Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
bksmithey

DP Rye Dog bottled and available

Recommended Posts

I ordered mine Monday. They had it in route Tuesday morning. That Catskill bunch are alright by me.

 

There was also some Voyager gin in that order. I just have to keep some good stuff around the house. :)

 

 

 

Edit: The delivery date is set for Friday........just in time I'd think. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy pricetag, Batman!

 

I'd order some, but I'm not that much of a whiskey fan. I like to use rye to make Monteleone's and that's about it. I'll leave this rare and more then likely excellent whiskey to the whiskey lovers who can truly appreciate it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Holy pricetag, Batman!

 

I'd order some, but

I can't afford that much for rye whiskey. I'm sure it's excellent though, based on Cheryl's other output. If anyone would like to come back and post a review here, I'd love to read it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

....and worth every damn penny, IMHO. This is a fantastic small-batch, artisinal unaged whiskey.

 

I got my bottle yesterday and had the chance to try it neat and in a few cocktails last night. It has the same basic profile as other unaged whiskies (those characteristic notes of fresh-baked bread and melon), but with a unique malty rye spiciness in the finish. It's also very smooth, despite the proof. I've tried a few other "white dog" whiskies (Death's Door, Buffalo Trace, MB Roland), and Rye Dog is far and away the best I've had.

 

It's terrific on its own, but it's great fun trying to come up with cocktail applications for unaged whiskey, especially "white dog" variations on already established drinks. For those of you who bought a bottle and are wondering what you can do with it, there are a few good recipes out there, like the White Manhattan and the Good Word (a twist on the Last Word). Toby Maloney also came up with a variation on the Vieux Carre that he calls the New Carre. It was published in the Tennessean last summer, but I can't seem to find the link online. Here's the recipe: 1 oz. white whiskey, 1 oz. pisco, 1/2 oz. dry vermouth, 1/8 oz. Benedictine, 13 drops orange bitters, 13 drops grapefruit bitters. Stir with ice and strain; garnish with lemon twist.

 

Here's my own recipe, based on the famed Algonquin cocktail. I call it the Puritan, partly because of the pale color and lack of garnish, but also because the Algonquin hotel was originally called the Puritan. I liked the idea of "de-aging" both the hotel and the whiskey in the cocktail. Rye Dog is fantastic in this.

 

PURITAN

 

1.5 oz. DP Rye Dog

.75 oz. fresh pineapple juice*

.75 oz. Dolin blanc vermouth

1 healthy dash Regan's orange bitters

 

Shake with ice and strain into chilled cocktail glass. No garnish. Enjoy!

 

*Fresh pineapple juice works wonders in cocktails calling for it and it's easy to make. Just buy cubed fresh pineapple at the grocery store, muddle a few chunks in a bowl, dump the muddled pieces in a fine-mesh strainer positioned over a receptacle, and gently press on the pineapple with your muddler to squeeze out the juice into the receptacle. If you use bottled juice, make sure it's a not-from-concentrate, unsweetened, 100% juice brand like Lakewood.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds nice!

 

I was thinking of whipping up a big batch of a rye based cocktail with it, then aging it in one of my barrels.

 

Possibly a variation on a Sazerac or diamondback with some herb infused simple syrup...

 

Hmmmm. :g:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was thinking of whipping up a big batch of a rye based cocktail with it, then aging it in one of my barrels.

 

Sort of misses the point, doesn't it? ;)

 

Sounds like an interesting experiment, though. I'm planning on playing around with (unaged) Sazeracs tonight myself. It also occurs to me that white whiskey could be a good substitute for Genever in cocktails...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the recipe pointers, AiO. I picked up one of the little bottles of BT white dog a while back, and while a few friends and I have had a taste, I really couldn't figure out what to do with it so it's been overlooked for a while.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Buffalo Trace white dog is pretty good stuff. It's barrel strength, though, so you'll want to add a little water to the above cocktail recipes to bring it down to about 100 proof. Otherwise, it'll totally overwhelm the drinks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I was thinking of whipping up a big batch of a rye based cocktail with it, then aging it in one of my barrels.

 

Sort of misses the point, doesn't it? ;)

Nah, that's the exact point. It's interesting to see how the spirit ages. Wasmunds actually sells their Malt and Rye White Dogs with little 2 liter barrels so you can age them yourself.

 

Plus, then I'll be able to make up a fresh one and taste it side by side with an aged one, which is always a fun experiment.

 

I used some of the Wasmunds Rye White Dog as the base for my whale puke tincture which should be done in about 2 weeks. I'm really looking forward to seeing how it turns out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Them sophistimicated city folk used to call it ambergris or sometin real suave like that. :twitchsmile:

 

Has anyone tried oak chips or oak dust on this unaged whisky stuff?

Edited by baubel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, as a hand-crafted artist distilled spirit, this doesn't seem high to me. We pay more than this for most of our absinthe. (And more than this for an average bad date). I was up at DP when she was making this stuff, and man, it's amazing the care and detail Cheryl puts into everything she does. I consider it a premium to support a lone-wolf creator of great things. A few extra bucks is needed to keep people like this solvent and comfortable enough to continue exploring their passions.

 

That being said, CRAP!!! That's a lot of $$$!!!!! (Just kidding) :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Has anyone tried oak chips or oak dust on this unaged whisky stuff?
Are you sure you don't want to come up a couple of days early? ;)

 

(And more than this for an average bad date).
I don't know who you had fixin' you up but I expected more for less in my bad dates! Damn, did that come out right? :g:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe, I wanted to, but there were no flights going up there on the 23rd or earlier that worked with my very special lady's schedule. Sounds like you're planning something kinky though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I consider it a premium to support a lone-wolf creator of great things. A few extra bucks is needed to keep people like this solvent and comfortable enough to continue exploring their passions.

 

Agreed. Think of it as a donation to DP that gets you a bottle of premium booze in return.

 

Here's what I'm sipping on at the moment. The result of an evening's worth of experimentation.

 

WINTER SAZERAC

 

1.5 oz. DP Rye Dog

.5 oz. pear eau-de-vie (I used Clear Creek pear brandy)

1 teaspoon rich (2:1) simple syrup

3-4 dashes Bitter Truth Jerry Thomas' Own Decanter bitters

.25 teaspoon blanche absinthe (I used Clandestine)

 

Prepare in the traditional fashion: rinse a chilled cocktail glass (I like a small stemmed goblet for this one) with the blanche absinthe. Do NOT discard the excess. Stir the other ingredients together with ice and strain into prepared glass. Twist a lemon peel over the drink and discard peel.

 

It's nice! The pale color and notes of bread, pear, allspice, clove, anise, and lemon put me in a wintry frame of mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For what it's worth, as a hand-crafted artist distilled spirit, this doesn't seem high to me. We pay more than this for most of our absinthe.

I suppose what surprised me most is that Cheryl's absinthe (and Walton Waters happens to still be my absolute favorite absinthe, incidentally) is only about $6 more, and more experienced folks here at the forum have always explained that absinthe is generally more expensive than other liquors because of the herb bill. When I saw that the price for this rye whiskey was nearly as high as the absinthe, I had to do a double-take and wonder why.

 

None of this is a criticism. All distillers are free to determine what they feel is an appropriate price for everything they distill, and posting subjective opinions about what we think of it is always a tightrope walk, because you don't want to hurt feelings, but you also don't want to be so subjective toward folks that you might know in Real Life as to compromise an honest opinion. So I'm going to honestly say that $66 for a hand-crafted artist distilled unaged rye is too high for me personally considering other options, but that assessment is due more to limitations of my bank account.

 

Thanks to AiO for the in-depth review and recipe recommendations. :cheers: I can speak to the tastiness of both the Clear Creek pear brandy and the La Clandestine, so I'm sure that Winter Sazerac is exceptional!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
... and more experienced folks here at the forum have always explained that absinthe is generally more expensive than other liquors because of the herb bill. When I saw that the price for this rye whiskey was nearly as high as the absinthe, I had to do a double-take and wonder why.

Lots of variables. I don't claim to know anything about Cheryl's process, but for all we know she's going all the way from raw materials, mashing, fermenting, etc., which consumes time, space, and energy before anything even goes into the still (and pardon if my beer brewing vocabulary isn't appropriate for a distillery). I don't think we can just look at the cost of the herb bill and say that anything with presumably cheaper ingredients should be less costly to produce, especially at the scale of an artisan distillery. Just too much unknown.

 

I think most of the point around the relatively high cost of absinthe and the cost of herbs is just that if you want a high quality, distilled, naturally colored, etc. absinthe, that can't be done on the cheap. There's sort of a "lower bound" on the cost of good absinthe. But I never really got from those conversations that it was about cost of absinthe vs. cost of other booze. That may have been discussed, it just wasn't the point that I took from it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But I never really got from those conversations that it was about cost of absinthe vs. cost of other booze. That may have been discussed, it just wasn't the point that I took from it.

Hmm, that's a thought-provoking take on it. Thanks for the insight, Brian, because I actually had taken it the other way, but perhaps I had the wrong impression of it.

 

Specifically, one post from a year or so ago from a newer member sticks out in my mind, in which he basically said, "why is absinthe so expensive?", and a reply from someone much more experienced basically stated, "you should ask how is it so (relatively) cheap", and outlined all the expenses associated with absinthe that weren't a factor in other liquors. Perhaps it's more of a case-by-case basis than at first seems apparent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
a premium to support a lone-wolf creator

Yes, we all should try to support our WS members.

 

Cheryl had a loving pet a few short years ago named Wolfie*. Sadly, he isn't with her anymore. Ah, the stories. :cheers:

 

 

 

 

 

*I hope I got that correct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure why that would be, since some of them are upwards of 130 proof or 65% alcohol--absinthe territory. Even the lower proof white dogs shouldn't oxidize any more rapidly than barrel-aged whiskey with the same alcohol content.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×