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"Serving Cerberus hockbones in hell, from the people fouled planets, gnomes wear daisy-chains, nearing nuptials, whilst wielding Nordic war-hammers in the wind and eating extinct dodo eggs," we say to you, good sir, as a warm form of re-welcome! :cheers:

Edited by Alfred Jarry

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I have a serious noobie question to ask. What is the proper way to open a bottle that has a melted plastic seal? I managed to get a few flakes into my bottle of Sauvage when trying to get into it.

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Cut the wax along the split line between cork and bottle, clean/blow out any bits and pieces, and open. That is how I do it. I've learned to do it outside, onacuz wife hates wax in the house. At least it is a T cork. With traditional corks, I discard them for an ex Pacifique T cork. Thankfully I have plenty of empty Pacifique bottles, and a few empty bottles to be. ;)

Edited by Miguel

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Cut the wax along the split line between cork and bottle, clean/blow out any bits and pieces, and open. That is how I do it. I've learned to do it outside, onacuz wife hates wax in the house. At least it is a T cork. With traditional corks, I discard them for an ex Pacifique T cork. Thankfully I have plenty of empty Pacifique bottles, and a few empty bottles to be. ;)

Thanks. I had the right idea. I did exactly that. Got one or two flakes in the bottle still. First time though. I'll be ready next time though. :wave2:

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Sometimes the wax is still brittle, but the warm water still makes it substantially easier to work with. I've found the VdA red wax to be the absolute hardest to work with, but the water makes even that much more manageable.

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Ah. Good point. Thank you, I will use that when I buy JL1901 from Catskill Cellars. :)

I Should have thought of that, I guess I don't work with wax enough. Kinda used to elastomers, but they also behave better when warm. will keep in mind.

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I run the wax under warm water. It softens the wax to the point that you can peel it off most of the time. No flakes! :)

 

Yes, I found out about the warm water trick a little too late this time. That is what I'm doing for sure next time.

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... my method of "slow, with lots of blowing"...

 

Not touchin' it.

 

However, I never thought of it before, but I think it's time someone tried a blow-dryer on the wax for a couple of minutes. It should be the same result as warm/hot water, without the potential problems of water.

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I think I'll wait for the next super-duper last time limited run. :devil:

 

And... still waiting.

 

Emile Pernot managed to come out with a mixed "second release" that also sold out quickly but most of us originally thought that Sauvage was a one time deal limited to X number of bottles and so on.

 

There might be more planned but the only people who could really answer that would be those who work for Emile Pernot. Considering the hype and good reviews I'd wildcraft and distill another batch every now and then, were I able to make the decision.

Edited by Evan Camomile

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Heat gun at 45 degree angle from the top of the bottle for 20 seconds or so, 8 inches away while slowing spinning the bottle. The absinthe stays cool, and the wax peels off like soft butter. I've done this twice on the real plastic-like, tough sealants. The Pernot wax usually shatters off if you look at it the right way.

Edited by Scott M.

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There might be more planned but the only people who could really answer that would be those who work for Emile Pernot. Considering the hype and good reviews I'd wildcraft and distill another batch every now and then, were I able to make the decision.

 

sure hope it will be sooner rather than later :unsure:

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Pernot has some other really good products, and you could always search for absinthes that are more wormwood-forward among the reviews. :thumbup:

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Actually, Authentique, also by Pernot, shares much more in sprit with Sauvage than BDJ. Minette, also distilled at Pernot, but created by Luc Santiago and sold through Verte D'Abinthe, is right up there in many ways, with Sauvage, but I actually like it more.

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I completely disagree about Authentique. It's really, really good, but I didn't notice as many similarities as the BdJ (or really, very many similarities at all, other than them both being delicious).

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For me, that unique "Pernot personality" that is present in a great deal of what they distill, largely due to the Pontarlier wormwood, is present more in the Authentique than in the BDJ, even though BDJ is also made there. I think Authentique tastes a bit more like Sauvage than BDJ does. However, everyone perceives things differently. I'm just impressed at how many things you've had in such a short time, Ambear. You guys have really thrown yourselves into this quickly. I can relate!

Edited by Scott M.

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I was just talking to someone about this recently. Each distiller has their own "hallmark" whether they try to or not, that makes it easy sometimes to recognize the creator fro product to product. For me, I think the Matter "flavor" is most noticeable to my palette, but a lot of of people mention the Jade thing as well.

 

We've certainly had help from many wonderful people. The absinthe community is a great one to be friends with.

 

Ain't that the truth...

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