

Sugar cane is a tropical or at best semi-tropical plant. Beets can be grown in northern climates. As such, I would be surprised if an industry in northern Europe made more use of sugar cane sugar than beet sugar.

 

Because you can make absinthe with a pot still, but rectifying alcohol to neutral level is much more efficiently done with a more specialized still, not many absinthe producers make their own neutral spirits, I think.

 

So when you wrote that "they have enough neutral spirit"

 

I assumed it was a political joke.

Edited by Artemis

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Valkyria's facebook reporting excellent first day sales from Systemboleget.

 

Any Swedes watching this thread, don't wait! One outlet sold 8 bottles before lunchtime, and if I read correctly, only 24 bottles per outlet(?)

 

Always nice to see a new traditional absinthe venture get off to a good start! :cheers:

 

Systemboleget

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And I remember something of another American brand using Honeyjack, or honey eau de vie or whatever they decided to call it.

 

Curious to know who that was? We are planning to try using our honey eau de vie as the base for our absinthe verte, but otherwise use a very traditional botanical bill. We also thought to try our beet syrup neutral spirit, just because it was supposedly used historically by some of the French distillers. I believe Germain-Robin absinthe is a honey and apple eau de vie base, but bottled at relatively low proof.

Edited by Blue Star

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I was going to suggest Germain-Robin and their cyser base but ya beat me to it. :pirate:

 

Honey from an absinthe herb field, like from a bee hive stuck in the middle of a wild Montana meadow, untouched by human hands...now that might be interesting.

Edited by baubel

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I read somewhere, that apiary location was crucial to the taste of honey. Commercial bee keepers dump honey from the pollination of most commercial crops.

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I know of Germain-Robin and St. Antione, but it seems like I'm forgetting one brand that used a honey spirit base. La Sorcerie uses grape brandy but maybe I'm thinking of them?

 

As an extremely amateur (noob) mazer, I'm interested in anything that has to do with mead as well.

 

EDIT: Double comma time!

Edited by Evan Camomile

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