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Improvidius

Secondary Effects: Verte vs. Blanche

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Like so many, my first interest in Absinthe was due to all the mythology - you know, thujone gets you high, etc etc. Since becoming educated (Thank You Wormwood Society!) I've really not thought much about any purported secondary effects, I've just enjoyed some fine Absinthes.

 

However, the only time I ever notice anything that can be described as some kind of secondary effects is when I drink Kübler, which is also the only blanche absinthe I've had (I know, I know, Clandestine I'm sure will blow me away once I spring for a bottle).

 

Anyway, this leads me to my hypothesis that either Kübler in particular or blanche's in general have more noticeable secondary effects than others. Anyone else have this experience at all? I could just be crazy too, so, there is that.

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I find that blanches tend to be sweeter/lighter/less bitter and that can have a different effect than a more bitter or heavy verte, just the same way that (to use whiskey as an example) white dog has different flavors or elements than a whiskey that's been aged for a long time.

 

Neither should bring any secondary effects.

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that was quick....

 

Ten minutes?

 

I was quicker than that on my slowest day. B)

 

 

No, wait...that's what she said. :twitchsmile:

Edited by Absomphe

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Musing over my next choice, I believe a top echelon sour is in order.

 

A Rodenbach Grand Cru, on the morrow, will do quite nicely, methinks. :cheers:

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A Rodenbach Grand Cru, on the morrow, will do quite nicely, methinks. abs-cheers.gif

 

Ah, yes, Grand Cru.... Split a bottle with a friend, once. Sweet cherries, I remember, with a splash of red wine and a douse of vinegar! One of the oddest drinks I've ever had the pleasure of enjoying. Dare I run to consumers and buy a bottle? :devil:

Edited by Alfred Jarry

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I don't know what you mean by secondary effects. I will say that a good absinthe does feel...something. I don't know...I usually describe it as absinthey.

 

I don't think there's anything mystical or drug-like to it; champagne intoxicates me in differently than whiskey, which feels different than tequila, which feels different than red wine. The same is definitely true for absinthe. It's more of a tingly intoxication for me; I don't feel as tired or sluggish while drinking it. I feel it less in my head and more in my body.

 

I have noticed getting this feeling in some absinthe brands more than others. In Obsello it's non-existent, whereas in Vieux Pontarlier it's very noticeable. I haven't noticed a difference between the vertes and the blanches, but that's mostly because I avoid the blanches. They aren't my cup of tea.

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... too much tail?

 

I really can't believe nobody touched this one!

 

In all seriousness, if secondaries were caused by tails, I should be trippin' ballz on the bottle of Kübler I have here... and a couple of others.

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I don't think verte amd blanche make a difference (neither it is, in my opinion, other than placebo or a slight body reaction to essential oils in general). I had been experimenting with 'secondary effects' before buying real absinthe, and absinthe recipes soaked in 160 proof spirits definitely had something (that lucid drunkenness), but since they were disgustingly bitter, it's likely that my body reacted as if I was being poisoned, and the 'effect' was due to that. (As far as I know, we sense bitterness as unpleasant because it helps avoiding poisonous plants.)

 

Well, if there was anything similar with real absinthe, then it was Roquette. One evening, I was quite tired and sleep-deprived, and I was still able to drink 4-5 ounces without getting really drunk, but that was only a little more impressive than drinking vodka with pickles (and not to mention, Roquette has that special taste which may lead to false expectations, hence a stronger placebo). As for blanches and bleues, I've always found them easier to get drunk of. However, in some absinthe-related book, I've read a report from someone in the '80s or '90s who drank la bleue in Switzerland (illegally, of course), and got that funny feeling of soberness through the 4 glasses he had, and I don't think he was supposed to hear about it in advance. Might have been plain excitement as well, though.

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From what I know about distillation, an absinthe containing any relevant amount of methanol would be basically so bad that it couldn't get any worse. If methanol makes it through the preparation of the base spirit and the distillation of the absinthe itself as well, then both processes must have been done with incompetence. It's not at all impossible though; I only find it unlikely. I mean, how come somebody without any idea about proper distillation makes la Bleue in Val-de-Travers? Letting methanol in is like the most serious flaw possible during distillation.

 

(I'm not a distiller myself, but since home distillation of fruit brandy and unregistered stills are now legal in my country, and knowledge about it is being spread, I've picked up quite a bit on boards from advanced distillers. I'm sure we've got some experts here, so please correct me if I'm wrong.)

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The problem with moonshining (HG) would be the lack of Quality Assurance. Many are very good at it, some are absolutely brilliant at it, but with out some QA, there is a possibility of some idiot screwing it up badly. HG whisky ocatioanly end up with people in the hospital, albeit a very small minority. I know If I just went at it, I would be a major health hazard.

 

In short, even if it is legal in your area (congrats to your government for understanding freedom) when it comes to HG, know your sources well.

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If "secondary effects" are defined as those attributed to the herbs in absinthe (and there's nothing else in any real absinthe but water and alcohol), it stands to reason that colored absinthes would have more such effects, not fewer, due to an additional charge of herbs. While it's possible in theory that Kübler contains some alcohol other than ethanol that would lend some effect different than that of ethanol, I very much doubt it.

 

And there is no such thing as too much tail.

 

 

 

Ask any lemur.

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