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Brynjolfr

Absinthe Fleur d'Absinthe

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Got a newsletter from RueVerte.com today. In it, Antoine mentions a new product called "Absinthe Fleur d'Absinthe". The wormwood sprig looks discouraging; it reminds me of Reality Absinth and its hyssop sprig. Not to mention that it probably makes it overly bitter. Has anyone here tried it?

 

 

Link: http://www.rueverte.com/product_info.php?products_id=712

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It doesn't. I was surprised positively myself.

 

There is a certain characteristics of Artemisia absinthium from Fougerolles. Young, fresh from harvest it smells of parsley and is very lightly bitter. The dried one moves the amount of bitterness from the leaves to the flowers, which is quite uncommon amongst the wormwood varietals.

 

Fleur d'absinthe is very nice and very palatable, I believe they put the young sprigs in absinthe what might explain the smoothness on the palate. Absinthe itself is that delicate that incorporating it in cocktail, what was suggested on a leaflet, is completely off. 1:3 is the best ratio and the amount of fennel is very prevalent what makes the absinthe be quite nice since the lift of fenchone limits in France.

 

A fully-fledged regular absinthe from France, not the greatest quality but really pleasant.

 

Reality has had the herbs in the alcohol for the long. If you look at the colour of Fleur, for some, it is really undercoloured, hence no stronger influence from the wormwood. IF they had put wormwood from here or Italy, it would have turned vile, indeed.

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Perhaps you are right Boggy but looking at the photo, if that really is a Grand Wormwood sprig, it is going to be bitter as hell. I haven't tried it so I freely admit to speculating.

 

The comment (other than yours, Boggy) doesn't sell me, either:

This is my favorite Absinthe. I don't care that the veggies aren't distilled and imparts different tastes, its still my favorite. I usually order three bottles at a time, but this order I did two so I could try some different ones but I always come back to my Absinthium 1792.
Tilt. :twitchsmile:

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I would not say it to be considered a favourite, too.

 

A friend of mine, living really close to Fougerolles, has got the bottle and poured me sample. In terms of colouration, the wormwood has yielded very little, it is as faint green as the recent Montmartre. That might explain that wormwood is decorative, probably very young what I have experienced with the plant itself, and once purchased it can be removed.

 

Comparing Emile Coulin (which is said to be coloured or flavoured with wormwood macerate), Fleur is quite smooth. I will have to ask the friend how big the wormwood sprig was in the bottle, it is obvious they won't get the consistency in that matter.

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Is it supposed to be a verte or a blanche?

I believe "rust" is the word you were looking for. Or filthy. Count me in the not-buying lot.

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Young, fresh from harvest it smells of parsley and is very lightly bitter. The dried one moves the amount of bitterness from the leaves to the flowers, which is quite uncommon amongst the wormwood varietals.

No way, Dude. Take a look at that picture again. There is nothing young about that Wormwood stem. It's sporting serious bitter-ass flowers.

 

"...dried one moves the amount of bitterness from the leaves to the flowers..." Huh? I don't think I buy that. Maybe I'm misunderstanding you? Wormwood is b-i-t-t-e-r, baby: Stems, twigs, leaves, flowers, seeds and the very breath it exhales.

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"...dried one moves the amount of bitterness from the leaves to the flowers..." Huh? I don't think I buy that. Maybe I'm misunderstanding you? Wormwood is b-i-t-t-e-r, baby: Stems, twigs, leaves, flowers, seeds and the very breath it exhales.

So, I will explain that again. I have been given a sample of that absinthe as well as the bag of 1 week old wormwood from Fougerolles harvested in the same place the distillery harvests.

 

While stripping, I have found some really young, not dried yet, leaves have that uncommon characteristics, i.e. they are not as bitter as they should. Moreover, the flowers are more bitter than leaves (both dried) and wormwood from Fougerolles is to be considered a very specific variety of the plant. These are just observations regarding that particular plant.

 

As regards Polish wormwood, American wormwood (Boston, Everett, Virginia, etc), Italian wormwood and even the Pontarlier wormwood, I completely agree with your last statement if every wormwood has its peculiar characteristics what makes it stand out as a variety. And what comes off in the distillate.

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