Jump to content

 

Photo

Sipping Absinthe ^_^ Reading Text of Some Kind or Another


  • Please log in to reply
168 replies to this topic

#151 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 22 December 2015 - 10:23 AM

Yup.  The main character in question was Kira Yoshinaka, a corrupt official that Asano Naganori attempted to kill, leading Asano to have to commit seppuku.  The Borges' story can be read in his Collected Ficciones.  Pretty sure the book's available online in pdf form, too.  :shifty: 


"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#152 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 22 December 2015 - 01:56 PM

Meditation on inevitable death should be performed daily. Every day when one’s body and mind are at peace, one should meditate upon being ripped apart by arrows, rifles, spears and swords, being carried away by surging waves, being thrown into the midst of a great fire, being struck by lightning, being shaken to death by a great earthquake, falling from thousand-foot cliffs, dying of disease or committing seppuku at the death of one’s master. And every day without fail one should consider himself as dead.

 

The Way of the Samurai is found in death. When it comes to either/or, there is only the quick choice of death. It is not particularly difficult. Be determined and advance. To say that dying without reaching one's aim is to die a dog's death is the frivolous way of sophisticates. When pressed with the choice of life or death, it is not necessary to gain one's aim.

 

 If by setting one's heart right every morning and evening, one is able to live as though his body were already dead, he pains freedom in the Way. His whole life will be without blame, and he will succeed in his calling.

 

 The person without previous resolution to inevitable death makes certain that his death will be in bad form. But if one is resolved to death beforehand, in what way can he be despicable? One should be especially diligent in this concern.

 

 Thus, the Way of the Samurai is, morning after morning, the practice of death, considering whether it will be here or be there, imagining the most sightly way of dying, and putting one's mind firmly in death. Although this may be a most difficult thing, if one will do it, it can be done. There is nothing that one should suppose cannot be done.

 

 It is said that becoming as a dead man in one's daily living is the following of the path of sincerity.

 

 If a warrior is not unattached to life and death, he will be of no use whatsoever.

 

  • Yamamoto Tsunetomo, from Hagakure “The Book of the Samurai”

 

 

 

Generally speaking, the Way of the warrior is resolute acceptance of death.

 

  • Miyamoto Musashi, from Gorin No Sho "Book of Five Rings”

 

 

 

One who is a samurai must before all things keep in mind, by day, and by night, the fact that he has to die. That is his chief business.

 

  • The Bushido Code

"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#153 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 04 February 2016 - 04:14 PM

The Savage Detectives by Roberto Bolano. :heart:


"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#154 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 09 February 2016 - 03:20 PM

Fatality

by Ruben Dario

 

The tree is happy because it is scarcely sentient;
the hard rock is happier still, it feels nothing:
there is no pain as great as being alive,
no burden heavier than that of conscious life.

To be, and to know nothing, and to lack a way,
and the dread of having been, and future terrors...
And the sure terror of being dead tomorrow,
and to suffer all through life and through the darkness,

and through what we do not know and hardly suspect...
And the flesh that temps us with bunches of cool grapes,
and the tomb that awaits us with its funeral sprays,
and not to know where we go,
nor whence we came! ...


"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#155 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 17 February 2016 - 01:33 AM

Mason & Dixon by Thomas Pynchon. :heart:   By far, the best living writer we know.


"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#156 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 19 February 2016 - 08:40 AM

Absalom, Absalom! by William Faulkner. :heart:   Our favorite Faulkner.


"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#157 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 27 February 2016 - 05:29 PM

daniil-kharms-4df70dc2cd293.jpeg

 

Daniil Kharms. :heart:


"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#158 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 01 March 2016 - 08:34 PM

The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann. :heart:


"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#159 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 08 March 2016 - 11:02 PM

Finished off the following works.   :heart:

 

Lost in the Funhouse by John Barthes

One-Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Death in Venice by Thomas Mann

The Haunted Bookshop by Christopher Morley

Masks of the Illuminati by Robert Anton Wilson

The Pledge by Friedrich Durrenmatt

Bluebeard by Max Frisch

Blow-Up: And Other Stories by Julio Cortazar

 

Whew!  Took me about 2 months (rather slow reading rate).  Now, to buy more. :twitchsmile:

 

Just ordered a copy of The Obscene Bird of Night by Jose Donoso.  It looks really good.  Here’s hoping it is. :cheerz:


Edited by Alfred Jarry, 08 March 2016 - 11:16 PM.

"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#160 belewfripp

belewfripp

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 170 posts

Posted 15 March 2016 - 05:46 PM

Absalom, Absalom and The Magic Mountain are two of my favorites, but I'm partial to both Faulkner and Mann in general.  Have you read The Buddenbrooks?


"In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not subversive."   - Bill Watterson


#161 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 15 March 2016 - 06:01 PM

Haven't read Buddenbrooks yet.  Currently reading The Obscene Bird of Night by Jose Donoso.  Good stuff; nice prose (even in translation).  Dark book, though, with a lot of grotesque humor and surreal horror elements (shame that it's out of print).  After this, we might go back to some non-fiction for a while, read some philosophical works by either Russell or maybe Rorty.  Cheers. :cheerz:


Edited by Alfred Jarry, 15 March 2016 - 06:13 PM.

"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#162 Amy Lewis

Amy Lewis

    Member

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 86 posts

Posted 17 March 2016 - 07:40 AM

Sipping CF Berger, reading A Distant Mirror - The Calamitous 14th Century by Barbara W. Tuchman. 

 

One of my very favorite books with my favorite drink :)


Amy Lewis
CEO, The Very Big Corporation
Brussels, Bogata, Beijing, Boston, Barcelona, Belfast, Belgrade, Bremen, Podunk. 


#163 distill my beating heart

distill my beating heart

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 261 posts

Posted 03 April 2016 - 06:20 AM

The demon Sauvage and The Story of the Stone Volume 1 by Cao Xueqin. First of a 5 volume Chinese novel from the 18th century. Must have a lot to say since the first book is over 500 pages. Entertaining, but it will probably be a hard slog for the next few months.


If we make it, we can sit back and relax...

#164 belewfripp

belewfripp

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 170 posts

Posted 03 April 2016 - 07:11 AM

The Dream of the Red Chamber, yes.  Good stuff.  Literary Chinese is often highly elliptical, so translations into English often result in lengthening of the work as implied words and meanings are added to make it more sensible to someone reading in English.

 

It is also remarkably noninflected, meaning things like conjugation, declension and other things familiar to European languages are almost entirely absent.  Chinese readers understand these things through context as opposed to altering the form of the word in question.  This can also result in translations that are lengthier than the original.


"In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not subversive."   - Bill Watterson


#165 Songcatcher

Songcatcher

    Advanced Hillbilly

  • Bronze Member
  • 2,265 posts

Posted 19 April 2016 - 05:40 PM

Vilya Blanche and
Les Chants de Maldoror
by Count Lautréamont
The room it smelled heavy of drinkin',  
and the sad silent song made the hour twice as long,
as I waited for that sun to go sinkin'.

#166 belewfripp

belewfripp

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPip
  • 170 posts

Posted 22 April 2016 - 05:19 AM

Ooh, Lautréamont.  Good stuff.  I haven't read Maldoror since I was in high school.


"In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not subversive."   - Bill Watterson


#167 Alfred Jarry

Alfred Jarry

    Pataphysician

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 914 posts

Posted 21 July 2016 - 06:18 AM

THE MAN WHO WAS THURSDAY by G. K. Chesterton and a nice cup of tea. :heart:


"Anti-alcoholics are unfortunates in the grip of water, that terrible poison, so solvent and corrosive that out of all substances, it has been chosen for washing and scourings, and a drop of water, added to a clear liquid like Absinthe, muddies it."

 

14 Surreal Absurdities I Four Different Faces I Three Poems I Snowy Clouds


#168 Debonair Cajun Rudeboy

Debonair Cajun Rudeboy

    Cajun Magic

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,241 posts

Posted 21 July 2016 - 09:38 AM

Synchronicity is a hell of a thing. :shock: Now I have to check it out.
Absinthe! Comme c'est la douceur de vivre!

Keeping the "Spirit of '69" alive.

"Living well is the best revenge." ~George Herbert

#169 Songcatcher

Songcatcher

    Advanced Hillbilly

  • Bronze Member
  • 2,265 posts

Posted 23 August 2016 - 07:38 PM

A little Lagavulin, and a little light reading. Forgot I had this, it's been tucked away for probably 20 yrs.

Attached File  14067829_10207313238684611_4862276886917862486_o.jpg   59.32KB   0 downloads
The room it smelled heavy of drinkin',  
and the sad silent song made the hour twice as long,
as I waited for that sun to go sinkin'.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright © 2016 The Wormwood Society Absinthe Association