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Jack Griffin

Topettes

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Even if it isn't a dead rat.......I can appreciate not opening the thing. It may be the one, you know, the perfect one. Unique. It's good to keep it wrapped up to preserve the thing. I'd put it in the bank with the balance of my coin collection. I don't look at them much either. Cheers!

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I appreciate you guys getting my perspective... for some reason beyond my understanding, this stuff matters a lot to me.

 

BTW, Joe, you were right...there was a dead rat in there, but it was INSIDE the topette...this makes it even MORE rare!

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Here's a pretty rare sight; a topette in its original 19th century wrapping paper and binding straw.

Three sets of 2 recently became available, which were found in their original box in an attic in France!

This little 3-dose topette will never be seen, as it would be a crime to remove the wrapping...the mystery!

 

A Lionel train collector found a pre-WWII Electromagnetic Crane still sealed in the box, he had it x-rayed to prove the box held it's contents.

It's reportedly changed hands among some high rolling collectors, still un-opened.

 

 

An un-named Herbsaint collector has a number of still sealed in the box, vintage Herbsaint glasses and drippers, the rumor that he sleeps next to boxes has yet to be confirmed.

boxeddripglass.jpg

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I thought most glasses being repros, the dose would be the same. But that is a swag.

 

Sorry about the acronym to the member formerly known as OMG_Bill. :)

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I don't know about back then but tonight's doses of absinthe, circa 1910, will be about 30ml.......each.

 

'Tis a shame I'll be drinking alone. *smile*

 

New year welcoming is a once a year treat. May as well make it a nice treat. Cheers!

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A never-opened topette in its original wrapping paper is like a good marriage between a blind wife and a deaf husband.

 

- mgs

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I can appreciate not opening the thing. It may be the one, you know, the perfect one.

For me, I like the idea of keeping it wrapped not because it holds the allure of possibly being the most pristine topette (as Scott pointed out, fine examples of 3-dose topettes like this aren't very rare), but because this one little object preserves a specific moment in time laden with cultural details (from the type of paper used, the manner in which it was tied, the idea that straw was used instead of string, which itself leads to interesting questions about when certain practices came into being, etc.).

 

Ultimately, yes, it's just paper and straw, but archaeologists are ecstatic to find exactly this sort of preserved object in their work, and given that I'm aware of only a small handful of these being known to exist in this state, I'm all for keeping it intact. Good on you Scott for not giving into the temptation!

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One of the things that I love about antiques is the human story, which is often a mystery. Who used them?

what were their stories? There is a tactile romantic vibe that these pieces offer to us. I find it

centering and relaxing... kind of romantic. Where I live, anything that can help put on the brakes and slow down time is welcomed. When I see this wrapped topette, I think of the glassblower carefully wrapping and boxing it for delivery; part of the process and story. I often call these antiques "time machines" for this reason, as they evoke an awareness of the past very strongly in me.

 

Perhaps I'm a romantic, escapist, a bit crazy... Midnight in Paris nailed it.

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Where I live, anything that can help put on the brakes and slow down time is welcomed.

 

Funny, I can remember quite a few really laid back afternoons spent at The Mystic Warrior/Goddess, and Canterbury Ales at the turn of the millennium.

 

Then again, those folks are all romantics like us, aren't they? :)

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Ultimately, yes, it's just paper and straw, but archaeologists are ecstatic to find exactly this sort of preserved object in their work, and given that I'm aware of only a small handful of these being known to exist in this state, I'm all for keeping it intact.

Like this?

 

 

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As a former archaeologist I say keep it intact. It's a rare treasure. And to me, the wrapping itself is beautiful.

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Like this?

That's a great photo, Bill - thanks for uploading it. I haven't seen that one before. Was this a bottle found in its original packing material? I'm curious if that kind of straw wrapper was used in every case or crate of absinthe being shipped out of the factory, or perhaps just for the ones being shipped overseas.

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As a former archaeologist I say keep it intact. It's a rare treasure. And to me, the wrapping itself is beautiful.

 

What New Hampshiana Jones said.

Edited by Absomphe

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As a former archaeologist I say keep it intact. It's a rare treasure. And to me, the wrapping itself is beautiful.

 

What New Hampshiana Jones said.

 

(As a matter of fact, for my Ancient Civ lessons I sometimes do a character called New Hampshire Jones... better known as "Hampy.")

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Thank you Scott. :)

 

Just a little something I found while cleaning the closet looking for booze. <shrug>

 

Funny how things get forgotten while I run amok with casual $$$.

 

That shit doesn't exist anymore though.

Sigh!

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Sure come on by. If we aren't home, the key is under the frog. ;)

 

The fountains are in the den on the shelf.

 

Ice is in the fridge.

 

Glasses are near the ice, near the fountains and on my desk.

 

You are quite welcome.

 

:cheers:

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Agreed with all above. I've stopped collecting topettes, I already have a shelf full of them. Granted, I love the little things, but most of them are far too common (and even then, the most uncommon topettes I have ever found I sent them to two of the people answering this thread)

 

But an absinthe related item in its original wrapper ? Well still wouldn't buy it (it's my credo for canes and absinthe antiques : if you can't use it, you don't buy it). But it's quite the rare sight, and a treasure. Would lose all value (and not only market value), all meaning if unwrapped. It's a real testimony of times passed.

 

Fine fine example of a true Gent

I have a friend like that in Geneva. We went with another friend to see him, since he organized an absinthe related get-together at his office. He let us sleep at his office, and when leaving us for the night, his last words were

By all means, don't stop drinking while I'm gone, you know where the cabinet is. I want a detailed review of everything you have not tasted yet by tomorrow

 

But back on the topic of topettes.

Of all the ones I have, my prefered one is this one, for its very unusual shape

img-4.jpg

(have to take a better picture)

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