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MrGreenGenes

Drilling Regular Glass

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I need to photograph my own Frankenstein of a fountain, but might add that substituting silicone gasket material seemed to work a lot better for me than the original rubber gaskets/washers that came with the spigots. The silicone gaskets were cut from a short length of 1/2" or perhaps 3/8" silicone tubing.

 

A bit of cross-posting, but this is more appropriate over here... Just a mock-up (no ice/water or actual louching going on). I went with only two spigots given the small container size. Besides, I figure it will mostly be used for just the wife and me. Mostly just me, actually. Gimp, your "personal" design is spot on.

...snip attachment....

 

Secondary view:

 

...snip attachment...

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Nice looking job! Good going.

 

As fore drilling plexiglas, I have found that WD-40 makes a good cutting fluid.

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After an initial failure on my first hole and a $6 square cookie jar for that reason (ala Walmart), I drilled four successive holes with a handheld variable speed drill and 3/8” glass bit. I taped the inside and outside surfaces with transparent packing tape, and drilled dry, applying light pressure and relatively slow speed and pausing periodically to blow away the glass dust, etc. I also reapplied the outer tape initially after the drill bit stopped dancing around and finally found purchase.

 

The trick IMO is, after the drill bit tip has penetrated through the glass, to slow the speed down considerably, take all the pressure off the glass, even the weight of the drill, and hold the bit as vertically straight as you can to minimize vibration and spalling. If the bit is vibrating, your drill speed is too fast. You can monitor your progress by watching the glass dust accumulate per bit revolution. The closer you are to completing the full diameter hole, the finer the touch.

 

Didn’t have another failure. The key is light pressure, even in the beginning. It also seemed to help that I drilled all my holes at the same time, so that I maintained the same touch and technique for each drilling phase. It actually went faster than you imagine from reading this (just two whiskey tumblers of Kallie red).

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Any ideas or suggestions for locating spigots would help.

 

I ordered my spigots from Aftosa (just as Hiram has recommended in earlier posts). They have the best price I could find. However, if you are looking for spigots in chrome instead of brass, check this site out:

 

infused-vodka.com

 

I haven't ordered from them, but their cost per spigot is a good bit higher than Aftosa or this vendor:

 

Bailey Ceramic Supply

 

Another point about the construction. I bent the brass washers (located under the brass nuts on the inside) to better match the curvature of the glass. I think it made the silicone gasket/washers seal a little better. I also cut the stems (?) about 3/8" shorter so they wouldn't stick so far into the interior. Makes the nut look almost flush with the threaded stem. Not that you can really see it when it is filled.

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Drilling holes in glass is not too tough if you use stuff designed for stained glass. The bits I've used in the past are quite small, maybe 1/8 inch in diameter. You place a wet sponge adjacent to the bit so it soaks up water, and drill a "small" hole first. Actually, I think small dremel would work great. The stained glass bits have diamond dust on the sides. The key is to drill a small hole first, then it's just a matter of grinding the hole bigger rather than trying to drill big hole first (that sounds obscern, heh.)

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I used a diamond burr on a variable speed Dremel. Used light pressure and kept moving in small circles. Practicing patience. After the hole is started, just worked my way around until the hole was the right size. The burr I used was made for my turbo engraver rated for 200,000 + rpm's.

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