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Jack Griffin

Topettes

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I was thinking of you today Jay...my whole folks are visiting my sister in Portland, and I couldn't go! Next June or July is looking good however. Perhaps we can have a drink or two and break out that topette!

 

Scott, the summer heat in July is a wonderful month for absinthe and it's accoutrements! :cheers:

 

And Garrett, thanks for the kind words. My girlfriend is a biologist, and she likes how that particular topette is reminiscent of a lab flask. Those science girls make great absinthe enthusiasts, ha.

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The Tempus Fugit Cordon glasses almost seem like double dose vessels. They are certainly full sized.

 

I rarely use mine....much to big for my drinks. ;)

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Nope, I don't have much of an absinthiana collection these days.

 

I knew you were using those hefty beer steins for absinthe. :laugh:

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Scratch that emoticon, BAUB!

 

I've been using the circa 1860 tri-panel, intaglio carved, two pound red Bohemian duck, stag, and elk scene beer glass for practically every thing I imbibe these days. Its magnificence was enhanced by the fifty dollar price that I bargained a dealer down to, at a local antique tractor show.

 

Yeah, I can be a real :pirate: when I love an object enough. :laugh:

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My new topettes (nothing fancy, but they do the job) and now I just need to find one as big as Scott's... :twitchsmile: I also would like some with stoppers and not just corks, but I suppose these will work until that day comes though.........

 

topettes.jpg

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Marc has a couple on the musee boutique with the correct blown glass bouchons (stoppers).

They aren't that much money either. You could probably sell two of yours on Ebay to pay for one perfect topette with a nice bouchon! BTW, a paisley manatee has the twin to that giant topette. Frankly, the doses are too big to really use, it's just cool! Best of luck on your collecting journey!

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Here's a pretty rare sight; a topette in its original 19th century wrapping paper and binding straw.

Three sets of 2 recently became available, which were found in their original box in an attic in France!

This little 3-dose topette will never be seen, as it would be a crime to remove the wrapping...the mystery!

 

wrappedtopettelowres.jpg

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This little 3-dose topette will never be seen

That's a shame. You have a very nice picture of the wrapper and like a bottle of absinthe, it's what's inside that matters. Just sayin'

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This little 3-dose topette will never be seen

That's a shame. You have a very nice picture of the wrapper and like a bottle of absinthe, it's what's inside that matters. Just sayin'

Antiques don't play by normal rules. Same would go for toys, or comic books, being worth more in the wrapper.

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This little 3-dose topette will never be seen

That's a shame. You have a very nice picture of the wrapper and like a bottle of absinthe, it's what's inside that matters. Just sayin'

Antiques don't play by normal rules. Same would go for toys, or comic books, being worth more in the wrapper.

But for people who collect for the idea of using them, instead of increasing the value of a collection, the value of something in its original packaging wouldn't matter.

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It has nothing to do about increasing the value of a collection; it's about honoring the history of the pieces, and preserving and respecting them.

 

3-dose clear topettes are fairly common antiques, and having a few pristine examples in the world of how they were packaged using paper and straw, from the glass-blowers' shop, is an important historical point. As a reference and educational tool, it is much more valuable to people unopened.

 

I do understand however, that it was also meant to be seen and used! It does bug me knowing that little gem is hiding in there!

 

A case in point for leaving it wrapped, for the same reasons, would be the very rare cone-shaped sugar loaf (pain de sucre) still in its wrapper. I took this shot in the museum in Pontarlier.

 

 

sugar.jpg

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Did you teach HS English? :laugh:

 

Antique buyers are even nuttier, having to be part detectives, philanthropists, amateurs (in the passion sense), archelogists, and negociators. But they do a great job at preserving history. Ralph Lauren being a good example.

Edited by Miguel

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Did you teach HS English? :laugh:

No, but I guaran-damn-tee you I could teach many high school English teachers a thing or two about their speaking alleged language. B) :laugh:

Edited by Absomphe

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3-dose clear topettes are fairly common antiques, and having a few pristine examples in the world of how they were packaged using paper and straw, from the glass-blowers' shop, is an important historical point. As a reference and educational tool, it is much more valuable to people unopened.

 

I completely agree

 

Thanks for sharing the pic and don't ever unwrap it! The world has plenty of opened 3 dose topettes.

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