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New American Rouge

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This guy mentions reds being popular in eastern Europe which has me skeptical about whether or not this will be a real absinthe. Then he said hibiscus, so maybe he does know what he is doing. Anyone have more information?

 

News Article

 

Producer's Website

 

Having just reviewed some rouge absinthes I'm still looking for more. I know they are rare now as they were back then (if they ever existed), and so far I'm still more curious than anything. I like hibiscus tea and I think that the flavor could blend well with absinthe, but you would really have to work at it.

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I'll try most rouges out there, so this is interesting to me. "Looking at a portfolio of spirits" sounds to me like they're approaching it from the money making side of distilling, and not so much the crafty art producing side of distilling, but what do I know? Perhaps it'll end up being the best rouge on the market.

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My experiences working with Hibiscus have been mixed. It starts out beautiful but the color fades quickly.

R1.jpg

Personally, I have never developed much of a taste for red absinthe but it is an intriguing thought.

 

Haas and Venczel hope to release Toulouse Red by the first quarter of 2012, barring any unforeseen regulatory hurdles.
Most sincerely, good luck with that. ;)

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My experiences working with Hibiscus have been mixed. It starts out beautiful but the color fades quickly.

R1.jpg

 

 

Are you sure the problem isn't Bill sized doses? It's easy to over water those. :laugh: :pirate:

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I like hibiscus tea, but it does not stay bright red. It does not even begin like that. I hope FD&C red is not too tempting to them, and if they do use it, that they still bother to make it a tasty drink.

 

Red works like crazy on hummingbirds though. :)

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Are you sure the problem isn't Bill sized doses? It's easy to over water those. :laugh: :pirate:

 

From what I've heard, the answer could be just that thimble. :paperbag3:

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Are you sure the problem isn't Bill sized doses? It's easy to over water those. :laugh: :pirate:

 

From what I've heard, the answer could be just that thimble. :paperbag3:

 

It's sew easy to overlook the obvious sometimes.

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Jules, the tea my mom used to make was boiled for a long time in a pressure cooker, so the red didn't have a chance. As a little kid I hated it, but learned to like it later. We called it Jamaica Rose Tea.

 

Still, would be an intresting booze, in weather opposite than the one pictured. (I trully admire those that can live in such northern climes)

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I'm not seeing anything there that suggests that these guys know anything about absinthe, but I'm not going to speculate beyond the data.

My experiences working with Hibiscus have been mixed. It starts out beautiful but the color fades quickly.

Hibiscus seems to have become the first thing folks run to to make something red. There are so many other botanicals that are not only more stable, but very absinthe-friendly. I have a rouge absinthe in R&D that sat in a clear bottle in front of a window for three years before going yellow.

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I knew a guy that reduced a bottle of red wine down to about 2 ounces and just added a couple drops per glass. It was some very pretty booze. Just sayin'

 

One must think outside the box from time to time. :cheers:

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Rose petals?

 

What was in a historical rouge? I'm more wondering about the Rosinette recipe if it is still, or was ever, in existence.

 

Not to downplay experimentation, I actually love going in new directions. But you have to know your directions first.

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I knew a guy that reduced a bottle of red wine down to about 2 ounces and just added a couple drops per glass. It was some very pretty booze. Just sayin'

Indeed, it was quite beautiful. Without being too obscure about it, I can add he is one of the more creative people I've ever met and extremely helpful in getting Ridge started. He wouldn't admit it, though.

 

The wine reduction worked like a champ to color booze. I think odds are real good that I would probably burn it. :rolleyes: I think it would be very interesting to color a small batch that way just get a good feel for how it might impact the flavor. I still have issues with the louched color but perhaps it is something I might get over eventually.

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Rose has a much stronger flavor and aroma than hibiscus.

Amen. I know using rose water, that a tiny bit goes a LONG way. With a gallon of iced tea, more than a capful and it's un drinkable because of the overpowering aroma.

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There's a rose hip tea that I enjoy, it's 75% rose hip and 25% hibiscus. It has a pretty strong rose hip flavor, but a very deep red color.

 

Prickly pear fruit can make an interesting purple/fuscia looking absinthe, without adding too much flavor. They don't have much flavor to begin with, kind of like a mild melon.

 

I'm with Gwydion, there are plenty of untapped natural red coloring agents out there.

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Rose has a much stronger flavor and aroma than hibiscus.

Amen. I know using rose water, that a tiny bit goes a LONG way. With a gallon of iced tea, more than a capful and it's un drinkable because of the overpowering aroma.

 

Your both right now that I think about it, I just use so little rose water when do use it.

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I knew a guy that reduced a bottle of red wine down to about 2 ounces and just added a couple drops per glass. It was some very pretty booze. Just sayin'

 

One must think outside the box from time to time. :cheers:

 

I have thought for some time that bone-dry Pinot Noir, for coloring, could be an excellent compliment to a well crafted absinthe.

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Then again, not sure. I know an excellent distiller who produces one of the best products I know who recently tried to create a red absinthe for the 140th anniversary of the french "commune" (yeah, it's not a crime to be a socialist in France).

 

Tried hibiscus like many, but wasn't satisfied. Can't recall what he chose though

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I think it would work best on a mediterranean style better. And therefore enjoyed by people who prefer that style.

 

I'm not losing sleep waiting for a hibiscus rouge either.

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I wonder if they would do better with a rose or pinkish color? Instead of trying to pound the red in them which may be throwing off the flavor. Balance it out and be okay with the color pink. No sense in trying to match the artificial reds out there, as artificial and natural vertes can be worlds apart in color.

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A little red coloring goes a long way. Between un balanced flavor and unatural color, the latter is a lesser evil IF, the flavor is any good. If they market it to the Bourbon street crowd ...

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