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Luisito

Greetings from Argentina

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Hello to everyone!

 

After lurking anonymously for some time I decided to jump in…

 

As the topic title says, I am from Argentina and have been an absintheur for quite some time…

I was fascinated by the history of absinthe long before I could actually put my hands on a glass of it.

Once I could finally taste it, what was just a teenage crush on the idea became deep, everlasting love with the real thing…

 

But it is really hard to be an absinthe enthusiast here, in the bottom of the World.

Only a few European brands make it here, and certainly not the good ones… only industrialized, artificially colored brands. Not to mention some “bohemian” absinths (yes, without the “e”).

 

So I have to order online (and shipping to Argentina is expensive!) or rely on the good will of friends and acquaintances that travel to Europe or the US from time to time...

And, honestly, I’m starting to become paranoid that they will end up killing me in my sleep if I continue to bother them with this (I’m not buying their sarcastic “yes, of course, I will be delighted to bring your precious bottle of absinthe” any more).

 

Anyway, Argentina has a rich absinthe tradition. In fact, it was the only South American country in which absinthe was made (and one out of three Latin American countries, along with Mexico and Cuba).

Absinthe was a recurrent theme in the literature of late 19th century and early 20th century, particularly in tango lyrics… It really became a part of tango mythology.

 

Here, the ban on absinthe took place in the early 20’s, and was lifted in 2009, but the lift on the ban happened very quietly, there was no law change involved, just a single article of the “Código Alimentario Argentino” (“Argentine food code”) that was repealed.

 

It’s because of that that, to most people here, the legal status of absinthe is, at best, blurry; when in reality there should be no doubt, absinthe is legal again.

That misinformation is taken advantage of by unscrupulous importers and vendors, who resort to using all of the “classic” gimmicks in order to advertise what they sell (“high thujone content”, “mind bending”, “psychoactive”, and so on)…

 

I’m so tired of the fact that many, especially the young, are sort of fascinated by this “new” fashionable and exotic drink that comes from Europe, without realizing that there is no need to create a new (and fake) tradition, but to rescue and bring back an old, very rich one…

 

Well, I hope that this first post was not too long and boring!

 

Greetings again from the Southern Cone

 

Luisito

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Welcome to the forum, glad you joined the fight against ignorance, and unethical vendors!

 

I'm having similar issues, having to mail order most of my stuff. This place, and its senior members, are a great info source for absinthe. I can just imagine the classic painting 'El ajenjo' but with Mafalda sitting at a bistro with a glass of absinthe. :)

:wave2: :cheers:

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Not boring at all! Don't hesitate to tell us more of your country's absinthe history.

 

Welcome to the Forum. :cheers:

 

I will, definitely!

 

I've been doing quite a bit of research...

 

Once I finish organizing the info, I will come up with a series of posts about the history of absinthe in Argentina and the impact it had on the Argentine culture of the early 20th century...

 

Thanks to all for the warm welcome!

 

Luisito

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Sounds like the beginning of my relationship with absinthe too. Ahh...to be young again.

 

Hello and welcome! :cheers:

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:wave2: Hello and welcome, Luisito!

There's nothing boring about learning about other cultures (especially in reference to absinthe) ;)

I don't know if it's available in Argentina, but I believe Absinto Camargo is produced in Brazil. I've had the wormwood-free US version, and can't really recommend it, but maybe the real thing is better...?

:cheers:

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:wave2: Hello and welcome, Luisito!

There's nothing boring about learning about other cultures (especially in reference to absinthe) ;)

I don't know if it's available in Argentina, but I believe Absinto Camargo is produced in Brazil. I've had the wormwood-free US version, and can't really recommend it, but maybe the real thing is better...?

:cheers:

 

Hi sardonix... thanks for the welcome!

 

I haven't seen absinthe Camargo on the shelves here in Argentina, but I had the opportunity to try it in Brazil... it was just one glass and in a situation in which I could not be very "rigorous" with the tasting (it was at a social gathering, in a bar), so I can't be very specific.

 

What I can say is that I did not particularly enjoyed it.

It is artificially colored (stated on the label, and very noticeable) and to me, the wormwood and the anise seemed very unbalanced (to the wormwood side), and hence there was a very faint, almost non noticeable, louche...

 

I really can't say more because I was not on "rigorous tasting mode", but rather on "enjoying the party" mode.

 

 

 

:cheers:

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Howdy Podner. :cheers:

 

Anyway, Argentina has a rich absinthe tradition.

 

Indeed, I get a little giggly every time I run across Borges mentioning it.

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Sounds like I may have to learn to dance one of these days. :cheers:

:laf: Looks like you'll have to find a coordinated partner as well.

 

 

Nice icon picture, by the way!

 

I agree. :cheers:

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