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Gwydion Stone

Swiss IGP for exclusive use of the word "Absinthe"

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Hi Markus, I e-mailed you a week or so ago about this, and wanted you to know that I consider the

absinthe coming out of Matter the best Switzerland has to offer. I've learned much about this since last week, and wish you and Oliver the best. Rest assured, I will always be ordering Duplais absinthes!

 

-Scott

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Just to add my two cents worth into this discussion, I think it's absolutely preposterous for the VdT to try and put a ban on the use of French phrases!!! Needless to say I don't think my husband and myself shall ever be spending money on absinthes made by these particular producers. Especially considering there are plenty of superb offerings made by distillers outside this region that we would happily buy, even if they had to be labeled "wormwood cordials" for legal purposes . I only wish we had the extra cash on hand to put towards the legal fund, even though the deadline is looming. I'll be most interested to find out the outcome of this situation. Thank you for bringing it to our attention.

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Cheers and respect to those doing what they can to fight this, and to those who are taking their time to translate what's going on--literally and figuratively--for folks like me!

 

I'm glad I am not yearning for any VdT marques, though I haven't had the one made with tansy yet. :devil:

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Alan isn't mute about the topic because he has to, it's just that the guys from the Val are sick of the flamewar, it seems. They have a very different approach of absinthe, you know, for them it's more than a beverage, it's part of their roots.

 

Long story short : there's gonna be a new law passing soon in Switzerland which would generalize the principle of "cassis de dijon", or so I've heard from Claude Alain Bugnon, and they want to protecte their market against Tzechsinthe.

 

Apparently, they think that there is no actual "automatic" protection of a product on a larger scale if it's protected in switzerland (I'm not taking any position here, just relating hearsays)

 

Besides, apparently IGP has exceptions, and you can include these exceptions in the protection, or you can even extend an IGP, and the guys from the Val, even drunk as hell, feel that Pontarlier, sharing the same soil and the same natural conditions, should be covered by the IGP too.

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SHOULD be, but isn't at the present time. Correct?

 

With regards to exceptions, what would be criteria for the exception be? Because at this point, there seems like there would have to be a LOT of exceptions.

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Moreso because in France you can't call a product "Absinthe", but yeah, not at the present time.

 

And as far as exceptions are talked about, it's still a broad idea in the conversations I had.

Claude Alain isn't the most "belligerent" out there, that being said.

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But wouldn't it be a dangerous thing to have the 'broad idea' IGP approved before all of the reprocussions are dealt with? It seems to me that a smarter thing would be to come up with some form of protection that doesn't alienate the rest of the traditional absinthe producing world.

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Don't ask me, I only talked with the guy for an afternoon, I am not Swiss, and don't know shit about european commercial right.

 

A penny for Oxy's thougts though, he's been talking with Bugnon for quite a time on Friday, and the debate was heated while friendly (and I have just the photo to illustrate that)

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... the guys from the Val, even drunk as hell, feel that Pontarlier, sharing the same soil and the same natural conditions, should be covered by the IGP too.

How about Spain, Egypt, Israel, China, Bulgaria and Poland? Because I believe that's the soil that grows a lot of their botanicals; unless someone can point me to where all the anise and fennel fields are in the VdT.

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Ha!

 

I don't see this issue as a "flamewar", since it doesn't really involve online personas bashing each other; it's more like universal condemnation. I know what you were trying to say, it's probably just semantics, but still.

 

In addition to anise and fennel not originating from VdT, it's well known (and now relatively easy to experience first hand that absinthes that use absinthium from Washington, Montana, and Virginia in the US easily compare to the best brands that source their absinthium from either VdT or Pontarlier. Those are just a few examples that are easy to come by, and I'm not even going to speculate on how many other regions in the world are suitable for growing absinthium.

 

Think about coffee. Coffee originated in the Africa/Arabia region. Yet coffee from Latin America and Asia/Pacific is just as valid and can obtained at equal quality. True, coffee from various regions has different flavor characteristics, but that's part of the very concept of terrior.

 

So that pretty much debunks that idea for the whole trinity.

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unless someone can point me to where all the anise and fennel fields are in the VdT.

That's actually why they had to settle for just the PGI. They would have preferred the PDO, but not all of the ingredients are from the region.

 

 

I know Aggelos was assured that there is not automatic application of a Swiss PGI outside of Switzerland, it's just that everyone outside of the VdT disagrees. It's all just too damning. The exclusion of Oliver, who they consider insignificant, also proves that this is just money, and not quality guarantees. The protection against Czechsinthe could have also been averted by just a general Swiss PGI for the drink, but they sought to exclude as many producers as possible. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying directly to your face.

 

But I'm glad the Fete was fun. I hear CAB played the tuba in the band again this year.

 

Alan posting in this thread would serve no purpose, since he would only be voicing the same VdT arguments that Aggelos (and all of us previously) have mentioned. He would only just get the e-crap beat out of him. Who would sign on for something like that?!

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Alan posting in this thread would serve no purpose,

Agreed. Alan is not the one that makes policy and probably had little input on this whole mess. He tries to sell the beverages that someone else makes and to my understanding, that's about it. Bashing Alan would be "shooting the messenger." I suspect Alan and Bugnon have shared in depth conversations, in particular over how Alan would deal with the fallout. I'm sure Kübler didn't give a rat's ass about Alan's opinion.*

 

 

 

 

*All of this is 100% speculation on my part. I don't know shit and freely admit it.

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The passion and pride the people of the Val de Travers have for absinthe is undeniable (I understand so much more having been there), but I still don't think they should go ahead with this.

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Edited with Google translation: Pernod guards his green fairy

Story

 

A region of Switzerland wants to reserve the exclusive designation "absinthe". The French-cons attack.

 

React

 

By YANN PHILIPPINES

 

The cradle of the "green fairy" is nestled on the wooded foothills of the Jura between Pontarlier (Doubs) and the quiet area of the Swiss Val de Travers. But since the Helvetii have launched a takeover bid for the absinthe, the "crazy drink that" inflames the spirits. On March 31, producers of the Val-de-Travers were obtained from the Federal Office of Swiss agriculture (BLW) a protected geographical indication on the mythical drink and his nickname, "the green fairy" and "blue" . If there is no dispute by June 30, they will be the only ones authorized to sell absinthe, first in Switzerland and in Europe.

 

Sip. French side, it does not digest this attempt to swallow a monument of national heritage, ancestor of pastis. "Their ultimate goal is to pique our name globally. We must defend ourselves, indignant Cesar Giron, CEO of Pernod, the historic leader, before the prohibition of 1915, and now claims 25% of the global market. "We will file an appeal in the coming days with the FOA, tells Liberation Mary Benech, Director General of the Federation of French spirits. Absinthe is a generic term. It is as if the wanted exclusivity Martinique rum! We can not let this go, it's a matter of principle. "

 

It is also a question of money. Since the lifting of the ban in the 2000s, sales explode: 25% per year between 2004 and 2009. The market is small (3.2 million bottles last year, half the U.S.) but very profitable. For the green fairy seduces connected metropolises Anglo-Saxon, ready to pay 50 euros a bottle for a sip of forbidden afford and enjoy the traditional ritual of absinthe is diluted by gently flowing water through a sugar cube placed on a perforated spoon.

 

The Swiss can really grab the setting? Historically, no one disputes that the recipe for absinthe was born in Val-de-Travers in the late eighteenth century. The first distillery was founded in 1797 by Daniel Henry Dubied and his step-son, Henri-Louis Pernod. But it crossed the border in 1805 to evade taxes, and based Pernod Fils Pontarlier. The green fairy is quickly the fortunes of the city, where it concentrates the bulk of production, with more than 3000 jobs. And in France, in the cafes of Montmartre, that absinthe is the drink emblematic of the Belle Epoque. With 90% of sales of snacks in the early 1900s, is cherished in all social classes and inspires artists, Van Gogh to Picasso, from Verlaine and Rimbaud. Before being banned in Switzerland and in France for its supposed toxic effects, and especially to try to curb alcoholism.

 

"Cradle". On both sides of the border, we can therefore rightly claim the inheritance. Irony of the calendar, a tourist road linking Pontarlier absinthe in Val-de-Travers will open next month, with the financial support of French local authorities. "It's been six years since I forbid this unifying project. It is absurd to separate the historic birthplace and the economic capital of absinthe, "sighs the wine merchant Philippe Chapon, a connoisseur of" blue "and president of the Friends of the Museum of Pontarlier.

 

"We have much to answer all objections," assured the Swiss press the president of the Association of Producers of Val-de-Travers. The balance of power has been reversed since the end of Prohibition. There are now 25 distilleries Swiss side, two cons in Pontarlier. Pernod and now produces his green fairy in Marseille. More importantly, France authorizes absinthe since 2001 ... But not the name! Producers must register on the label the name hypocrisy "of absinthe spirits plants. "It does not help us," acknowledges Mary Benech of the French Federation of spirits. She argues that absinthe is finally "dédiabolisée. But the Ministry of Agriculture remains adamant.

 

However, the Val de Travers is not sure of winning. In 2005, its producers had tried to snatch the title "squeegee" to the detriment of other producers Swiss and French. They were dismissed after two years of proceedings by the Federal Court of Geneva, the highest court in Switzerland.

Edited by techdiver

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"ready to spend 50 euros the bottle"

 

Only if I absolutely bloody have to! my number 1 only cost 35€ (which is still too much)

 

Anyway thats a bit off track, looks like there's going to be a decent opposition instead of internet derision that doesn't flow on when face to face.

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Apparently, they think that there is no actual "automatic" protection of a product on a larger scale if it's protected in switzerland (I'm not taking any position here, just relating hearsays)

No, it's not "automatic" in that the list of IGPs that is to be protected gets amended by the EU and Switzerland from time to time, and other countries then get to object -- but the intent is that if no one does it is actually pretty automatic. But even if you can stop it, I don't think that everyone has a right to make a nuisance of themselves to others, and nipping it in the bud in Switzerland would be far cheaper and easier than to resist the IGP later.

 

 

and the guys from the Val, even drunk as hell, feel that Pontarlier, sharing the same soil and the same natural conditions, should be covered by the IGP too.

Then they should have written it while they were drunk, because that sure as hell didn't make it in the application written when they were presumably sober.

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