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Tweakin

What do you guys think?

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Thanks Density. I plan on branching out after getting familiar with good Absinthe.

 

sbmac, I plan on trying more variety after a few bottles of the Verte. I am going on my limited information that a blanche is to Absinthe as a verte is. Thanks for the recommendation.

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Verte means the absinthe is green receiving its color from an extra maceration of herbs after the distillation process. (some clame to be a verte but use food coloring instead to color it. I refer to those as fakesinthes) Vertes tend to have more complex flavor profiles and herbal qualities due to the extra maceration.

 

Blanches are clear and are lighter/sweeter in flavor due to the lack of the extra maceration of herbs. (a cool note is that blanches came to popularity when absinthe was banned. It was the moonshine of absinthe. However, unlike moonshine, blanches are equally high in quality as vertes are. Where as moonshine is awful compared to a nice barrel aged whiskey.)

 

sbmac is very right about you needing to try both a blanche and a verte. They are very distinctively different and you may like one style more than the other so you should try both sometime down the road.

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Not denying that Just saying it has a popular reputation for being the moonshine (clandestine) being that most people who were producing illegal absinthe did not make it a verte.

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That is the story. Swiss moonshiners apparently didn't color their hooch so it would be less obviously absinthe. Was it legal to make raki or arak without a distiller's permit?

Vertes tend to have more complex flavor profiles and herbal qualities due to the extra maceration.

Blanches are clear and are lighter/sweeter in flavor due to the lack of the extra maceration of herbs.

Mostly, true. There is no question that the coloring step adds another level of flavor (and complexity) to vertes that's obviously missing from blanches. However, there are some very complex blanches, too. Kübler is simple but Blanchette is pretty complex. I have had some pretty simple vertes and some very complex blanches. Point being, the coloring steps does add to the flavor and complexity but is far from the sole determining factor. :cheers:

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They also tend to just have some different flavors in them. The three primary coloring herbs (lemon balm, petite wormwood and hyssop) are not typically used for anything but the coloration step. They may add complexity, but also simply add other and different flavors to them. You may like what they add, you may not. Me, I'm learning to like lemon balm more, but still could do without most of the time. But as said before, absinthe may be quite complex without the addition of the green stuff.

 

I've not tried the Duplais blanche, but I can say you wont go wrong with a bottle of La Clandestine, either. Both are offered from DUNY at about the same price.

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I had Clandestine a long time ago as one of my first absinthes. It was too sweet/floral/honeyed for me. Made me gag a bit, but then again, Scotch use to make me cringe so maybe its time to revisit some blanches.

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wow, ya'll get carded by the UPS man?? Mine said contains alcohol on the side, and I went to pick it up at the post office. Theres a huge sign that says "Must see id when picking up ANY package" but the man didnt even ask.

 

WHAT IF I WAS REALLY 10 AND JUST LOOKED 24???

 

hahahaha!!!

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I would think in that case the postal worker would get in trouble, and you would be a drunk 10 year old. Outside of that, you shouldn't worry about it! Orders from DUNY did not always have the alcohol and ID notes on the box.

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Joe, I did put a 'typical' in there. I didn't know that they were used by some unnamed distilleries, but I'm not at all surprised. Some people are weird like that. I don't know what parts of melissa and pontica come across in distillation, but I'm sure it's appreciably different tasting from the macerate nonetheless.

Edited by density

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That is the story. Swiss moonshiners apparently didn't color their hooch so it would be less obviously absinthe.

And soon it was nicknamed "la bleue." Although the very first extraits d'absinthe Suisse aka cremes d'absinthe aka liqueurs d'absinthe were preferred to be verte by the clientele. Around 1900, each year Neuchatel alone was making one million litres of the booze. However, les bleues from 1950-1970 tend to be more in the vein of the current les bleues than blanches sold in the years 1800-1885, for example.

 

The Swiss blanches of the heyday, according to Favre, or Lebeuf, contained more alcohol by volume, green anise instead badiane (which was a complementary ingredient) and relied on several varieties of Artemisia. Les bleues, on the other hand, incorporated more badiane into the recipes and lowered the alcohol significantly. Just in 1931, Charles W. J. Brasher in "Absinthe addiction and cocktail habit" (British Journal of Inebriety, Vol. 29, Issue 1, pages 4–12, July 1931) mentions, not for the very first time, that absinthe made in Switzerland was much stronger (up to 80%) than its French equivalent. And obviously, they were much more complex concoctions than nowadays.

 

The shift of colouring herbs into the distillation is nihil novi, regarding such a grand blanche like Berger that has been discovered recently and is a true pinnacle of blanche complexity.

 

Thus, we can create a visible timeline:

 

1) 1800-1855

Swiss blanches of the heyday

concurrently with

vertes of the heyday (as the more preferred type of a tipple-even Virey mentions it as early as 1816)

 

2) 1910-1950

les bleues of post-ban period

 

3) 1950-1970/80

modern les bleues

 

4) nowadays

French style blanches of nowadays

vertes (Swiss and French style) of nowadays.

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Oh, I'm not worried. The only time I get carded is the liquor store and strip club. But I think thats just to avoid fines. UPS, post office, smoke shops, head shops, bars... In these parts we work on the trust system.

 

Did Joe just say half dozen? Jules picked a good one!!! ;)

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At least I'm consistent. :wave2:

I'll have a drink on babuel any day!

Someday I'll manage to have a drink on Absomphe too.

Come on over m.a. We can enjoy a beverage or two by the fire.

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I got a 100ml bottle of Grande Absente for about $11. It was worth trying at that price and was not that bad....it was just pushing the limits of mintyness..

The big problem is that just like Lucid, it is in the same price range as far better choices.

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I got a 100ml bottle of Grande Absente for about $11.

 

Someone actually paid you $11 to take a sample off their hands?

 

Man, I wish I could get deals like that! :laugh: ;)

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