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Worst Absinthe Misinformation You Have Ever Heard

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According to David Thewlis in the Mike Leigh film Naked, the Russian translation for the word wormwood is Chernobyl.  I think that's some Nostradamus type BS though, as Wormwood is Russian is ??????, whereas Chernobyl in Russian is ????????.

 

Edit:  I tried to in put the cyrillic characters but the site won't display them.  Oh well, the bottom line is they're different.

"Chernobyl" is ukrainian (and russian, but the infamous power plant is in Ukraine) for mugwort. Litteraly, it means 'black stalk'.

 

The russian/ukrainian word for wormwood is 'polyn', but that word actually doesn't say much more than that the herb in question is of the Artemisia family; mugwort is also called 'polyn obyknovennaya' (russian)/ 'polyn zvichaynyj' (ukrainian), while A. absinthium is 'polyn gorkaya'(russian)/'polyn girkyj' (ukrainian).

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I've also been assured, in a very authoritative tone, that the real thing contains opium.  Any idiot knows that.

They're thinking of Ouzo (traditional Ouzo, not the export stuff).

 

I don't think I've heard anything truly outrageous; just the usual round of "dude, I was like totally trippin' balz on this real absinthe that this friend of mine made". Of course, Zarquon only knows what his friend put in it (probably a whole lot of stuff not normally included in traditional recipes, knowing him). Also heard the opiate thing, and how certain artists and writers were driven crazy by the stuff.

 

I do have one aquaintance who insists that "real" absinthe is an ancient "magickal" drink and "originally" contained a number of different psychoactive plants, something along the lines of "alamout black".

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Make sure there is no man or woman, clan or tribe among you today whose heart turns away from the LORD our God to go and worship the gods of those nations; make sure there is no root among you that produces such bitter poison.

 

God must have tried Dr. O's stuff. :O-Bomb:

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According to David Thewlis in the Mike Leigh film Naked, the Russian translation for the word wormwood is Chernobyl.  I think that's some Nostradamus type BS though ,...  Oh well, the bottom line is they're different.

The Wikipedia covers this here.

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Yeah.  All  those "real" ancient formulas fall right apart when you tell someone to cite an authoritative source.

Particularly when most of the people making the claims consider sources like Aleister Crowley to be authoritative.

You were kidding about the ouzo, right?

Nope.

 

Ouzo originated in Turkey (where it was known as raki), and was spread to Europe via the Ottoman empire. It was an herbal liqueur similar to absinthe (but without the wormwood). It became particularly popular in Greece, and many small distilleries cropped up around the region. Quality and recipes varied widely, much as with absinthe in France and Switzerland, and aquavit in the Scandanavian countries. Some ingredients were used in pretty much all variants, most notably the signature flavouring, anise; but also commonly used were mint, clove, coriander, fennel, angelica, and liquorice.

 

Some of the Turkish, and later Greek, variations contained a small amount of opiates - either from opium itself, or from poppy heads or leaves. Not nearly at the level of laudanum, but enough to have an effect beyond that of the alcohol itself. There were even commercial brands available that included opium in the recipe well into the 20th century; until Greece adopted drug laws similar to those being enforced through the rest of Europe. I don't think any of these were ever actually exported, however. I think some current commerical brands still use poppy seeds as a flavouring.

 

There are a number of micro-distillers still around, usually individuals or small local producers that produce exclusively for their local community; and the liqueur is more commonly known as tsipouro, rather than ouzo, though it's effectively the same thing. A few do still produce opium-containing variants. Back in the '80s, my partner had a Greek friend who managed to smuggle in a bottle of one of the opium-containing micros. The best ouzos are said to be made in Lesvos, but it's very hard to get any of them here. The stuff most commonly available in the US, at least in my state, is crap.

 

It's traditionally drunk much like absinthe, though without the sugar, and louches similarly.

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Ouzo is just a kind of tsipouro that is very high in anise and not completely distilled from grapes but mixed with oils. The best ouzo I have tried is ouzo 12 and as for tsipouro and raki (which everybody drinks alot of here in Greece) the only ones worth drinking are always privately distilled by someones grandfather. Sometimes they are very good but also very different from one another depending on the distiller and the herbs and process he uses. Even the ones served at restaurants are very rarely commercial. Raki is a kind of tsipouro originating from Crete which has no anise in it and is kind of yellowish. The interesting thing is that I have come across "green tsipouro" from greek monasteries which was made using "herbs with healing properties". Didnt happen to try it.

 

There is no HG ouzo. Only HG raki-tsipouro. Ouzo is just a product (a kind of tsipouro) that the government has set some standards for and to be used mostly by tourists and for exports. It is generaly low quality. The real stuff is only HG and is never called ouzo as far as I know.

 

The name ouzo came from some tsipouro that was exported in a box that wrote USO Massalia (which means it was to be used in Massalia). That specific tsipouro was high in anise and maybe because of the lack of absinthe at that time was especialy liked in other countries. So it became popular in Greece as well and the "USO" was pronounced "ouzo" by the greeks. So the government made some rules about it and made it something like its national drink (maybe because they didnt like the turkish origin of the names of raki and tsipouro. At that time there was alot of struggle to seperate from the "uncivilized" turks and become "europeans").

 

So I guess ouzo is the commercial version of the traditional drink tsipouro. Its much like with tekila and mezcal.

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Interesting Jack. Where's that from?

 

Luchog: Can you cite some sources for the opium thing? I'd like to read up on it. No doubt there are people who have mixed it, just like a few people put laudanum in their absinthe and PCP in their joints, but I'm not finding anything to support that it was ever customary.

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Jack is quoting a post by Giorgos from a while back on the FV forum.

 

I can confirm that local Lesvos brands are among the best ouzos available, but I have never heard about the opium thing.

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The lab samples were exact repros of the original pre-ban lab samples ( though these must have been hella hard to find )

The Distiller's Proofs were exact repros of the pre-ban DPs. And in those days, people had to travel to Rome to the actual forum to whine about paying for distiller's proofs.

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And in those days, people had to travel to Rome to the actual forum to whine...

"Hipsters, flipsters, and finger-poppin' daddies: knock me your lobes!

I came to lay Caesar out, not to hip you to him. The bad jazz that a cat blows wails long after he's cut out. The groovy is often stashed with their frames..."

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I heard the DJ BJ say something about absinthe being in the bible. That's gotta count for something in the idiot awards.

The third angel sounded his trumpet, and a great star, blazing like a torch, fell from the sky on a third of the rivers and on the springs of water— the name of the star is Wormwood.[a] A third of the waters turned bitter, and many people died from the waters that had become bitter.

Either Revelations or the Book of Jorge -- can't recall right off hand.

Proof that noone really reads signatures

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Luchog: Can you cite some sources for the opium thing?  I'd like to read up on it.  No doubt there are people who have mixed it, just like a few people put laudanum in their absinthe and PCP in their joints, but I'm not finding anything to support that it was ever customary.

Unfortunately, most of my books are in storage; and I can't seen to find anything online, at least not in English, so I can't tell how reliable it is.

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Found on ebay:

Grandiflorum Perfumes: Absinthe EDP. New In Box! 60ml/2oz. Grandiflorum perfumes are blended from the world's finest plant extracts and are batch tested for purity. 100% pure and natural.

 

ABSINTHE: alluring, enigmatic. This full-bodied perfume recalls Paris where poets and artists gathered in cafes to sip absinthe. Like its legendary name-sake, this heady perfume is built on a base or wormwood, which is sharp, intensely herbal and smells almost chocolatey. Vanilla adds a smoothing sweetness. Orange, grapefruit and rosewood round out this intoxicating composition.

Retails for $48.00.

 

Chocolate, vanilla, orange, grapefruit, and rosewood oil. This perfume sounds so authentic I'll bet it louches.

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Heady perfume! Heady perfume! At last!

 

Let's have it tested for thujone..if it turns red, you'll be braindead(I need to go to bed)

 

Could you post a link for that?

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