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gfpoet

What happened?

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Hey guys,

 

What ever happened to the Belle Amie Absinthe?

 

I have some left, but is it made under another name?

 

Any info would be great.

 

Thanks,

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And since it's VdA that has Belle Amie currently, I don't think the LDF shipping deal applies in this situation. Not to nitpick, just sayin'.

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What ever happened to the Belle Amie Absinthe?

 

Compliquée l'histoire de la Belle Amie, on écrira un livre il y aurait matière

"A complex story, the Belle Amie has, we should write a book, there is enough to be told about"

 

Well, anyway, they now have a new "Distiller Proof" for a new Belle Amie. Surprisingly so, it does not taste the same anymore. But the new formula they have... Well, that rocks.

 

Herbal, sharp and fresh, from my memories. Will have to buy one of these bottles

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What ever happened to the Belle Amie Absinthe?

But the new formula they have... Well, that rocks.

 

 

Thanx ;)

It's not a new formula (some changes in the distillation process only) but still the same old recipe used in Belle Amie 1 and 2 ;)

Edited by Heure Verte

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Hehe, I remember terminology causing some confusion in the past in regards to BA vs BA2.

 

So, the ingredients are the same BUT the distillation protocol has been modified for BA3, just as the protocol between BA1 and BA2 was different.

 

If the ingredients have been the same through all 3 batches, then they could all be considered to be a Nimes style absinthe. Is this correct?

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As far as how the taste goes, definitely. But I mean if you took the BA herb bill and compared it to a reliable source for the Nimes herb bill, like the one in Duplais...

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If the ingredients have been the same through all 3 batches, then they could all be considered to be a Nimes style absinthe. Is this correct?

 

you won't get that from me ;)

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compared it to a reliable source for the Nimes herb bill, like the one in Duplais...

 

Is it reliable? What evidence do you have that it's reliable? Do you have a brand that was produced in Nimes during the day? If so, how do you know that that particular brand was indicative of the brands produced in that area? How do you know that that one brand isn't an outlier? How many brands were produced in Nimes during the day? Why would you think that they all tried to create the same thing? If you have a brand that was made in Nimes during the day, do you have a GC/MS analysis of its composition indicating that it even comes close to the ingredients listed in Duplais? Are there other sources (that don't simply copy Duplais) describing the ingredients/herb bill of absinthe produced specifically in Nimes for the populace of the region?

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Maybe I'm mistaken, but I've always been under the impression that the classifications mentioned in Duplais were very broad generalizations and weren't normally used in day to day conversation.

 

Regarding your question about whether it is 'reliable', I don't have much evidence myself, but I'd defer to someone who knows a heck of a lot more about absinthe than I do, who states:

Pierre Duplais' seminal Traité de la Fabrication des Liqueurs et de la Distillation

des Alcools is the authoritative French distillation guide. It went through seven

editions from 1855 to 1900 and is the basis of our understanding of 19th century

French distillation techniques. It's arguably the most important book on distillation

written in any language in the 19th century, and no comparable book of the same

scope has been published since..

 

The special section on absinthe is of particular importance - this is our

most accurate and comprehensive guide to the recipes and techniques used

by late 19th century absinthe distillers, and is informally regarded as the

"bible" of those seeking to duplicate their recipes today. Almost all other

published 19th century absinthe recipes - including those in the Bedel, de

Brevans and Roret guides - are simply paraphrases of the recipes in Duplais

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Indeed Brian. It was my understanding (after speaking with another well recognized absinthe expert) that Duplais was a spirits industry insider, and was familiar with the herb bills of many major absinthe producers.

 

But of course it would be a bad idea (loss of trust and maybe legal trouble) to list the names of the marques along with their formulas right there in print, so he named the recipes after the regions where the representative producers were based (and if I'm not mistaken, absinthe isn't the only French culinary entity to have those kind of region-based styles). It is also my understanding that the recipes were adapted for small scale/home use, as opposed to the huge scale that the big marques operated on.

------------

 

And when I said "reliable", I just meant "the most credible we have to go on", as compared to, say, a recipe Boggie found on the back of a preban cereal box.

 

Another basis for comparison (since we're now playing what's-in-a-name) is when a non-CO is created that generally follows a Duplais herb bill, it's sometimes named as such. To give a fictitious example so we don't dwell too long in HGland- "New Hampshire Nimes".

-----------

 

I thought Cheryl was maybe just being facetious anyway.

 

But hell, I was simply trying to help clarify a communications issue that comes up every time a new BA is discussed, since it seems there's always confusion about how the term "recipe" is used, as opposed to things like "herb bill" or "distillation protocol".

Edited by Green Baron

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You can make a BA last as long as it takes for the cops to come and make you pull your pants back up. :bguitar:

Edited by Green Baron

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Certainly the Duplais manual was in print for a long time, and was widely copied and imitated/paraphrased. Presumably it was widely read, but does anyone know the size of the editions?

 

I almost became an archeologist on college. (Probably should have.) One of the academic "battles" was between the dirt diggers (archeologists) and the book readers (historians). Each thought their view of the world was more correct. They were in fact complimentary (obviously).

 

With absinthe, there's this one book, Duplais. There's probably some others but it's a slim amount of information. And we don't know how accurate it is based on other sources of information to corroborate it, especially with respect to recipes and protocols. And I don't think any existing French or Swiss producers are doing to say whether the methods described are or are not accurate or to what degree. And we don't have any old bottles of the cheap or even average absinthe of the day.

 

Even a lot of relatively recent history (say US 19th century) has lots of books written from that era. And while generally accurate, archaeologists have found out a lot about how people lived that you couldn't learn from old books because it wasn't written about. Maybe it was just too mundane.

 

A lot of old books are interesting to read. But I'm also interested in seeing hard science backing things up. And if there really were regional absinthe styles, we should be able to find newspaper articles defending one style over another, and perhaps other references. Perhaps someone whose done this kind of research will share that information and we'll all learn together.

 

jmo.

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And if there really were regional absinthe styles,

That's been my point from the beginning. The regional 'styles' mentioned in Duplais might have even been of his own making. Even if they were true categories, there doesn't exist much evidence that the terms were used on a regular basis, or in marketing or branding.

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A lot of old books are interesting to read. But I'm also interested in seeing hard science backing things up.

I agree with this.

 

Books are subject to interpretation. It could be as Cheryl put it

Maybe it was just too mundane
.

Sounds good to me. Let the books get you started and tweak as you see fit. I made beer from a kit once or twice and there were slight differences in the outcome. Could have cooked too long or had a pinch more hops in one. Same label, same type bottles, approximately the same fermentation temps and so forth. Just sliiiiightly different product.

 

jmo

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Maybe I'm mistaken, but I've always been under the impression that the classifications mentioned in Duplais were very broad generalizations and weren't normally used in day to day conversation.

 

True but is it not 100% accurate that all absinthe made in lyon have angelica in maceration and speedwell in coloration most of the producer wanted to copy pernod or make better stuff than pernod

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Duplais' wonderful book is a thing of beauty.

Between the French-to-English and 19th-to-21st century translations, misinterpretations abound. There are a couple of recipes that make absolutely no sense, the quantities of herbs to spirits are ludicrous. That said, it is a delightful guide and has secrets hidden in its passages for the careful reader.

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True but is it not 100% accurate that all absinthe made in lyon have angelica in maceration and speedwell in coloration

Which is why it's called a broad generalization. ;)

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the funny thing with absinthe was that there was 25 distilleries in Pontarlier (back in the hey day) all able to earn a living even more for an 10000 hab town ... I was thinking If i were living there back in 1900's witch brand would I drink it most of the disitilleries even sell 3-4 brand ...

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