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Jetzster

Sipping Absinthe ;) Listenin' to Music

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I'm one of those silly people who thinks that we can have meaningful discussions about things like art and music, even if our tastes are different. In fact it is the differences that make the conversation worthwhile. Still, it is most enjoyable when done with empathy and respect and it is easy to go over the top without realizing. I hope no one took offense, as that is never my intention

 

I sure didn't. I read your post carefully, and as I understood it, you were into a specific type of music and passed through a decade that had a dearth of it. Can't argue with that at all. My response wasn't intended to be confrontational or argumentative in any way. I just threw out some things that I enjoyed in that decade to show my experience was different. Admittedly, most of those bands started in the 70s, and I was into "New Wave" at the time ... My comment about Depeche Mode and soul was strictly a matter of "check this out, maybe you'll see in it what I saw". My taste in music now is more eclectic than ever before. I've been putting a playlist together, and Hoagy Carmichael is in there right next to Ministry. But there has always been room for Blues and Bluegrass.

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I was a buyer for Tower Records in NOLA in the late 80s. Saw sooooo many acts that just weren't too good but definitely held on to some gems. The genre of music I tend to bend my ear toward (especially back then) is alternative anyway. Acts like the Sugarcubes and The Church would be played over the speakers when I'd be working or even obscure The Tear Garden or mainstream The Police (you know, "Ghost in the Machine" and Synchronicity"?).

 

If we're looking for 80's tunes that had soul and some grit that you'd hear at a Tower Records, Waterboys, Sonic Youth, Pretenders, English Beat, Joe Jackson, PiL, P Furs, Pixies, the Jam, Style Council, Billy Bragg, earlier Echo, earlier U2, the Alarm, the Replacements....

 

Then there's all the Hip Hop and West Coast Punk. Lotsa soulful stuff out there in those days. Just had to turn off the radio.

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[sNIP] Let me stick my neck out a little farther. I associate the 80s with stuff like Journey and Foreigner.[sNIP]

This reminds me of a schizophrenic friend/roommate I lived with for a few months. He always spoke of "the other 80s," a sarcastic reference to the very popular, but very bombastic and cheesy bands of that decade which overshadowed the ones which he and I liked. (However, he also had a genuine fondness for ABBA. I mentioned the schizophrenia thing, right?)

 

Anyway, similar to Artemis, I had a different experience than you did of the 80s, and I still love a lot of music from that time (R.E.M. and Midnight Oil are two I enjoy that I haven't seen mentioned yet). For some reason, though, I have a feeling that you might enjoy Sonic Youth, probably the best band to come out of the 80s that most folks never actually heard in that decade. In particular, I recommend the Sister album.

 

So, in honor of my schizophrenic friend (who sadly disappeared from his parents' home several years ago and was never seen again), here's a link to

, the first track. I think I'll go have that drink now.

[Edit: good call, Leopold. I had the reply page up a while before actually typing, and didn't see your post until I'd made mine. Seconded on The Waterboys nod.]

Edited by Jay

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I actually enjoyed a lot of stuff that Journey and Abba did (still do), and to a lesser extent, Foreigner. I had a friend who was a big Journey fan, and he got irate one day when I told him that Journey and Boston were interchangeable (we both agreed that Boston sucked). He got over it, though. Until the day he died he and I had a running joke: Boston would come on the radio and one of us would say, "Journey!" and vice versa. He got his musical cues from listening to the radio (stadium rock) and I got mine from Saturday Night Live (Devo, Talking Heads, Leon Redbone, Kid Creole and the Coconuts), and Trouser Press (Siouxsie and the Banshees, Adam and the Ants, XTC). It's all good when it's good.

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As a teen I loved Boston, but when I listen to what I thought was awesome, meh, I back out and listen to something else on the pod. Even ABBA sounds better now, although as a preteen, I just liked the girls in ABBA.

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They were hot! Now they are little old grannies.

 

Well that is true of all the folks who were 'hot' back in the 1970s, they are old and wrinkly now. :)

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Trouser Press

I never read the actual magazines, but I've got the Trouser Press guides on my bookshelf right now. To this day, I can still thumb through them and find a band that I've never heard before that the review makes me want to check out. I remember The Big Takeover being another fine music magazine as well, but it's been a long time since I've read any of those.

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Never, Skol, never. :) it's great to be able to express our opinions, ya know?

 

I was a buyer for Tower Records in NOLA in the late 80s. Saw sooooo many acts that just weren't too good but definitely held on to some gems. The genre of music I tend to bend my ear toward (especially back then) is alternative anyway. Acts like the Sugarcubes and The Church would be played over the speakers when I'd be working or even obscure The Tear Garden or mainstream The Police (you know, "Ghost in the Machine" and Synchronicity"?).

 

I was also a BIG Pat Metheny fan in the 80s and "Offramp" is simply a masterpiece as is "Still Life Talking". Why don't you go to YouTube and listen to "Are You Going with Me" and tell me what you think about that bad ass piece of music?

 

Just a very tiny example of some of the GOOD and original stuff going on in the 80s that wasn't vapid noise. There are plenty more acts so we can't just skip over 10 years of music and say "I didn't hear it". Perhaps you weren't listening, or wanting to listen? I have plenty more examples if you're intersted and not all electronic or new wave. Give Pat Metheny a listen. That track is mind blowing. Whole album is. Once you listen, come back and let me know what you think? That way I can get an idea of what YOUR ears pick up and we can go from there with others to expand your 80s horizons. On my iPhone now, otherwise, I'd include the link.

 

Found it. Are you going with me is a beautiful piece of music. I like the harp work. While I was there I checked out a couple of his covers. He is a very accomplished guitarist. Nice arrangements. All pretty subdued. Very nice, all in all.

 

I appreciate it for what it is, and I enjoy listening to it. But, my man, if you've got any hard driving, blues based, three chord rock and roll in there, now is the time to break it out. It ain't sophisticated. The words don't necessarily carry any meaning. I don't in the least blame classical-music-types for rolling their eyes when Suzie-Q comes through the speakers, but it's in my DNA.

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I sure didn't. I read your post carefully, and as I understood it, you were into a specific type of music and passed through a decade that had a dearth of it. Can't argue with that at all. My response wasn't intended to be confrontational or argumentative in any way. I just threw out some things that I enjoyed in that decade to show my experience was different. Admittedly, most of those bands started in the 70s, and I was into "New Wave" at the time ... My comment about Depeche Mode and soul was strictly a matter of "check this out, maybe you'll see in it what I saw". My taste in music now is more eclectic than ever before. I've been putting a playlist together, and Hoagy Carmichael is in there right next to Ministry. But there has always been room for Blues and Bluegrass.

Right on. You hit it on the head. Sometimes I'm just late to the party, like I didn't figure out what punk was about until it was over. From time to time I try to discover what all those people find so enthralling about classical music. It's probably easier if you have a guide. I'm still not sure really sure what "New Wave" is. Maybe you could post a couple links for me.

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If we're looking for 80's tunes that had soul and some grit that you'd hear at a Tower Records, Waterboys, Sonic Youth, Pretenders, English Beat, Joe Jackson, PiL, P Furs, Pixies, the Jam, Style Council, Billy Bragg, earlier Echo, earlier U2, the Alarm, the Replacements....

 

Then there's all the Hip Hop and West Coast Punk. Lotsa soulful stuff out there in those days. Just had to turn off the radio.

That'll keep me busy for a while.

 

Schitzoprenic!? I'm bleeding quadrophenic!

 

Dwayne Eddy and Jade Edouard tonight.

Eddy 'n' Eddy. Heh, Heh.

Cheers

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Just had to turn off the radio.

A good idea for music lovers of any generation.

 

 

I disagree. Community radio is amazing for hearing new artists and styles of music.

The community radio in my hometown opened up a world of new music for me.

 

Check out http://cjtr.ca/index, you can listen online. Rarely will you hear the same song twice. I even heard someone read all of Ginsberg's "Howl" once, which was a treat.

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You might be lucky then, but our community radio just plays dubstep and awful teenage girl singer/songwriters.

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Back in the day I was introduced to a lot of good music by the Tulane University radio station, on the static-y edge of its range (maybe 40 miles).

Sometimes I'm just late to the party, like I didn't figure out what punk was about until it was over. From time to time I try to discover what all those people find so enthralling about classical music. It's probably easier if you have a guide. I'm still not sure really sure what "New Wave" is. Maybe you could post a couple links for me.

An old timer at Fee Verte Forum, Lord Hobgoblin (a Brit) could expound at great length about the differences between Punk and New Wave. I'm not crazy about things being labeled and dissected in that way, but I thought that Punk was an anti-MusicIndustry revolution by young people in clammy garages who couldn't play their instruments but wanted to make some noise, record companies be damned. Obviously, some of them got signed to record deals. I would cite the Sex Pistols as probably the most notable example. Any band that would tour Texas, endure the storm of thrown Lone Star longnecks, and flip off the crowd has something going for them. Many years later they were invited to the Rock and Roll "Hall of Fame" and wiped their asses with the invitation. As I understand it, New Wave developed out of Punk - the attitude was similar but the New Wave bands could actually play their instruments, or learned to as time went by. Here's Siouxsie and the Banshees from 1988:

Talk about three chords, there's not much more than one in The Killing Jar. Yet they do so much with it. That busy guy on the cello even makes me take my eyes off of Siouxsie (drool) for a while.

Much of New Wave was heavy on the synthesizers (Gary Numan), but I like a little weirdness with my synth. More than a little, in the case of Devo:

Danny Elfman with his trademark evil smile, fronting Oingo Boingo:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9PMI4XcUTgY...feature=related

I think this was Oingo Boingo's farewell concert:

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I feel that your definitions are spot on. And because I appreciate some artistry in my rock, I'm not so much a fan of Punk, but love New Wave .... or as it's labeled these days, "Classic Alternative".

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You might be lucky then, but our community radio just plays dubstep and awful teenage girl singer/songwriters.

Maybe in your area. Mine plays bluegrass and awful teenage singer/songwriters.

 

No offense to the multitudes of bluegrass fans but it's just not my thing.

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Another thing occurred to me as I was musing on Devo. One of the endearing things about so many of the brilliant New Wave acts, is that they didn't take themselves too seriously. Can't say the same for the stadium-filling rock gods, nor the angry punk bands.

You can't fit all Bluegrass in the same bucket, either. There's formula Bluegrass, and then there's:

Carolina Chocolate Drops:

Hayseed Dixie covering, of all things, the Scissor Sisters:

Crooked Still (I'm a sucker for cellos):

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No offense to the multitudes of bluegrass fans but it's just not my thing.

Neither me.

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Don't know anything about Hayseed Dixie or Crooked Still, but I wouldn't call the CCDs Bluegrass. I really think they're some form of roots.

I was introduced to Hayseed Dixie (they did a lot of AC/DC covers) by way of an interview the guy in the baseball cap in the Hayseed Dixie video (above) did on the Roe Conn show on WLS radio out of Chicago years ago. Roe tried to pursue an analytical line such as that with him and got told something like "it's all just music, man; I don't know what the rest of that crap means". I stand corrected. ;)

Edited by Artemis

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Yeah, I know. It's all OK. I'm no big fan of Bluegrass either, but I respect it, and even enjoy it from time to time. I would also say that it is probably 2nd only to Jazz as a uniquely American form of music.

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Yeah, if I use one of those labels, it's just a convenient handle for pulling something off the shelf, it's not a brand like the cowboys use on a steer. Now, when it comes to the REAL Cowboy music, .... never mind. :cheers:

Edited by Artemis

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That CCD video was made right up the road from me. Theyre a fine bunch of traditional southern folk musicians. Bluegrass in Colorado? Who'd a thunk it? While commercial bluegrass is one thing, Old time mountain music is another animal completely. Bluegrass was formed by Bill Monroe melding country blues, southern gospel, and western music. Old time mountain music came from the Irish, English and Scotch immigrants who brought their music with them when they came to America. Having no means to buy instruments most were made by the folks who wanted to keep their music alive. The ducimer is an entirely American instrument. While the banjo is of African origin. The fiddle has always been a very versatile instrument suited to many music forms.

Edited by Songcatcher

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